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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've lived in Fukushima Ken for 17 years. When I got divorced with the Japanese national, in 2007 my contribution had stopped. I got remarried to a Polish national but last 2008 I went back to Japan and discovered that I have my statement bill for about 189,000 yen which left unpaid from the year 2008-2012 . I was jobless since I've got divorced in 2007, I couldn't pay so I just brought all the statement bills with me and my pension book back to Poland. My questions are:

1. If I will just leave this like that, without paying nothing anymore and only rely on the contributions which was paid by my previous husband, how will my pension look like?

2. Do I still have to pay these bills what I'm holding now? I am now 46 years old, If I am going to pay which I think it's ridiculous to do so, what age will I receive it or what year, and what amount in yen it will be?

3. How much my pension will grow if I pay this 160 000 which is equivalent to 7,000 zloty (Polish money) now, is it worth to pay this since am not working and staying in Japan? or would I have more bills to pay?

4. "After having paid into the pension system for 25 years, the insured person, after reaching 65 years of age will be eligible for a pension until their death. The 25 year period of payments is not always truly 25 years. Kara kikan (which counts your years outside of Japan) affects your right to receive a Japanese pension without 25 years of payment, if you are granted permanent residency before you reach 65.” This statement is based to Tuesday, June 21, 2011 Permanent residents, mind the 'gap years' in your pension payments by ASHLEY THOMPSON. In my case would I be entitled or would I be qualified for the Kara Kikan system if I am going to apply?

By April this year, I'm going to JP to visit my daughters, for re-entry renewal and clear up my pension which my ex-husband contributed for 15 years. But the problem is that I still have 180,000 yen to pay which was left unpaid from the year 2008 - 2012. Considering the exchange rate of zloty against yen is triple high. Could I apply a "kara kikan" means "gap years" to qualify for an exemption from contributions for being unemployed in Japan? I hope I am getting the right options. I would be really grateful enough if anyone can share me some advises before my travel.
 

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I've lived in Fukushima Ken for 17 years. When I got divorced with the Japanese national, in 2007 my contribution had stopped.
Why? Just because you are no longer married to a Japanese, that does not mean you can avoid making pension payments.

I got remarried to a Polish national but last 2008 I went back to Japan and discovered that I have my statement bill for about 189,000 yen which left unpaid from the year 2008-2012 .
See? They expected you to pay all that time.

I was jobless since I've got divorced in 2007, I couldn't pay
This is something you need to explain to the ward office where you got the statement (or where you live in Japan now, so they can contact that office).

1. If I will just leave this like that, without paying nothing anymore and only rely on the contributions which was paid by my previous husband, how will my pension look like?
It appears that your previous husband has not made any payments on your behalf. If you want to get back on the pension system here, those backpayments (or arrangements to reduce them) will have to be made.

2. Do I still have to pay these bills what I'm holding now? I am now 46 years old, If I am going to pay which I think it's ridiculous to do so, what age will I receive it or what year, and what amount in yen it will be?
See above for answer to your first question here. As for it being ridiculous, it was your own fault for not talking to the ward office when you left here, so that you would know what to expect. Since there is now a 4-5 year gap in your pension payments, it is up to the ward office to decide what to do. I predict 2 options:

1) You will be allowed to continue on the pension plan as if nothing has happened, providing you settle matters on the current backpayments.

2) You will have to start making payments all over again and have to put in for 25 years in order to start collecting. By the way, did you ever get Permanent Resident status? If so, and it has not lapsed, you might be able to take 20 years off that number.

3. How much my pension will grow if I pay this 160 000 which is equivalent to 7,000 zloty (Polish money) now, is it worth to pay this since am not working and staying in Japan? or would I have more bills to pay?
Only your ward office can explain your options. Just don't go in there angry and aggressive. That will only make matters worse.

4. "After having paid into the pension system for 25 years, the insured person, after reaching 65 years of age will be eligible for a pension until their death. The 25 year period of payments is not always truly 25 years. Kara kikan (which counts your years outside of Japan) affects your right to receive a Japanese pension without 25 years of payment, if you are granted permanent residency before you reach 65.” This statement is based to Tuesday, June 21, 2011 Permanent residents, mind the 'gap years' in your pension payments by ASHLEY THOMPSON. In my case would I be entitled or would I be qualified for the Kara Kikan system if I am going to apply?
Ward office will have answers.

By April this year, I'm going to JP
I'm confused. You said you returned in 2008. At that time they gave you a bill for time up to 2012. Makes no mathematical sense.

Where are you now?
What was your time in and outside Japan?
What is your visa status or status of residence?

to visit my daughters, for re-entry renewal
This sounds as if you still have some sort of active status of residence, and you are holding a reentry permit that is due to expire, but that you want to extend/renew. Is that right? Be advised that as of July this year, if you have a valid status of residence, you can leave Japan without any reentry permit for a year. Beyond that time, you will need the reentry permit.

Good luck.
 

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I'd look into getting a "National Pension Payment Rebate" which is for gaijins to get a portion of it back when they leave Japan and don't plan on living here again.
 

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Yes, Rube, that is a good idea if she is not planning on staying in Japan.

However, if she left more than 2 years ago, she cannot apply for it, and if she already has PR, she cannot apply. Don't know her exact circumstances, but this is important to know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your reactions...

