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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been in England for 18 months and just shake the feeling that this move was a huge mistake. I moved to join my partner here who has a successful business which at the moment can't change base.

Reasons why I don't like it:

1. The houses are tiny. I'm from Southern Ontario and the houses here are large, spacious and modern. We have separate rooms for our laundry and a huge basement for recreational purposes. My husband's family who live there also have similar large spacious homes. I have not seen a single home in England that can compare to this standard of living and it's honestly getting me down. I know this may sound bratty but when you're used to living a certain way, it's hard to adjust.

2. THE PAY! I was a pharmacy in Canada and paid very well (on avg pharmacists are paid 110k+ in Canada). I received a job here recently and the pay is quite frankly a slap in the face. I will be taking a huge pay cut, being paid around £30k a year. I found most jobs pay a lot less here.

3. The weather, I know it get's cold in Canada but at least we have proper summers. The sun is rarely out here and the so called summer is 20 degrees.

4. The expenses. Real estate in and around Toronto and Vancouver has shot up recently (I see this going back to normal eventually) but I lived in an area where the housing is still affordable. I could never dream of living in a 4500 square foot home like the ones my parents own over here.

5. Brits always say the Canada as a whole is dull (if you live outside large metro areas). I enjoy a family based lifestyle, I don't like the idea of the drinking culture out here. The excessive pub drinking by men well into their 60s is pathetic to me.

Am i being negative or are these real reasons to reconsider my move?

What reasons led you to move to the UK?
 

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I'm actually a UK citizen since birth (never lived anywhere else) and I personally think these are all valid points and if I were in the same shoes, would probably feel the same way x
 

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Lots of British people emigrate to Canada for the reasons you mention. Plus the appeal of being able to drive everywhere.

Personally, I like living in the UK for the opposite reasons. I like to be able to walk from A to B, not need a car and not cross 6 lane highways, I like that the street plans and architecture are not uniform, I like the old things, I like that I can grab an OS map and walk anywhere in the country, I like that within a few hours I can be in another part of the country - not another suburb, I like that the climate is temperate and all I need to consider is whether I wear a coat or not, I like going to a pub and not having table service, I like having trains that go to most places etc.
 

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Indeed all valid points!

I am a Brit who returned three years ago with my husband who lived in the U.K. many years ago and had strong ties to England, especially London.

I understand about the size of the houses/flats here and we could do with more space but I like not having to do much housework! But if you are accustomed to living in a larger house, then I can understand this issue would be annoying.

The cut in pay would be very discouraging if we worked but as we are retired, that does not affect us.

Funnily enough, we find the weather is much better than we anticipated. We live in London and downpours of heavy rain are infrequent. Yes we get some drizzly, miserable days but we seem to get many more days of sun than we expected. This is proven by the fact I have to water my plants nearly every day!

Yes, real estate is expensive. We were lucky that we purchased this small flat in 1992 without any intention of coming back here to live. It is now almost the perfect place for us. It cost £62,000 in 1992 and is now worth around £500,000. Not that you would believe that to look at it!

Not everyone is into the pub drinking culture. None of my family or my children is.

The bottom line is, if you are not happy here, you might have to consider returning to Canada but it seems your partner is well settled in his job, so that might be difficult. Are there any positive aspects you appreciate that you could maybe focus on? I have lived in three different countries and there were always things I did not like but I wanted and needed to be happy, so, by choice, I was!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lots of British people emigrate to Canada for the reasons you mention. Plus the appeal of being able to drive everywhere.

Personally, I like living in the UK for the opposite reasons. I like to be able to walk from A to B, not need a car and not cross 6 lane highways, I like that the street plans and architecture are not uniform, I like the old things, I like that I can grab an OS map and walk anywhere in the country, I like that within a few hours I can be in another part of the country - not another suburb, I like that the climate is temperate and all I need to consider is whether I wear a coat or not, I like going to a pub and not having table service, I like having trains that go to most places etc.
Unfortunately these are all things I dislike, wish I was different in this aspect :faint:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Indeed all valid points!

I am a Brit who returned three years ago with my husband who lived in the U.K. many years ago and had strong ties to England, especially London.

I understand about the size of the houses/flats here and we could do with more space but I like not having to do much housework! But if you are accustomed to living in a larger house, then I can understand this issue would be annoying.

The cut in pay would be very discouraging if we worked but as we are retired, that does not affect us.

Funnily enough, we find the weather is much better than we anticipated. We live in London and downpours of heavy rain are infrequent. Yes we get some drizzly, miserable days but we seem to get many more days of sun than we expected. This is proven by the fact I have to water my plants nearly every day!

