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Hello friends,:)
I am Sri Ram from India. I am into Hotel and Service Apartment business for the last 10 years. I have been to Toulouse France a few times. Now I am 37 years old. I have plans to start a Hotel or B&B business in France and settle permanently. To fulfill this I would like to start with the following action plan:

1. Completing a MSc or MBA in Toulouse
2. Applying for APS
3. Setting up a Company while on APS
4. Starting the business with either a Hotel or a B&B.
5. Applying for Passport Talent (work Permit)
6. Getting Permanent Residence
7. Getting the citizenship.

Appreciate your valuable suggestions.

Good Day....Sri.:)
 

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Welcome Sri Ram to the Expat forum. First of all, I had better warn you to prepare for a whole bunch of negative input on your plans. Traditionally, many "tourist" retirees here in France believe that setting up as a B&B is going to provide them with enough income to live in France and in the wake of Brexit, those plans have been thrown into something of a turmoil.

The idea of doing a masters degree in France is not a bad idea - but will have to wait until the current pandemic situation is sorted and travel and tourism can begin again. No one has any idea when that is going to be, but you can certainly start doing your planning in the meantime.

The one caution I would have for you with your current plans is to stay extremely flexible. Not only is there no telling when the current travel restrictions will end, but despite all the "hopes" of things going back to "normal" I think it's reasonable to assume that nothing is going to go back to "just like it was before." Particularly in the tourism industry in France and in Europe overall. It will certainly be a matter of judging the situation as it develops and looking for opportunities that may not have been there in pre-pandemic days. Definitely keep watching for developments on the various government sites dealing with visas and particularly education (i.e. Campus France) and work on your French language skills if you aren't already fluent. You can also stay current with the Service Public website - both to learn of new developments and to practice your French language comprehension.

But the big thing will be to stay flexible and keep looking for your unique opportunity as you go.
 

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Hello, welcome to our forum. No comment on the visa , nationality questions. However, a comment on the hotel, b&b business. As a Brit I owned short term rental appartements for a few years, and came in contact with the extensive French rules, laws, culture etc in this area. I live in a tourist area and have met many people who have relevant experience and business interests.

Frankly, I would try working in this business sector for a year or two before committing the necessary capital, perspiration and emotion into what would be a very big personal venture.

One starting point is to decide your target client sector. My appartements were targetted at specifically French people staying 3 weeks for a thermal water cure. Some local people here in the B&B business advertise only to English speaking sectors. It's probably easier to focus on one sector and do it well, rather than try to be all things to everybody. Of course, you could try the sector of "all comers near an international airport", but that again is a very focussed business.

As others here will say you will need a good level of French to deal with the legal, tax, hygiene, Tourist offices, French star rating system etc before you even start talking to customers! You will also need to understand French culture and the way of doing business here. As a Brit I've had many "interesting learning experiences". Coming from a different continent will be a big challenge.

Good luck! Tell us more details and we may be able to give more specific help.

DejW
 

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How about something like this if you want to get involved in the hospitality business in France?


It's a course that gets you a Masters degree in the field and is taught in English. A French Masters degree (IIRC) gives you easier access to a working visa and means that (IIRC) you're able to obtain French citizenship in two years instead of the normal five. You'd have to learn French up to a certain standard to qualify for the citizenship and, probably, establish yourself in the industry.

The French love French qualifications from a French establishment and the above gives you a qualification from a very well known business school (EMLyon), and contrary to what someone on this forum may suggest, Lyon is a very nice place to live.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Welcome Sri Ram to the Expat forum. First of all, I had better warn you to prepare for a whole bunch of negative input on your plans. Traditionally, many "tourist" retirees here in France believe that setting up as a B&B is going to provide them with enough income to live in France and in the wake of Brexit, those plans have been thrown into something of a turmoil.

The idea of doing a masters degree in France is not a bad idea - but will have to wait until the current pandemic situation is sorted and travel and tourism can begin again. No one has any idea when that is going to be, but you can certainly start doing your planning in the meantime.

The one caution I would have for you with your current plans is to stay extremely flexible. Not only is there no telling when the current travel restrictions will end, but despite all the "hopes" of things going back to "normal" I think it's reasonable to assume that nothing is going to go back to "just like it was before." Particularly in the tourism industry in France and in Europe overall. It will certainly be a matter of judging the situation as it develops and looking for opportunities that may not have been there in pre-pandemic days. Definitely keep watching for developments on the various government sites dealing with visas and particularly education (i.e. Campus France) and work on your French language skills if you aren't already fluent. You can also stay current with the Service Public website - both to learn of new developments and to practice your French language comprehension.

But the big thing will be to stay flexible and keep looking for your unique opportunity as you go.
Particularly in the tourism industry in France and in Europe overall. It will certainly be a matter of judging the situation as it develops and looking for opportunities that may not have been there in pre-pandemic days. Definitely keep watching for developments on the various government sites dealing with visas and particularly education (i.e. Campus France) and work on your French language skills if you aren't already fluent. You can also stay current with the Service Public website - both to learn of new developments and to practice your French language comprehension.