Why? Just because you are no longer married to a Japanese, that does not mean you can avoid making pension payments.

See? They expected you to pay all that time.

This is something you need to explain to the ward office where you got the statement (or where you live in Japan now, so they can contact that office).

It appears that your previous husband has not made any payments on your behalf. If you want to get back on the pension system here, those backpayments (or arrangements to reduce them) will have to be made.

See above for answer to your first question here. As for it being ridiculous, it was your own fault for not talking to the ward office when you left here, so that you would know what to expect. Since there is now a 4-5 year gap in your pension payments, it is up to the ward office to decide what to do. I predict 2 options:

1) You will be allowed to continue on the pension plan as if nothing has happened, providing you settle matters on the current backpayments.

2) You will have to start making payments all over again and have to put in for 25 years in order to start collecting. By the way, did you ever get Permanent Resident status? If so, and it has not lapsed, you might be able to take 20 years off that number.

Only your ward office can explain your options. Just don't go in there angry and aggressive. That will only make matters worse.

Ward office will have answers.

I'm confused. You said you returned in 2008. At that time they gave you a bill for time up to 2012. Makes no mathematical sense.

Where are you now?
What was your time in and outside Japan?
What is your visa status or status of residence?

This sounds as if you still have some sort of active status of residence, and you are holding a reentry permit that is due to expire, but that you want to extend/renew. Is that right? Be advised that as of July this year, if you have a valid status of residence, you can leave Japan without any reentry permit for a year. Beyond that time, you will need the reentry permit.

Good luck.
Let me give you further clarifications which I guessed made you confused... and sorry for not being so cleared of this situation.

I was and still a PR in Japan until now. In 2008 I have been in Japan for the renewal of my PR visa and tried to settle some daughters custody but since it was further difficult and was advised by my attorney to stop the case for some reasons, I went back to Poland in August, 2009. But before leaving JP, I went to my local ward and tried to clear up about my pension. That was the time I knew that I still have bills to pay from 2008-2012. Since I was leaving the next day and got no money to pay, I just got my pension book which is declaring the statement bills that my ex-husband paid from 1992-2007 in June (6-months right after my divorced with him). What surprised me after I read my pension book and realized and asked why I still have the bills of 2010-2012 when at that time I left JP it was just 2009. Thinking that this maybe an advance payment if I wish to pay, this prompted me to really go and talk to my local ward to apply for a payment exemption, if I am right.

From that 2009 until now I'm in Poland. This year next month, I'm flying back to JP to visit my daughters-hopefully, if I can get through, and to make payment arrangement to my pension and the renewal of my re-entry. But you've mentioned that "as of July this year, if you have a valid status of residence, you can leave Japan without any reentry permit for a year. Beyond that time, you will need the reentry permit," then this could be helpful.

What is this exactly? Where can I get the up to date information about this? I've been checking my embassy as I was reluctant even to go thinking that I have to miss my classes here in PL just for a short period of time but I didn't find or know something like this. If this is happening, then I think I wouldn't need to go to JP for 4 days mission just to get clarification about my pension and renewal? What I know is that JP embassy in Warsaw had offered a year for a renewal of visa and re-entry for a year and only for those who are victims in Fukushima prefecture. We called the embassy last January this year to know if I can do it but I was denied because I still have one year before my re-entry expired.
 

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Information on the July 2012 changes that will take place regarding alien registration:
News article from The Japan Times
Immigration changes to come as new law takes effect in July | The Japan Times Online

Official immigration announcement.
To all foreign nationals residing in Japan?Beginning on Monday, July 9, 2012,?Start of a new residency management system!

By the way, you are confusing me even more. You wrote about renewing your PR visa.
1) PR is not a visa.
2) After you get PR, you never EVER have to renew it. The only thing you have to renew is the reentry permit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re-entry Permit

Information on the July 2012 changes that will take place regarding alien registration:
News article from The Japan Times
Immigration changes to come as new law takes effect in July | The Japan Times Online

Official immigration announcement.
To all foreign nationals residing in Japan?Beginning on Monday, July 9, 2012,?Start of a new residency management system!

By the way, you are confusing me even more. You wrote about renewing your PR visa.
1) PR is not a visa.
2) After you get PR, you never EVER have to renew it. The only thing you have to renew is the reentry permit.
Sorry for the confusion again.
1)Yes, I'm just going to renew my re-entry permit and to clear up some pension issues. Unfortunately, the maximum validity period of a re-entry permit issued after implementation of the new system is to be "5 years," instead of the current "3 years" and that will be implemented on July 9th, 2012 which I guess I couldn't avail yet on April since I would be coming back to PL right away on the same month.

2) I have an Alien Registration Card which I've been renewing every 5 years. It will be expired on 2014. Fortunately, the period in which an alien registration certificate is deemed to be equivalent to the resident card will take effect as of July 9, 2012.
According to the Justice Ministry, foreign residents can apply for the new card at their nearest regional immigration office beginning Jan. 13 but won't receive it until July. However, valid alien registration certificates will be acceptable until the cardholder's next application for a visa extension takes place. Permanent residents, meanwhile, will have to apply for a new residence card within three years from July 2012. Medium- and long-term residents newly arriving in Japan will be given an application form for a residence card.

Thanks for the links you gave. Now I have a clear understanding on what to do when I get back to Jp next month. This is what I've read from the links you've shared.
 
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