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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

My situation is as follows; I live and work in the Netherlands. The company I work for is only located in the Netherlands. I would like to live in France. Once moved to France I would be working from home for my company in the Netherlands.

Now the last few weeks I've contacted a couple of real estate agencies to see if I can rent a appartment/studio. I prepared documents (ID, Job contract, Paychecks etc.) however most of them have turned me down due to my company being in the Netherlands. And so it does not have a Chamber of Commerce number in France and they don't want to take the risk.

Is there a way to get around this? Or is my only hope to do it through people directly? (Like pap.fr for example)

Thanks in advance!
 

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Even if the company you work for is located in the Netherlands, if it employs a French resident to carry out work in France then it would be obliged to pay social security contributions to France, since France would be responsible for your healthcare.
Quite apart from the rental issues, you and your employer need to look into the social security/tax situation more carefully before you make the move.
https://www.urssaf.fr/portail/home/...saf-pour-votre-entrepr/firmes-etrangeres.html
"Vous êtes un employeur établi à l’étranger. Vous n’avez pas d’établissement en France. Si vous embauchez un salarié en France pour y exercer une activité professionnelle dans cet Etat, il relève obligatoirement du régime français de Sécurité sociale et les cotisations doivent être versées à ce dernier."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Even if the company you work for is located in the Netherlands, if it employs a French resident to carry out work in France then it would be obliged to pay social security contributions to France, since France would be responsible for your healthcare.
Quite apart from the rental issues, you and your employer need to look into the social security/tax situation more carefully before you make the move.
"Vous êtes un employeur établi à l’étranger. Vous n’avez pas d’établissement en France. Si vous embauchez un salarié en France pour y exercer une activité professionnelle dans cet Etat, il relève obligatoirement du régime français de Sécurité sociale et les cotisations doivent être versées à ce dernier."
Thank you for your response! Although I think I've explained it wrong.

The reason for moving to France is due to my girlfriend living there. Since I already have a job here in the Netherlands and them being fine with me working from home, I figured I could move to France and continue my work.

So my company doesn't help with the relocation, as this is a thing I came up with myself and is not needed for my job.

My girlfriend renting for me is not an option as she makes less than I do currently.
 

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As EuroTrash says, you need to be registered for taxes (particularly "cotisations" - or social insurances) if you are going to be resident in France. The French tax law recognizes you as "tax resident" in France if your primary residence is in France or if you are carrying out a trade or business in France. That last one means where you are located while you're doing the work - regardless of where the employer or customer is located in the world.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Agree with the other responses (which relate to your working from home for the Dutch company). As far as renting is concerned, I suspect you may well need to deal with private rentals as opposed to agencies. An alternative may be to get a letter from your employer stating that you will be continuing your employment in France by working from home whilst being paid from the Netherlands - you never know your luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the feedback. I was misinformed about the taxes etc, once living in France.

This would mean the company I work for would have to take into account the social taxes of France once they pay out my paycheck. This seems too much of a hassle to even ask for, as I came up with this idea myself and the company itself is quite small. So I would have to look for something else. Which might be quitting and finding a job or find one before moving to France.

In case anyone has a other idea of how to keep my current job and live in France, i'd be happy to hear about it. Although I assume theres no other way of doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for the portage salarial or umbrella company tip. I checked it and called one, they said, atleast with them, it wouldn't be possible. Mostly done for contractors as I understood.

I've looked at one other thing which is the tax treaty between the Netherlands and France. They have a so called 183 days agreement. If I stay in France within that term, I will only have to pay income tax to the Netherlands.

This still leaves me the social taxes. For that, as I understood, it would be possible to get a so called "A1" or "certificate of coverage", which would help me with only having to pay social taxes for the Netherlands (only if I stay within the 183 days term). In which case my company would not have to register in France, etc.

Figured I'd give an update. In case anyone has any experience with this, please let me know.

I'll try to give updates whenever I can so anyone who comes across this post and is in a similarsituation would hopefully know what to do :)
 

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This still leaves me the social taxes. For that, as I understood, it would be possible to get a so called "A1" or "certificate of coverage", which would help me with only having to pay social taxes for the Netherlands (only if I stay within the 183 days term). In which case my company would not have to register in France, etc.

In case anyone has any experience with this, please let me know.
I got an A1 when I first moved from the UK, though it was a different situation from yours - for a start I was self employed, and secondly I had no thoughts of limiting myself to 180 days. When I applied I simply said that I didn't know if it would be a permanent move or not, I intended to stay for a year or so to test the waters and if it worked out I would stay and if not I would come back. I was actually very surprised to get the A1 because everyone says the criteria are very strict, but I just applied because the option was there.

In fact I very quickly decided I was staying and after a few months I cancelled the A1 because I felt a bit of a fraud, living in France but not paying my dues here. Plus getting work without a siret number was awkward.

Good luck with the application, it does solve a lot of problems if you get it.
 
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