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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok this is one that is more for those who are coming from Australia/NZ/ any country where the school year runs from January/Feb to Nov/Dec.

How do you decide what year level to put your kids into?

My son is 13 and in year 7 already and has been held back when he was younger due to having Asperger's but because our school year runs Jan to Nov while the British school year runs Aug to June I don't know whether to put him into year 8 again (we're moving him halfway through next year) or to try and push him up to year 9, hubby is saying to put him into year 8 again but he will be so so much older.

Also just a general - how have your kids (regardless of where your from) dealt with changing schools internationally what support have you given them?
 

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While parental view may be taken into account, ultimately here in UK it's the school's decision which year group your child will be placed in. And unlike some other countries, almost all children are placed in the year group determined by their birthday, and it's up to the school to provide support where needed and extension tasks for the more able ('gifted and talented'). Also 'repeating the year' is not a practice here.

In general, British schools cope rather well with international pupils/students, reflecting the ethnic and nationality mix we now have in UK. O course schools do vary in the quality and amount of support they are able to offer, so parents should choose the schools carefully (though when moving in mid-year or at any time other than the usual entry points, your choice will be limited to those with places). If you are Catholic or Anglican, church schools offer Catholic/Christian ethos with good pastoral care and often have good academic standards as well. A letter of commendation from your clergy will be useful.
As for the children themselves, those coming from English-speaking countries have distinct advantage and seem to cope with transition rather well. Compared to many countries, UK schools tend to be more traditional with enforced uniform and rules, but teaching methods are contemporary with very high use of IT (interactive whiteboards, pupil's laptop, email account, virtual learning environment etc).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So Joppa are you saying that even though my son may only be half way through year 8 when he leaves Aus there is a high chance that he may be put into year 9 when he gets there??
 

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Current Year 9 in UK are for pupils aged 13 and 14, for those turning 14 by 31st August 2015. In next academic year starting 1st Sept 2015, Year 9 are for those turning 14 between 1st Sept 2015 to 31st August 2016. So irrespective of which year your son is currently in, he will be placed in the UK year group determined by his birthday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Based on that....it worries me....there is no way he is ready for year ten half way through next year, he's turning 14 this coming December....I'll definitely have to have a good talk with the school once I'm there and I'll make sure I bring his school records from here.....
 

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Remember curriculums are completely different between the two countries and it doesn't mean your son cannot cope with Year 9 or 10 in UK. School will want to do its own teacher assessment than rely on overseas school record.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Joppa I know two teenagers who both have told me UK schooling is harder than Australian schooling, one is a really good friend of my daughter who did an exchange program in the Uk and the other is the host sister of that girl who came here on exchange, and he's struggling with year 7 now here although his Maths levels are well ahead....typical aspergers kid he is....:rolleyes::)
 

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Each child is different so you can't generalise. While you no doubt know your child well, a sweeping generalisation can be misleading. Just follow my suggestions and see how you get on. Schools generally welcome frank discussion about individual pupil, but at the end of the day, they make the decision in the best interest of the child.
 
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