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Hi,

I just received an offer in Herzo for 50k yearly before tax. My question is this enough to live in comfortable in Nuremberg?

Please do consider that I would be moving there with my husband and daughter (1 year old). Additional to that my husband would be unemployed once we make the move at least for the first year since he does not speak english.

I did the math of deducting taxes and healthcare, and that leaves me with a rough 30k after taxes.

Would this be enough? Considering that I have to pay mortgage back home (900 USD)?

Please comeback with your comments, I need help making this decision.

Thanks

Mila
 

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After serving the mortgage, you'd have about €1700/month. This is not far from the poverty line for a family of three, but many local families make do with less, so it is possible (though probably not comfortable).
For your husband's job prospects, English is much less important than German language skills. Does he have any?
 

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Hi,

I just received an offer in Herzo for 50k yearly before tax. My question is this enough to live in comfortable in Nuremberg?

Please do consider that I would be moving there with my husband and daughter (1 year old). Additional to that my husband would be unemployed once we make the move at least for the first year since he does not speak english.

I did the math of deducting taxes and healthcare, and that leaves me with a rough 30k after taxes.

Would this be enough? Considering that I have to pay mortgage back home (900 USD)?

Please comeback with your comments, I need help making this decision.

Thanks

Mila
Will you be on a BlueCard?
 

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Relocating to Nuremberg Germany Reply to Thread

Hi Beppi, Thanks for the comments. I pretty much thought that would not be enough, but I wanted to obtain feedback from others to verify if I was right. It seems like I would have to probably negotiate another 10 or 12 k to actually make it work.
My husband does not speak english at all, and that is part of the relocation offer (Lessons for him), but like I said I won't be able to depend on him during the first year. So that's why I'm really making sure that the numbers add up.
 

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Hi Beppi, Thanks for the comments. I pretty much thought that would not be enough, but I wanted to obtain feedback from others to verify if I was right. It seems like I would have to probably negotiate another 10 or 12 k to actually make it work.
My husband does not speak english at all, and that is part of the relocation offer (Lessons for him), but like I said I won't be able to depend on him during the first year. So that's why I'm really making sure that the numbers add up.

Part of your relocation offer is for your husband to learn ENGLISH?

English is not an official language in Germany.

To be able to have a chance at being employed, he should learn GERMAN.
 

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I'm not quite sure what is a blue card? This is the first time I hear it and I'm guessing that if I don't know, I probably won't.
The EU BlueCard is a special residence and work permit for highly qualified non-EEA nationals.

claim on Eu Blue Card

It has advantages and disadvantages.

The BlueCard gives your dependents (spouse) work rights in Germany from the start. A regular work permit would not allow your spouse to work for the first year of your stay and for the next two consecutive years, extending work rights to your spouse would be up to the discretion of the case worker at the Alien Department (Ausländerbehörde).

An Australian friend of mine was not allowed to work for three years because her husband was not on a BlueCard and the case worker didn't feel it necessary to give her the right to work. (I blame the relocation company that her husband's employer paid to do all the applications for them. I think if they would have done it themselves and had a nice conversation with the case worker, things might have gone different. Who knows.)

The BlueCard also offers an accelerated route to permanent residence if certain requirements (mainly language) are met.

On the other hand, the BlueCard restricts changing your employer during the first two years in Germany (you will need permission from the Department of Labour) and also stops you from moving to another EU country under their BlueCard scheme.

On another note, is this supposed to be a long term move?

Paying a mortgage back home and rent in Germany sounds risky, especially when there could be exchange rate swings.

Could you rent out your home while you are in Germany?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Will you be on a BlueCard?
Part of your relocation offer is for your husband to learn ENGLISH?

English is not an official language in Germany.

To be able to have a chance at being employed, he should learn GERMAN.
Hi ALKB, yes part of the relocation offer is learning english and german. He will get lessons for both. I will get lessons for german.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The EU BlueCard is a special residence and work permit for highly qualified non-EEA nationals.



It has advantages and disadvantages.

The BlueCard gives your dependents (spouse) work rights in Germany from the start. A regular work permit would not allow your spouse to work for the first year of your stay and for the next two consecutive years, extending work rights to your spouse would be up to the discretion of the case worker at the Alien Department (Ausländerbehörde).

An Australian friend of mine was not allowed to work for three years because her husband was not on a BlueCard and the case worker didn't feel it necessary to give her the right to work. (I blame the relocation company that her husband's employer paid to do all the applications for them. I think if they would have done it themselves and had a nice conversation with the case worker, things might have gone different. Who knows.)

The BlueCard also offers an accelerated route to permanent residence if certain requirements (mainly language) are met.

On the other hand, the BlueCard restricts changing your employer during the first two years in Germany (you will need permission from the Department of Labour) and also stops you from moving to another EU country under their BlueCard scheme.

On another note, is this supposed to be a long term move?

Paying a mortgage back home and rent in Germany sounds risky, especially when there could be exchange rate swings.

Could you rent out your home while you are in Germany?
Thanks for the information. Well as of now, I need to ask regarding this blue card topic. I believe I'll just get a normal work permit because that's what I've understood so far, and my company is offering to support my spouse in obtaining employment thru an agency (but he must learn another language German or English). My company has also offered to help my spouse obtain employement within the same company (if possible) but he would have to wait at least 1 year and as said previously he needs the second language.

On the other hand, the contract is permanent or indefinite. So yes, this could be considered a long term move however I don't see myself living in Germany over 5 years. So that's the main reason for not putting the house on sale.

I will put our house on rent, but we would like to ensure that if the house were not rented at some point we would have enough to pay for it ourselves.

Thanks for all the information. It has certainly been very useful.
 

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Since you keep mentioning him learning English or "a second language":
The key to find a job (any job!) in Germany is learning GERMAN, AND ONLY GERMAN!
Jobs for English (and no German) speakers are rare and difficult to find. A year (at full-time effort) is probably the minimum to learn German to a level sufficient for work, so let him concentrate on that first, rather than also learning English.
 

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Thanks for the information. Well as of now, I need to ask regarding this blue card topic. I believe I'll just get a normal work permit because that's what I've understood so far, and my company is offering to support my spouse in obtaining employment thru an agency (but he must learn another language German or English). My company has also offered to help my spouse obtain employement within the same company (if possible) but he would have to wait at least 1 year and as said previously he needs the second language.

On the other hand, the contract is permanent or indefinite. So yes, this could be considered a long term move however I don't see myself living in Germany over 5 years. So that's the main reason for not putting the house on sale.

I will put our house on rent, but we would like to ensure that if the house were not rented at some point we would have enough to pay for it ourselves.

Thanks for all the information. It has certainly been very useful.

I hope you are getting all of this in writing.

I know a few people whose spouses were conveniently forgotten after they had arrived in Germany.

Is your husband highly qualified?
 

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As this is a post about Nuremberg, are there any foreign nationals/inpats living in region (Franconia)?

I'm a student at the university of Nuremberg (FAU) and was wondering if you could help our research on foreigners who relocated to this region (online survey)? That would be really great! Please let me know if you could help!
 
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