But the big thing will be to stay flexible and keep looking for your unique opportunity as you go.
Hi Bev,
Thanks for valuable suggestions. "Assume that nothing is going to go back to just like it was before. STAY FLEXIBLE". You are correct.:)(y)
 

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Hello, welcome to our forum. No comment on the visa , nationality questions. However, a comment on the hotel, b&b business. As a Brit I owned short term rental appartements for a few years, and came in contact with the extensive French rules, laws, culture etc in this area. I live in a tourist area and have met many people who have relevant experience and business interests.

Frankly, I would try working in this business sector for a year or two before committing the necessary capital, perspiration and emotion into what would be a very big personal venture.

One starting point is to decide your target client sector. My appartements were targetted at specifically French people staying 3 weeks for a thermal water cure. Some local people here in the B&B business advertise only to English speaking sectors. It's probably easier to focus on one sector and do it well, rather than try to be all things to everybody. Of course, you could try the sector of "all comers near an international airport", but that again is a very focussed business.

As others here will say you will need a good level of French to deal with the legal, tax, hygiene, Tourist offices, French star rating system etc before you even start talking to customers! You will also need to understand French culture and the way of doing business here. As a Brit I've had many "interesting learning experiences". Coming from a different continent will be a big challenge.

Good luck! Tell us more details and we may be able to give more specific help.

DejW
Hello DejW,
Great inputs. Thanks a lot. "Working in this business sector for a year or two before committing the necessary capital, perspiration and emotion and need a good level of French" Yes you are 100% correct. First I need to get the French language course.(y):)
 

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How about something like this if you want to get involved in the hospitality business in France?


It's a course that gets you a Masters degree in the field and is taught in English. A French Masters degree (IIRC) gives you easier access to a working visa and means that (IIRC) you're able to obtain French citizenship in two years instead of the normal five. You'd have to learn French up to a certain standard to qualify for the citizenship and, probably, establish yourself in the industry.

The French love French qualifications from a French establishment and the above gives you a qualification from a very well known business school (EMLyon), and contrary to what someone on this forum may suggest, Lyon is a very nice place to live.

Hello Peasant,
Thank you very much for the reference. First I need to get the French Language course. After going through the link, I understood that the course is taught in english. Can you kindly suggest the best colleges where the course will be taught in French. 😊👍
 

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Also friends,
I request you to suggest the best course and the best colleges (in Toulouse if possible) that guarentee 100% job placement after completion of the course. 🙏
 

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Also friends,
I request you to suggest the best course and the best colleges (in Toulouse if possible) that guarentee 100% job placement after completion of the course. 🙏
Such a course does not exist in France. If anyone "guarantees" you job placement after a course it is no doubt a human trafficking operation of some sort.
 

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ZRB GOLI -- I think your plan is a good one. I am a little surprised -- normally there are many comments warning you away from the B&B business in France, but so far, so good. There was a couple, from Florida, USA, on this forum who got a Passeport Talent (the original one) from Florida to start a B&B, in France. I have no idea, if they were successful. I also know a British couple that run a B&B in Chamonix, that are very successful. I don't know anything about their situation after this COVID fiasco. The Master's Degree idea is sound -- you would be a step ahead if you found a program where you could internship, at a local establishment to both gain experience, in France, and that would possibly offer full-time employment post graduation. If you're not linked in -- it's been haphazard for recent foreign graduates to ultimately gain permanent employment -- so your self-funded Passeport Talent idea is sound. Cheers, 255
 

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ZRB GOLI -- I think your plan is a good one. I am a little surprised -- normally there are many comments warning you away from the B&B business in France, but so far, so good. There was a couple, from Florida, USA, on this forum who got a Passeport Talent (the original one) from Florida to start a B&B, in France. I have no idea, if they were successful. I also know a British couple that run a B&B in Chamonix, that are very successful. I don't know anything about their situation after this COVID fiasco. The Master's Degree idea is sound -- you would be a step ahead if you found a program where you could internship, at a local establishment to both gain experience, in France, and that would possibly offer full-time employment post graduation. If you're not linked in -- it's been haphazard for recent foreign graduates to ultimately gain permanent employment -- so your self-funded Passeport Talent idea is sound. Cheers, 255
Hi 255,
Thank you for your valuable advice. As you said I am looking forward to get the French language course. After that I would like to study Masters taught in French along with the internship. 😊👍
 

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Hi 255,
Thank you for your valuable advice. As you said I am looking forward to get the French language course. After that I would like to study Masters taught in French along with the internship. 😊👍
Just as an aside - I learned French in school for many years, I used to live in Geneva, French-speaking Switzerland, I can read, speak, write French at a good level, I have no problems with newspapers, books, TV, movies, etc. I can work in a French environment, answer the phone, you name it.

I would not be able to produce papers/university assignments in academic French.

If you are not already quite fluent in the language, you are looking at several years of intensive and specialized language-acquisition.
 

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Hi 255,
Thank you for your valuable advice. As you said I am looking forward to get the French language course. After that I would like to study Masters taught in French along with the internship. 😊👍
Why do you want to do a Masters degree taught in French? Yes, you will need good French, yes a qualification gained in France would likely be an advantage - but you could do a Masters degree in France that is taught in English and still have to do the 'stage', but the degree does not need to be taught in French.
 

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Hi ALKB and BackinFrance,
Thanks a lot for your valuable inputs. Special thanks for explaining your real life experiences. This has changed my decision to learn French for good communication and day to day activities. Finally I decided to study Masters/MBA which is taught in English.🙏
 
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