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Hi everyone,

I have been living in Oz for a few years now and am currently on the 820 partner visa, awaiting 801. I need dental work and have extras insurance. But my OH's Aunt says there is a reciprocal agreement (I'm from UK) that means I can get free dental work. I thought she meant the reciprocal healthcare agreement for any medical treatment needed when I was on a WHV, as a backpacker. But she says no, it's something different to that but not many people know about it, as the Gov't doesn't want us to know about it. Is she right?? Or just :crazy:
 

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Hi everyone,

I have been living in Oz for a few years now and am currently on the 820 partner visa, awaiting 801. I need dental work and have extras insurance. But my OH's Aunt says there is a reciprocal agreement (I'm from UK) that means I can get free dental work. I thought she meant the reciprocal healthcare agreement for any medical treatment needed when I was on a WHV, as a backpacker. But she says no, it's something different to that but not many people know about it, as the Gov't doesn't want us to know about it. Is she right?? Or just :crazy:
Wrong in the sense that the Government wants to hide anything - word would soon get around. :)

There is a program for Chronic Disease Management that can include dental issues if the person has complex care needs and a GP Management Plan and Team Care arrangements - it's sort of a wide-ranging service for those who really need longer-term support with one or more chronic conditions. You might find people eligible for this at Aged Care Homes, but also for those severely or extremely disabled.

There is a big (but limited) free dental program for kids up to 17.

States generally provide dental services free or at greatly reduced cost for any adult that has any type of Pension Concession, Health Care or Seniors Card, however, there may be long waits for treatment.
 

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Wrong in the sense that the Government wants to hide anything - word would soon get around. :)

There is a program for Chronic Disease Management that can include dental issues if the person has complex care needs and a GP Management Plan and Team Care arrangements - it's sort of a wide-ranging service for those who really need longer-term support with one or more chronic conditions. You might find people eligible for this at Aged Care Homes, but also for those severely or extremely disabled.

There is a big (but limited) free dental program for kids up to 17.

States generally provide dental services free or at greatly reduced cost for any adult that has any type of Pension Concession, Health Care or Seniors Card, however, there may be long waits for treatment.
In WA, the service costs 50% of normal: Dental Health Services for adults - reduced fees

http://www.dental.wa.gov.au/adult/eligibility.php

http://www.dental.wa.gov.au/adult/general.php
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the clarification. She must have been talking about the chronic disease management program. I am in QLD and have already served my waiting period for major dental work, so should be all good. :fingerscrossed:
 

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There is a big (but limited) free dental program for kids up to 17.
Would you please provide some more details ? From what little I have read - if a family is not a low income earner or doesn't have any centrelink payments there is no free dental care for kids < 17
 

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Would you please provide some more details ? From what little I have read - if a family is not a low income earner or doesn't have any centrelink payments there is no free dental care for kids < 17
I did say "limited". :)

The "Average" gross household income in Australia is maybe about $110,000 but this figure doesn't reflect most families' income as a small number of very high earners colour this result.

The "Median" gross household income is probably a little under $85,000.

Children in families with incomes under about $94,300 are generally eligible for FTB Part A from Centrelink.

So the majority of Australian households with kids are likely to be eligible for FTA, and be eligible for Medicare, and hence eligible for this program.

But many won't of course, as their income may be higher. If a family is earning $100,000 or more, I'd hope they could pay for dental care for their kids - assuming reasonable dental hygiene, barring orthodontic work, which is an entirely different matter, most kids are not going to be expensive. :)

Temporary visa holders won't be eligible either, but they have the choice of whether they fund ancillary/extras health insurance with their compulsory Private Health Insurance if they have kids, and it's unlikely the Australian Government would choose to subsidise taxpayer-funded services for temporary residents anyway.
 
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