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Dear Bev, OK, came up with a new plan. Have found a small (but great) Photo Studio to rent in Paris 2 blocks from the apartment. Would like to rent it (it's a 2 yr deal) and start doing some fashion shooting for the agencies around here - same ones, more or less, I have worked with in the past in LA (as well as freelance stuff). What do we need to do this properly/legally?

Some extra/side points that might be important. This would not be our main source of income. We own/run (part time), a long term business in the USA that's very stable and that would continue to be our main source of income. Of course I have no problem paying French taxes and whatever else applies. So how can I get this thing going as fast as possible? The reason I'm in such a big hurry is I need to lock in this Studio in the next few days.

One last thing. I have friends/relatives in Sweden and Spain that would be willing to relocate to Paris. Being in the EU, if they were to put everything under their name could this thing be speeded along? Having an empty studio stand there for months while I'm paying rent and not using it is obviously not a smart financial move. Is it possible to get all this rushed through? I know they do it for models all the time. They arrive from NYC or LA and a week later are working legally, not able to speak French or anything. How's that done? Some kind of waiver the agency gets or something? Maybe they do it for the photographers too..... just a thought (kind of a question too). Thanks, Zoom
 

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You're going to need to set up some form of business entity. Exactly what sort I have to leave up to you, because only you know what your operating parameters will be. One peculiarity of French business law is that you must have a person designated as the "head" of your business, company, corporation or whatever - the guy who is willing to accept the legal liability for the business. And that person normally has to be a legal resident who can be appropriately enrolled in the various French social insurances.

As a US citizen, you're going to need some form of residence visa (with working privileges) to be able to operate a photo studio (or any other business). If your Swedish friends set up the business, you still need some form of legal residence in order to work for them in any capacity.

And don't even mention "rushing things along" to the nice people at the Chambre de Commerce (which is where you need to go first to put everything in motion). This is France, after all. Things will go much more quickly if you just go with the flow and let them handle things for you. Try to rush them and you'll find out just how slow molasses flows on a cold day.

Anyhow, you need to check here: Offre de services de la CCIP aux entreprises du Grand Paris to get yourself started. There used to be a "carte de commerçant" category - for a foreigner who sets up and runs his own business - but I haven't heard anything about this for years now. It may no longer be available, but it wouldn't hurt to ask the Paris CCIP about it.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You're going to need to set up some form of business entity. Exactly what sort I have to leave up to you, because only you know what your operating parameters will be. One peculiarity of French business law is that you must have a person designated as the "head" of your business, company, corporation or whatever - the guy who is willing to accept the legal liability for the business. And that person normally has to be a legal resident who can be appropriately enrolled in the various French social insurances.

As a US citizen, you're going to need some form of residence visa (with working privileges) to be able to operate a photo studio (or any other business). If your Swedish friends set up the business, you still need some form of legal residence in order to work for them in any capacity.

And don't even mention "rushing things along" to the nice people at the Chambre de Commerce (which is where you need to go first to put everything in motion). This is France, after all. Things will go much more quickly if you just go with the flow and let them handle things for you. Try to rush them and you'll find out just how slow molasses flows on a cold day.

Anyhow, you need to check here: Offre de services de la CCIP aux entreprises du Grand Paris to get yourself started. There used to be a "carte de commerçant" category - for a foreigner who sets up and runs his own business - but I haven't heard anything about this for years now. It may no longer be available, but it wouldn't hurt to ask the Paris CCIP about it.
Cheers,
Bev
Dear Bev, Holy Moly, that was quick, a very fine trait IMHO. I was busy writing you an E-mail so did not see this. Thanks tons for answering so fast, will use your advice and get to work on all this. Thanks again, highly appreciated, Zoom
 
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