Yes, real estate is expensive. We were lucky that we purchased this small flat in 1992 without any intention of coming back here to live. It is now almost the perfect place for us. It cost £62,000 in 1992 and is now worth around £500,000. Not that you would believe that to look at it!

Not everyone is into the pub drinking culture. None of my family or my children is.

The bottom line is, if you are not happy here, you might have to consider returning to Canada but it seems your partner is well settled in his job, so that might be difficult. Are there any positive aspects you appreciate that you could maybe focus on? I have lived in three different countries and there were always things I did not like but I wanted and needed to be happy, so, by choice, I was!
Having a positive outlook is a huge part of adjusting well so I do try to stay positive, most times :p

My husband's work is the only reason we are staying here, his business venture is successful and continues to grow. Negative to this is...it's a joint venture with his brother so profits are split. Even his family wanted to move out to Canada but couldn't due to their parents being unwell.

Well I plan to stick it out for a while longer and see if things change. I just don't find many Americans or Canadians who stay here in the long term for logical reasons such as housing, expenses and pay. Most stay for the love of history, not needing vehicles to get around places etc.
 

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Housing prices in Vancouver aren't going down and I doubt that they will any time soon... there's no more room, what with the Pacific on one side and the Coast Mountain range on the other... heck, when a burnt out and condemned house in East Vancouver can sell for CAD $1000000+ (yes, one million for a burnt out house - a burnt out house!!!) then you know it's only he land that the buyer is interested in... I know that I certainly couldn't afford to live out there... even the neibourhood where I grew up, the houses are 40+ years old and they're listening at prices in excess of upper six figures... my husband and I are home owners here in the UK but we wouldn't be able to buy out there (I was an Rx Tech before I left and even if I got my old job (a unionised hospital pharmacy gig) we couldn't service a mortgage on my salary alone).

As much as I would absolutely love to raise my daughter on the shores of the Pacific, on the south coast of BC (with regular visits to see her cousins in Hog Town in the summer holidays) the cost of living and mine and my husband's (in)ability to afford it make it nothing more than a pipe dream.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Housing prices in Vancouver aren't going down and I doubt that they will any time soon... there's no more room, what with the Pacific on one side and the Coast Mountain range on the other... heck, when a burnt out and condemned house in East Vancouver can sell for CAD $1000000+ (yes, one million for a burnt out house - a burnt out house!!!) then you know it's only he land that the buyer is interested in... I know that I certainly couldn't afford to live out there... even the neibourhood where I grew up, the houses are 40+ years old and they're listening at prices in excess of upper six figures... my husband and I are home owners here in the UK but we wouldn't be able to buy out there (I was an Rx Tech before I left and even if I got my old job (a unionised hospital pharmacy gig) we couldn't service a mortgage on my salary alone).

As much as I would absolutely love to raise my daughter on the shores of the Pacific, on the south coast of BC (with regular visits to see her cousins in Hog Town in the summer holidays) the cost of living and mine and my husband's (in)ability to afford it make it nothing more than a pipe dream.
Vancouver has always been a tough and expensive market. I'm lucky that I have a very well paying career to go back to in Canada and live in a reasonably affordable city which is still not very far from Toronto (St.Catharines, ON).

With the new mortgage and taxes being put into place there has been a huge slow down in the sales and with time a change in price.

Vancouver’s real estate market will keep falling: BCREA | Globalnews.ca

But this "cool down" will take time, I'm talking a few years down the line. Vancouver, especially North Van, will continue to be expensive that's just always been the case.

I hope your dream of raising a family in BC will become a reality, it's a beautiful place.
 

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1. The houses are tiny. I'm from Southern Ontario and the houses here are large, spacious and modern. We have separate rooms for our laundry and a huge basement for recreational purposes. My husband's family who live there also have similar large spacious homes. I have not seen a single home in England that can compare to this standard of living and it's honestly getting me down. I know this may sound bratty but when you're used to living a certain way, it's hard to adjust. (Population - Canada less than 40 million vs UK 65 million - UK very small on map while Canada covers half a continent)

2. THE PAY! I was a pharmacy in Canada and paid very well (on avg pharmacists are paid 110k+ in Canada). I received a job here recently and the pay is quite frankly a slap in the face. I will be taking a huge pay cut, being paid around £30k a year. I found most jobs pay a lot less here. (UK - EU freedom of movement in services meant that pharmacists qualified in an EEA country can get automatic recognition route - so there could be a large pool of pharmacists)

I would suggest you stay in the UK until you get British Citizenship. It only takes 5 years in total if you are married to your British Citizen partner.

