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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I perfectly understand that it's a ridiculous question. I guess I just need confirmation. Thanks.
 

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What does it convert to in euros? Is it US dollars? Why Paris? It's not an obvious retirement destination!
Hi, Chica:The dollar and Euro are roughly equivalent at the moment: $40,000 is roughly 40,000 Euro. I love Paris: I would like to retire to a place I love.
 

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Not ridiculous at all but it depends on your lifestyle to a great extent. The biggest expense is housing and if you are going to be renting somewhere that will take a big chunk out of your income. As will your health insurance.

I understand the attraction of Paris but there are other very lovely cities in France where the cost of living will be less, and Paris is never too far away by air/train when you feel the need to be there.
 

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I do not live in Paris but have visited many times and understand why you love it. I love to visit but could not live there. I think it is do-able but I think you will have to pick and choose what you spend on and you might not have the hugest choice of where to live. A lot probably depends on your expectations. You could give it a go for a year and if it's not working out move somewhere else? If you moved somewhere smaller it might be easier to integrate/make friends.
 

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It's definitely doable, but as others said, it depends on your expectations and your lifestyle. It will not be enough to buy a house/apartment. Also depends if you plan on living way out in the suburbs or in the center of it all. You may need a roommate or even a couple if you don't want to spend over half your budget just on a rental. Or if you're ok with a small studio, that can be a way to go as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What I'm hearing is that it's not out of the realm of possibility if my expectations are modest. In fact, they're very modest, I think, as far as living conditions: I'm happy to live in a studio or one-bedroom flat. But I wouldn't want to live in the suburbs; the whole point for me would be to be able to live in the arrondissements I really love after a lifetime of living in small-town America. How much would it cost to live in a small one-bedroom flat in the center of town?
Also, what are the requirements for retiring in France? How much money must am American bring with him?
Thanks.
 

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As far as the visa requirements go, you should check the website for your local French consulate. Retirees are given "visiteur" visas and are expected to produce evidence of their financial resources and health insurance coverage. The consulates are careful not to publish any figures regarding "how much" they consider to be an adequate income, however you can start with the SMIC (French minimum wage) as a guideline. Currently the SMIC is about 17,500 € a year. But if you mention that you plan to settle in Paris, chances are they'll want to see something more than that.

You can get an idea of rental prices by looking at a website like seloger (Petites annonces immobilières | 1er site immobilier français | Portail immo) or pap (IMMOBILIER - Annonces immobilières | De Particulier à Particulier - PAP) and fill in Paris 1e (for the "center" of Paris). Just remember that you normally have to be able to show income that covers the rent by 3 times.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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zaphod said:
What I'm hearing is that it's not out of the realm of possibility if my expectations are modest. In fact, they're very modest, I think, as far as living conditions: I'm happy to live in a studio or one-bedroom flat. But I wouldn't want to live in the suburbs; the whole point for me would be to be able to live in the arrondissements I really love after a lifetime of living in small-town America. How much would it cost to live in a small one-bedroom flat in the center of town? Also, what are the requirements for retiring in France? How much money must am American bring with him? Thanks.
And - that one bedroom flat, might only be 35 m2 (or 350 sf), and in a 6th floor walkup with no elevator. Next time you're in Paris, check out how much fun it is to climb 7 flights of stairs a couple times a day.
 

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And - that one bedroom flat, might only be 35 m2 (or 350 sf), and in a 6th floor walkup with no elevator. Next time you're in Paris, check out how much fun it is to climb 7 flights of stairs a couple times a day.
Yuuuup! When I was in Paris for my masters program, I rented a fully furnished apartment of about 35 sq. meters for 1100 euros per month, and that was in the 11th district. And it was a 5th floor walkup with narrow, spiral staircases that gave me vertigo. I dreaded going up and down those stairs every day. Even worse when you have a few days of groceries to take up with you.
 

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I rented a chambre de bonne many many years ago (67-68) where I lived for two years.

The stairs were a nightmare but there was an oval window (oeil de boeuf) with a view over the Paris rooftops to the Sacré Coeur which was breathtaking, especially at night when it was lit up.

Couldn't manage the stairs today tho', with or without groceries. And the man who brought up the bottles of gas got a good tip, I don't know how he did it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I rented a chambre de bonne many many years ago (67-68) where I lived for two years.

The stairs were a nightmare but there was an oval window (oeil de boeuf) with a view over the Paris rooftops to the Sacré Coeur which was breathtaking, especially at night when it was lit up.

