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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone, first post on here. We are moving to Oliva the end of this month (July 2015). I currently home school my son (13) but would have liked to have put him in an international school. Problem is the fees are, quite frankly, daylight robbery!!
Laude Lady Elizabeth, our nearest school in Spain, would cost just over 1000 euros a month. That is without uniform, school trips and everything else school entails.
We have been talking about this move for over 10 years, I really wish we had done it sooner rather than later. I would have put my lad in state school. My husband is in the merchant navy so we could have gone at any time.
If anyone has experience of their kids at senior school in this area please let me know how you have got on, any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Mind you, my son is chuffed to bits, he loves home-school!!!

Thank you everyone who reads this.
Andrea.:)
 

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At €12,000 per year (or less if you don't pay for the summer months when the school is closed) that's hardly daylight robbery. The average cost of private education for a day school pupil in the UK is now 13K per year (sterling) so at today's exchange rate the Spanish one works out substantially cheaper. The UK school fees don't include uniform or all the other extra costs either.

If you want a good quality education for your child and you want to bring him to Spain at a time in his education when he could not cope with being taught in another language, then that's a cost that would have to be borne.
 

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The other issue is that home schooling isn't altogether legal in Spain.

At 13, I would say that unless he is fluent in both Spanish and Valencian, then your son won't cope in ESO (secondary school).

Your only choice, for the sake of your son's education is private schooling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I am obviously only going to get criticism on this site so will cease to post. My son is home schooled because of the dreadful standard of education in our area. He would be in private school here if we could afford it. I was looking for advice from those who have experienced the education system in Spain. Thanks for nothing.
 

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I am obviously only going to get criticism on this site so will cease to post. My son is home schooled because of the dreadful standard of education in our area. He would be in private school here if we could afford it. I was looking for advice from those who have experienced the education system in Spain. Thanks for nothing.
I really don't know why you're getting so animated - chill!

I have three children who are currently going through the Spanish education system so I am talking from a point of strength and knowledge!

At 13 your son will, in all likelihood, struggle.

With regard Valencian, I am in the same province as you so know what I'm talking about.


Home schooling is NOT really allowed in Spain - end of.
 

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I am obviously only going to get criticism on this site so will cease to post. My son is home schooled because of the dreadful standard of education in our area. He would be in private school here if we could afford it. I was looking for advice from those who have experienced the education system in Spain. Thanks for nothing.
If you can't afford private schooling in the UK, why do you think it should be even cheaper than it is, by comparison, in Spain? What sort of country do you think this is?:heh:

I get rather fed up with people wanting to come here but getting miffed when they find out things don't actually cost buttons. If they did, people's wages and our public services would be in a worse state than they are.
 

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I am obviously only going to get criticism on this site so will cease to post. My son is home schooled because of the dreadful standard of education in our area. He would be in private school here if we could afford it. I was looking for advice from those who have experienced the education system in Spain. Thanks for nothing.
I'm sorry, I know home schooling is a personal choice and its yours to make. Although its not strictly illegal in Spain, homeschooling isnt legal either, as the authorities see it as deprivation of a basic human right I believe.

As for a 13 year old starting a Spanish school... well its not just about the education per se, but making friends, homework (of which there is plenty and you may have to help!!!). At 13, he will struggle and possibly miss obtaining any exams or qualifications. So my opinion is international school all the way

Jo xxx
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
We simply cannot afford the private school system in the UK nor Spain,My son experienced extreme, constant bullying at school which affected his health terribly and we did not receive sufficient support from the school nor education authority. There are only 2 secondary schools in our area and everyone wants their child at the other one, so my hands were tied.
My son has been home-schooled for over a year now. I use recognised and accredited sites and he follows the national curriculum. His work is assessed by qualified teachers and he has come on in leaps and bounds. Ironically, the local education authority became interested in his schooling and check his progress on a regular basis.He still sees his school friends most evenings and they stay weekends and holidays. I know I have got a few peoples backs up on here but facts are facts, the private school system is expensive if you due not have the income to pay for it. We are not moving to Spain on a whim and I am not toying with my sons' education, just trying to do the best for him in a difficult situation. I know he would have difficulty adjusting to state school in Spain which is why I have not considered this. He easily makes friends and is a very sociable child, so fingers crossed will adjust well to our move at the end of this month. We are very disheartened by the way he has had to lose his right to a 'normal' education in the UK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I did hope that instead of negative comments like 'it is illegal, end of' from snikpoh, I might have got some useful information on the schooling In Spain. Bitching at me doesn't help my situation. Thanks to those who did give useful CORRECT advice.
 

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I did hope that instead of negative comments like 'it is illegal, end of' from snikpoh, I might have got some useful information on the schooling In Spain. Bitching at me doesn't help my situation. Thanks to those who did give useful CORRECT advice.
I have friends who moved within the UK to ensure their children went to the "right" school!? But that said. A child's happy and successful future doesn't just rely on a "good school" or academic qualifications. I had a gifted child, who, at the age of 14 decided to "throw it away". She left school with no exam results, spent four years driving us to distraction, but then stumbled on an office junior job. Ten years later, she is a very highly paid manager, with a team of 30 people working for her, is married and blissfully happy.