Don't think about your experience in this country as a 'mistake', after all, you are with someone you love. It is going to take time to get used to a new environment. Good luck to the OP!
 

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I just don't find many Americans or Canadians who stay here in the long term for logical reasons such as housing, expenses and pay. Most stay for the love of history, not needing vehicles to get around places etc.
It's harsh to describe that as logic. It is just different tastes.

It might help if you are able to say what it is you like to do other than living in a big house. Hobbies etc.
 

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Maybe view the travel opportunities as a positive. UK is so well connected to rest of Europe and really the rest of the world, and flight prices seems to never go much beyond £500 quid for a return journey to most places.

So essentially, living in Canada, for a thousand miles, all you have is Cananda (most of it unpopulated and natural). But for living in the UK, for a thousand miles, you get the one of the oldest, richest continents on the planet?

Just an idea. Might help with the doldrums when/if you face them.

You can have one weekend in Venice, the next in Rome and a third in Amsterdam, quite easily, and even on a budget. While you are confined to life in UK due to love, just travel as much and as far as your money and circumstances allow. So when and if you do go back to Canada, you can at least boast that you have seen all of Europe.
 

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PPS- if you don't mind the countryside and working remotely is possible for your husband, consider moving to a more rural location. Huge , quirky houses for not a very high price. The North is essentially cheaper to live in overall too and yet many of the countryside/suburban areas are so close and well connected to larger cities that you hardly feel the pinch.

For instance, I have always always been a big city dweller. All my life. Living in a small English town now allows my husband and I a decent 3 bedroom house (in our mid 20s) with a large garden, at the same time as being a mere 35 minute drive from a huge city centre.
 

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PPS- if you don't mind the countryside and working remotely is possible for your husband, consider moving to a more rural location. Huge , quirky houses for not a very high price.
Do you have any recommendations on locations? I work remotely but have been unable to find any detached countryside houses for less than about £400k (even in the North, though not willing to go TOO far north). I make about £60k on my salary alone, which is probably higher than average, but that is still not comfortably affordable at this point. I'm really getting stifled by the lack of living/outdoor space here, and constant noise/people...
 

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I just want to say that I feel you, and I'm sorry you're feeling like this. And I don't intend upon hijacking your thread, but I want to share this with you so maybe you don't feel alone.

I've been living here for nine months, have been sorely missing Canada, and I'm wondering if I made a huge--and very expensive--mistake. I have permanent residency in Canada, and that expires in 2021. I didn't want to leave there because I was very happy with where I lived and having very close friends, but my husband said it was either I move to England or we file for divorce. I moved here because I wanted to be with him, but I feel really detached and homesick. I feel it's not at all fair for me to feel this way, but I can't seem to stop it.

All I can suggest is try to travel. See the British countryside as much as you can. Hop on over to neat places in Europe--weekend adventures are often fairly inexpensive, especially in places such as Dubrovnik and Prague. You won't get that opportunity if/when you return to Canada, so soak it all up now and see if you end up feeling any differently. I'm trying to see this as an adventure that I can look back on and remember fondly.
 
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Hi Clever ,

I am not hugely knowledegeable outside of my own personal experience but I'd recommend looking at all large cities and their suburbs , up to 50 mile radius.

You will be surprised at what you find. And dont limit your search to places with proximity to the south. Try looking at it from a different perspective of enjoying what that particular place does have to offer.

For instance old mining towns are a very good place for larger properties. Or taking up a project. A house that basically needs all kinds of work but you have time to invest in it.

I mean all this is very subjective and personal so hard to advice generally but keep considering at new ideas. Life is too short to live it miserably and we are some of the lucky few in this world who enjoy the privilege that is immigration. We got this guys !
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's harsh to describe that as logic. It is just different tastes.

It might help if you are able to say what it is you like to do other than living in a big house. Hobbies etc.
I enjoy going to the gym, which I have a membership with at Virgin Active (£70/month crazy)

Outdoor activities such as hiking and canoeing

Travelling as well which I have done as much of I can. My husband gets very little time off since his work is essentially 24/7.

Interior design is a passion of mine, which is explains my interest in real estate and home decor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I just want to say that I feel you, and I'm sorry you're feeling like this. And I don't intend upon hijacking your thread, but I want to share this with you so maybe you don't feel alone.

I've been living here for nine months, have been sorely missing Canada, and I'm wondering if I made a huge--and very expensive--mistake. I have permanent residency in Canada, and that expires in 2021. I didn't want to leave there because I was very happy with where I lived and having very close friends, but my husband said it was either I move to England or we file for divorce. I moved here because I wanted to be with him, but I feel really detached and homesick. I feel it's not at all fair for me to feel this way, but I can't seem to stop it.

