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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As we move forward with our planned retirement in France we have come upon a potential problem. Our dogs have been raised on Costco rotisserie chickens (typically 4 plus pounds each) with organic vegetables and rice. I know there is a Costco now near Paris, but that will be too far for us to travel on a consistent basis (we go through about 5 chickens per week).
Does anyone know of a location near Limoges or Bordeaux that offers something similar? It would be great to be able to purchase two to three weeks worth at a time. We are willing to drive an hour or so to secure a supplier that will meet our canine kids needs.
Thank you all for the information.
 

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Most charcuteries or butchers sell rotisserie chickens that are every bit as good as the Costco ones. And, if you have a standing order for 5 a week, you can probably cut a deal with your local merchant once you get to know them (and to know that your dogs like them).

Just wander through town and check with the butchers and charcutiers - very often they have a big rotisserie machine out on the sidewalk in front of the shop doing 12 to 20 chickens at a time.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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As we move forward with our planned retirement in France we have come upon a potential problem. Our dogs have been raised on Costco rotisserie chickens (typically 4 plus pounds each) with organic vegetables and rice. I know there is a Costco now near Paris, but that will be too far for us to travel on a consistent basis (we go through about 5 chickens per week).
Does anyone know of a location near Limoges or Bordeaux that offers something similar? It would be great to be able to purchase two to three weeks worth at a time. We are willing to drive an hour or so to secure a supplier that will meet our canine kids needs.
Thank you all for the information.
Very nice to hear some owners do feed their pets well.
Most Carrefour or SuperU supermarkets sell rotisserie chickens.
 

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Just one further comment: if you take a look at any of the old Julia Child videos, you'll probably find one of her shows on cooking chicken. Julia always said that chicken in France tastes "chickenier." In any event, chickens in France are raised differently, are not bred to produce the overly enormous breasts, and frankly do taste, well, more intensely like chicken. Diet, terroir, breed, who knows?

I'm also told that Costco has a policy of sourcing at least 50% of all their merchandise locally - so I would assume that they are buying French chickens. You might want to try out the various local rotisserie chickens on your dogs to see what they prefer. And in a pinch, there are a couple of online sources of high quality pet food (at prices more reasonable than the local garden center). Just ask if you want or need recommendations.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Leclerc supermarkets also have such chickens, hot and cold.

You can also buy electric rotisseries from around 60 euros, which could prove a cost effective alternative.

I have a rotisserie built into my French bought electric oven, which provides very acceptable roasts. However it also makes a lot of additional oven cleaning.
 

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As we move forward with our planned retirement in France we have come upon a potential problem. Our dogs have been raised on Costco rotisserie chickens (typically 4 plus pounds each) with organic vegetables and rice. I know there is a Costco now near Paris, but that will be too far for us to travel on a consistent basis (we go through about 5 chickens per week).
Does anyone know of a location near Limoges or Bordeaux that offers something similar? It would be great to be able to purchase two to three weeks worth at a time. We are willing to drive an hour or so to secure a supplier that will meet our canine kids needs.
Thank you all for the information.
Just a question, I thought that chicken bones were dangerous for dogs because the bones are brittle and the shards are sharp. This is not the case? Because if it is not, our dog is going to be really upset.
 

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Over on another forum I follow, for a fancy cooking gadget, there are those who make chicken and whatever else for their dogs, and then use the bones to make what they call "bone broth" - evidently a rich, flavorful broth that can either be used in preparing the dog food, or can be enjoyed by the humans. It is said to be very healthful and useful in other sorts of cooking.

Neither the dogs nor the humans actually consume the bones, but they are used for every bit of "goodie" possible before being tossed.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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LOL, I thought everyone knew that chicken bones (cooked or raw) are great for stock. However I had exactly the same reaction as LF to this thread. I actually wondered why on earth anyone would specify 'rotisserie' chickens, as in my experience most people would boil (or rather poach) the chickens, which gives you the stock straight away.
 

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LOL, I thought everyone knew that chicken bones (cooked or raw) are great for stock. However I had exactly the same reaction as LF to this thread. I actually wondered why on earth anyone would specify 'rotisserie' chickens, as in my experience most people would boil (or rather poach) the chickens, which gives you the stock straight away.
Actually, some of the recipes I've seen for "dog food" call for taking a cooked rotisserie chicken and basically boiling it down like a soup or stew, then removing the bones as you would when making chicken soup. OR, picking all the meat off and then roasting the bones before you make stock/soup from just the bones.

Some folks are actually quite devoted to making "from scratch" dog food. (Though I'm told you really should add certain supplements to make it really "complete" in all nutritional items.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Actually, some of the recipes I've seen for "dog food" call for taking a cooked rotisserie chicken and basically boiling it down like a soup or stew, then removing the bones as you would when making chicken soup. OR, picking all the meat off and then roasting the bones before you make stock/soup from just the bones.

Some folks are actually quite devoted to making "from scratch" dog food. (Though I'm told you really should add certain supplements to make it really "complete" in all nutritional items.)
Cheers,
Bev
So I can only assume that the choosing to buy 'cooked rotisserie chickens' is to avoid cooking the chicken yourself :D
 

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So I can only assume that the choosing to buy 'cooked rotisserie chickens' is to avoid cooking the chicken yourself :D
Not necessarily - there are those who make chicken soup by starting with a roasted chicken. Evidently the roasting greatly enhances the flavor of the soup. Buying a cooked rotisserie chicken eliminates one step in the process.

I'm just glad my cats eat the "all meat, no grain" catfood I found for them online. It's actually not nearly as expensive as the fancy "health food" brands in the garden shops here, and I get it delivered to the door as needed.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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This has to be the most daft thread I have ever read.

Rotisserie chickens for a dog. LOL

This has to be a wind-up.
Quite a few years ago there was a UK TV pet training series.
One couple cooked a Sunday style roast with all the trimmings every night for their 2 Labs while they had sandwiches for their own dinner.
 

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Quite a few years ago there was a UK TV pet training series.
One couple cooked a Sunday style roast with all the trimmings every night for their 2 Labs while they had sandwiches for their own dinner.
Some dog owners need serious help. Really, they do. I bet their dogs eat better than they do.

Having googled about, it seems that Foie Gras is not a good idea to feed your dog with. :D
 

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My cat eats lizards. It catches one, eats the body then plays with the tail until its stops wiggling.

It is fresh, organic and quite fun.

Whenever we have a rotisserie 'carrefour' chicken I often give her some of the left overs. She just turns her nose up and goes back outside for one of her organic lizards.

Cats are very smart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You are correct, we debone the chickens before feeding the dogs. We have tried pressure cooking the chickens, but one of the dogs does not do well with the result (gives him gas so bad we can't live in the same house).
 
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