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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband was asked if we would consider a short term move to Puebla. His company needs someone to fill in and train some of the employees at their Puebla plant. The plant is at this address: Av. Resurrección Norte No. 12, Fraccionamiento Industrial Resurrección 72920 Puebla Where would be a good place to live knowing that my husband would be working in this area?

We do not speak Spanish. It would be a 6 or 12 month assignment. We do have experience being expats as we lived in Germany for 2 years. The company would furnish an apartment and a vehicle for us, so that wouldn't be much of an issue. We also have 2 small boys who would be 4 and 2 years old at the time of the move. Any tips, advice or words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

Basically, I'm just concerned about what our lives would be like if we agreed to do this. We live in a very small town in the US and did the same in Germany (maybe 20,00 people). We are up for adventure, but such a large city is a bit intimidating. :eek:

I would love to put my 4 year old in preschool as well. Basically, I just want to know what everyday life would be like. Would we encounter lots of problems because of our lack of knowing the language? When we first moved to Germany (before DH was fluent) it wasn't too much of a problem. We knew a few words of German, they had limited English, but we could figure out ways to communicate. We have a couple months to decide on this, but I want to get as much information as possible.
 

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Welcome! You are going to enjoy your assignment to Puebla and you should not worry about fluency. Of course, your children will be fluent in Spanish within months, at their ages. You'll have to study and 'now' is a good time to start. Use Google to look for 'Destinos' and other online resources.
I'm sure some 'poblanos' will respond to your query with more specific information on Puebla.
 

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I have been in Puebla since July of 2008. I have enjoyed my time here and I think you will also. You will get by without knowing Spanish but having basic language skills helps a lot. You should ask your company to provide some language CDs and listen to them. There are many good places to live. I live in a town just outside Puebla called San Andreas Cholula. Many of my associates that came here at the same time chose the Cholula area. Where you will be working is a little further. My drive is about 20 minutes yours would be about 30 minutes from here (depending on how fast your car will go). Driving will take a little getting used to. There is no way to describe it but it it wont take you long to know what I mean. All the places that you would consider living have 24/7 security. Everything here is surrounded by barbed wire and electric fences. Be careful about prices. You can get a lot more for less here if you know what you're doing. Some places will increase the price 30-50% when they see or hear "******/gringa". Your company should have/make someone available to assist you. Be careful with that also. They all work together here. I have a nice fully furnished (nice furniture too) 2 bedroom one bath condo that I pay $6000 pesos per month (roughly $470 USD). Utilities aren't much at all. I suggest you stay in a hotel for a week or two and check things out. I don't have kids but I know there are some schools that are designed especially for your situation. There are families from all over the world here in your situation. My assignment is done here and I'll be moving back to the USA soon. I'm happy to help if I'm still here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much for responding to me.

I have spoken to one person I know that lived in Mexico with her children for 3 years. She told me stories of having cars stolen and being robbed but followed those up with how wonderful some of it was as well.

It looks like we'll be heading down there in July. Generally we get a week visit to look at our apartment choices and decide which one we want as well as get a feel for the area.

I'm not very concerned about the cost of things because we won't be paying for a place to live or for our car. I guess we better break out Rosetta Stone and get it re-installed on the computer.
 

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I don't know anyone who has had any trouble being robbed or getting cars stolen in the city of Puebla. There definitely are some dangerous areas just like any large city in the US. You are fortunate to be coming to Puebla. More than one person that grew up here told me that Puebla is a "protected" City. They say that many politicians and drug lords have their families here. I don't know if that's really true or not but there have not been any shoot outs, multiple drug trafficking murders or beheadings in this area. There is always a large police presence where ever I go. The full body armor and automatic weapons are a bit intimidating but I'm use to it now.

I had a couple co-works get sick from food and amebic infections. They spent a few days in the hospital. Everyone I know has some problem with "that". There are medicines and food remedies available. I don't mean to scare you. It's a way of life here. Locals have the same problem.

Here are a few things I wish someone had told me more about when I got here:

* Fruits and vegetables bought at stores and markets - Don't eat anything that doesn't have to be peeled first. If you buy things like lettuce, be sure to wash it in purified water with this stuff they sell here that kills all the bad stuff.
* Stick to the better restaurants at first. You'll get to know other places quickly. Some of the little road side stands have the best food and salsas (hope you like salsa) but they look nasty. Don't be brave on your own at first. Have someone who knows point out trustworthy places.
* Buy this stuff called Yakult. You'll find in in the dairy section. It builds up the natural flora in you digestive system that fights off bad stuff naturally. I was also told (I don't know how true this is) to take a drink of pepto-Bismol every day. That will protect you from parasites that get into your stomach wall. Personally, I only take pepto when I don't feel good.

Google how to make phone calls in mexico. Dialing to and from cell phones and land lines is different here. Sometimes you have to dial 044 or 045. Toll free numbers are different also. Example: 1-800 is 1-880 here.

I hope that helps a little.
 

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I'm a bit surprised by the previous post. All of those precautions seem a bit extreme and too many precautions can actually create a situation which decreases your body's natural defenses.
We've lived in Mexico for nine years and have never been sick. We eat out in all sorts of places.
A large proportion of the fruits and vegetables that you ate in the USA actually came from Mexico and there is no 'magic sanitation' at the border. If you want to soak them in water with a few drops of Microdyne, OK. Did you also do that in the USA?
If you see local traffic at any eating place, it will be safe. Mexicans are very careful in food handling and won't even handle money and food; usually having an assistant to take your cash.
Yakult is yoghurt and, yes, it is good for you. Regular use of Pepto Bismol is not a good idea.
Should you get a parsitic problem, there are simple medications for that at all 'farmacias', just ask.
1-800 numbers, even the substitutes such as 880, are not free to the USA or anywhere else. They are only free within the USA-Canada-Puerto Rico. You are better off using the conventional number or calling collect, if they will accept the charge; as is the case with most credit card companies, banks, investment houses, etc.
The first and most important step to a successful move to Mexico is to relax, enjoy the experience and the adventure, learn some Spanish and above all, don't be paranoid. Ninety nine percent of the propaganda that you've heard is media hype and you will see none of it 'up close and personal'. You may actually realize that you are more comfortable here, than there.
 

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I have to agree with RV Gringos statements. Although I don’t have any border experience almost all the bad stuff that you hear about is all hype. Like any city in the US there are good and bad parts you could just as easily get killed in a US city as a Mexican city. I feel just as safe in Mexico as I do here.
 

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It is not that these horrible events don't occur; they do. However, they generally involve 'bad guys' on both sides or 'bad guys' vs. authorities. The involvement of innocent 'civilians' is extremely rare and is usually 'collateral damage' in a cartel hot spot, like Ciudad Juarez, etc. When you do see a headline that involves an American or Canadian 'tourist', it almost always turns out to be either a drunk party participant jumping off a hotel balcony, a 'druggie' getting in over his head or some other drug/mafia/cartel connection with its own system of 'justice'.
 
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