People on the forum are simply offering their views.

Jo xxx

Sent from my D5803 using Expat Forum
 

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I have two children who have been through the whole Spanish school system and are now in university here. I'm not sure what type of useful information you're after?

There are three options for your son's education:

1. International school. Not feasible for your family.

2. Home school. Basically considered illegal in Spain and you might end up in court. (No need to defend your decision to home-school up until now - no one questioned that.)

3. State school. IMO, your son is too old to jump into secondary school classes in a language he doesn't speak and have any chance at success. Many Spanish children need tutorials, fail and have to repeat the year, so imagine how it would be for your son. All I can say is that it would be very, very difficult.

None of the three options is good. Sorry if this is not what you want to hear, but what I'm telling you is CORRECT.
 

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I did hope that instead of negative comments like 'it is illegal, end of' from snikpoh, I might have got some useful information on the schooling In Spain. Bitching at me doesn't help my situation. Thanks to those who did give useful CORRECT advice.
Nobody is bitching. The fact of the matter is that if you choose to homeschool in Spain, you stand a very good chance of being prosecuted.
That is a fact, regardless of anyone's opinion.
We've been here nearly 12 years and my children have been in the state system. I also tutor English kids who are struggling in state schools, almost always because of language issues.
I'm also in the Valencia region and my children have had to study in both castellano & valenciano.
So I think I'm pretty clued up and entitled to an opinion.
However, I won't give one.
I will simply suggest that you think about how you would feel at your child's age, being put into a school and having to study 12 subjects in two languages which you don't understand, and be expected to pass exams in every subject every few weeks. The system here is one of constant assessment, not all based upon exams at age 16 or 18.
Without much extra support from the school, because they can't afford it, due to funding cuts.
And then make your own decision
 

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Hi Op,

Based on what I've read here before when others have asked for advice about schools, I would say that state school for your son is simply not an option. Given that home schooling appears to be illegal (although I don't understand why people are saying "really" illegal and "basically" illegal... It either is or it isn't) I think your best option is to delay your move. It appears to be something you might have done at any point over the past 10 years so can you shift it backwards a bit?

What hopes and aspirations does he have, or do you have for him? Are you anticipating he'll go to uni or go into work after secondary education? What direction do you see him taking if he is in Spain from 14 onwards?
 

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I think that's a good point that @Horlics makes - in three years, his 'mandatory' education would normally end, what happens then? Spanish Universities mainly teach in Spanish so this may not be an option.

His Spanish and/or Valencian may not be good enough to stand a chance of getting a job competing with other people living here. Are the plans for him to go back to UK and hope to get a job?

@Horlics, the reason I wasn't more clear about home schooling is that I don't believe that there is a single-piece of legislation saying 'home schooling is illegal'. The issue is couched in different ways resulting in much the same thing though. If the authorities get to here about it, then the likelihood is that the parents will be prosecuted.
 

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@Horlics, the reason I wasn't more clear about home schooling is that I don't believe that there is a single-piece of legislation saying 'home schooling is illegal'. The issue is couched in different ways resulting in much the same thing though. If the authorities get to here about it, then the likelihood is that the parents will be prosecuted.
That's my understanding too. But if people are being prosecuted then they're being prosecuted for having disobeyed a particular law. It would be interesting if anybody could find such a case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Thanks for all replies.

You never know we might end up being the case that sets the precedent on the varied vague laws on homeschooling in Spain. Bleeding hope not, we have enough to contend with just getting settled out there. Would the authorities have a solid case if he could show he is advanced in his studies and emotionally sound (human rights and all that). We will continue to have the support of our UK educational welfare officer, which might go in our favour.

Worse case scenario, we plead ignorance and we come home. Or stay and fight it, we shall see.

Joking aside, he has his heart set on a career in IT, he is passionate about computing and has been since infant school. We are all going to be taking Spanish lessons. If he picks it up, he can eventually go to college and university in Spain. If not, he wants to come back to the UK to study. We will support him in which ever path he takes.
 

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regardless of prosecution, you need to make sure he gets his grades and good exam results, otherwise colleges/universities simply wont take him.

If he/you all learn Spanish, is it going to be good enough to learn other subjects in that language?? Remember, it took him and everyone a life time to be fluent enough in a language to do that. There are always exceptions, but the odds arent good

I'm not trying to put you off, I'm just thinking of how difficult it could be. My daughter moved to Spain with us when she was 10, went to a state school, was fluentish by the time she was 13 - but that wasnt good enough for her to take or pass exams. so we returned to the UK when she was 14.

I guess you have to weigh up your options.



Jo xxx
 

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We are all going to be taking Spanish lessons. If he picks it up, he can eventually go to college and university in Spain. If not, he wants to come back to the UK to study. We will support him in which ever path he takes.
Please, like I mentioned earlier, if you are moving to Oliva, you will also need Valencian. Universities in this area (University of Valencia) and most of the colleges teach their subjects in a mixture of Spanish, English AND Valencian.

I say this because my son is now in his second year at the University of Valencia.
 
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