Couldn't manage the stairs today tho', with or without groceries. And the man who brought up the bottles of gas got a good tip, I don't know how he did it.
That sounds perfect for me
 

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That sounds perfect for me
Yes its does sound good doesn't it...cheap, stunning view - but it was just a room with a sink, shared toilet on the landing outside, bedbugs in the mattress initially provided, pretty awful really. Plus those seven flights of stairs. Sort of thing you put up with when you are young and have no choice. We (myself and the friend I shared with) used to go to the local baths once a week for a soak in a hot bath.

We weren't down and out like Orwell but life in Paris was expensive even then. Great experience tho'.
 

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Yuuuup! When I was in Paris for my masters program, I rented a fully furnished apartment of about 35 sq. meters for 1100 euros per month, and that was in the 11th district. And it was a 5th floor walkup with narrow, spiral staircases that gave me vertigo. I dreaded going up and down those stairs every day. Even worse when you have a few days of groceries to take up with you.
I agree. My husband and I live on the 4th floor in our apartment building and I can't even imagine what it would be like living on the 5th or even the 6th floor, and I'm 27!! We have an elevator but I hardly trust that rickety thing. Not to mention it isn't always working either. So, be careful about that because it is a pain in the butt to carry groceries.
 

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7th floor current roof dweller in Paris here, 12 square meters. Zaphod I can't speak for you...however, this is fine and perfect for my temporary current situation. (Taking a year off in Paris). I wanted a good central-ish location like you did too (I had very specific arr area range wanted.) I have 107 stairs both ways (yes I counted) and no elevator...you do have to plan around it in some ways, make sure your trips down are really worth it, do several things at once, and plan the groceries etc.

Anyway I've been here about 5 months and realize, though it's great now, I don't think I'd want this permanently. The kitchen too...there's basically no cooking space whatsover. I feel like I'm on Cutthroat Kitchen (that show on Food Network where they are given weird challenges like using a toy baby kitchen to prepare a meal) ... trying to come up with creative ways to prepare meals with barely any surface space. Haha. I do have a bathroom though thankfully.

My point is...it's great and just what I needed/wanted for the time being. I could do it for a few years even, I'd think. But a permanent move...I don't think so. I'd have to go for something a little bigger, a little lower ... which sadly likely would mean farther out. (I do really love the location!!!) From the sound of it, you could afford some more than what I have though, so maybe you could find a one bedroom on the 4th floor in a central-ish area. It'd still be small and cozy though. Even expensive ones are smallish.

So yeah. You're not me, but, just some food for thought. And yes I'd say $40,000 is doable in Paris if you work it out, find a rental not too expensive, and are conscious about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
7th floor current roof dweller in Paris here, 12 square meters. Zaphod I can't speak for you...however, this is fine and perfect for my temporary current situation. (Taking a year off in Paris). I wanted a good central-ish location like you did too (I had very specific arr area range wanted.) I have 107 stairs both ways (yes I counted) and no elevator...you do have to plan around it in some ways, make sure your trips down are really worth it, do several things at once, and plan the groceries etc.

Anyway I've been here about 5 months and realize, though it's great now, I don't think I'd want this permanently. The kitchen too...there's basically no cooking space whatsover. I feel like I'm on Cutthroat Kitchen (that show on Food Network where they are given weird challenges like using a toy baby kitchen to prepare a meal) ... trying to come up with creative ways to prepare meals with barely any surface space. Haha. I do have a bathroom though thankfully.

My point is...it's great and just what I needed/wanted for the time being. I could do it for a few years even, I'd think. But a permanent move...I don't think so. I'd have to go for something a little bigger, a little lower ... which sadly likely would mean farther out. (I do really love the location!!!) From the sound of it, you could afford some more than what I have though, so maybe you could find a one bedroom on the 4th floor in a central-ish area. It'd still be small and cozy though. Even expensive ones are smallish.

So yeah. You're not me, but, just some food for thought. And yes I'd say $40,000 is doable in Paris if you work it out, find a rental not too expensive, and are conscious about it.
This was terrifically informational. Thank you. I agree: I think I could probably get away with your situation for a year as well, but not permanently. You do give me some hope that forty thousand dollars might allow me to do well in Paris, though, so thank you.

I do have one question: where is your apartment, and why did you decide to live in that location?
 

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Why Paris? It's not an obvious retirement destination!
Just to add to this... I live in Paris however have travelled much of France. There are far better destinations than here for retirement, especially considering you'd be living on $40,000 per year. Your money would go so much further away from the city, and you would certainly enjoy a better standard of living, (and weather if you head further south).
 
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