All I can suggest is try to travel. See the British countryside as much as you can. Hop on over to neat places in Europe--weekend adventures are often fairly inexpensive, especially in places such as Dubrovnik and Prague. You won't get that opportunity if/when you return to Canada, so soak it all up now and see if you end up feeling any differently. I'm trying to see this as an adventure that I can look back on and remember fondly.
I can't wait to travel Europe, I think that is a great positive!

Hopefully you go back to Canada before your PR expires, especially as immigration reforms in Canada are getting stricter.
 

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I enjoy going to the gym, which I have a membership with at Virgin Active (£70/month crazy)

Outdoor activities such as hiking and canoeing

Travelling as well which I have done as much of I can. My husband gets very little time off since his work is essentially 24/7.

Interior design is a passion of mine, which is explains my interest in real estate and home decor.

Well, I think the UK is better for hiking (see earlier comment about OS map) and much much better for travelling than Canada. Sadly, canoeing is out - nowhere else really has the number of lakes that Canada does!

I'm sure there are some interior design things to do. I have no interest in it, so can't really advise on that.
 

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I don't think anyone could say your points are unreasonable, we all like what we like! I understand how you feel about the space issue (I'm also from southern Ontario), although my problem isn't necessarily with the smaller space, it's usually how it's laid out that drives me crazy! Small spaces can look a lot bigger if done properly, but I often find homes in England just look smaller than they actually are because of how it's all laid out. But that's part of the "charm" of living here, the Brits are about preservation not innovation when it comes to their homes :)

I also agree that the pay is difficult to deal with, especially since it's such an expensive place to live. My husband was given a home by his grandfather when he passed away so we're living there, a place we could never dream of living in if we had to pay for it ourselves! I did my Master's here in the UK and I've always been disappointed with how little you make, even with this level of education (especially since my husband has no uni degree and he makes substantially more than me, although it's my own fault for going into such an over-saturated field).

However, when it came time to decide where to live, the UK or Canada, we both chose the UK. Mostly because a) there were more job prospects for me here (a low-paying job is better to me than the no job I had in Canada!), and b) (and really the #1 reason) so we could travel so easily. I love travelling and having Europe at our doorstep is reason enough for me to stay here. Bundle that with all the vacation you get here compared to Canada and it made the most sense for us.

I think you need to do what makes you happy. You want to support your partner and that includes encouraging their business, however you can't continue to be unhappy for the sake of a career. I would agree that you still need to give it time, and try and focus on the positive aspects and really work on those (including maybe doing a bit of travelling on your own or with friends if your partner can't join you). If after awhile your feelings haven't changed then you need to communicate with your partner, and if they can see that you really have been trying to make the most of living in the UK but it's still not working, maybe they'll be more willing to consider a move to Canada.
 

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I have been in England for 18 months and just shake the feeling that this move was a huge mistake. I moved to join my partner here who has a successful business which at the moment can't change base.

Reasons why I don't like it:

1. The houses are tiny. I'm from Southern Ontario and the houses here are large, spacious and modern. We have separate rooms for our laundry and a huge basement for recreational purposes. My husband's family who live there also have similar large spacious homes. I have not seen a single home in England that can compare to this standard of living and it's honestly getting me down. I know this may sound bratty but when you're used to living a certain way, it's hard to adjust.

2. THE PAY! I was a pharmacy in Canada and paid very well (on avg pharmacists are paid 110k+ in Canada). I received a job here recently and the pay is quite frankly a slap in the face. I will be taking a huge pay cut, being paid around £30k a year. I found most jobs pay a lot less here.

3. The weather, I know it get's cold in Canada but at least we have proper summers. The sun is rarely out here and the so called summer is 20 degrees.

4. The expenses. Real estate in and around Toronto and Vancouver has shot up recently (I see this going back to normal eventually) but I lived in an area where the housing is still affordable. I could never dream of living in a 4500 square foot home like the ones my parents own over here.

5. Brits always say the Canada as a whole is dull (if you live outside large metro areas). I enjoy a family based lifestyle, I don't like the idea of the drinking culture out here. The excessive pub drinking by men well into their 60s is pathetic to me.

Am i being negative or are these real reasons to reconsider my move?

What reasons led you to move to the UK?
Hi,

I believe you should look around for a new job in Pharmaceuticals. You are a native speaker and have experience in the field - you should have several offers with much higher salary than you are describing!
 
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