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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few things that I have found interesting:

My neighbour Juan is a lovely man, always ready to help. He once forbade me to do anything relating to repairs to my car as 'las mujeres no entienden nada de estas cosas'.
I spoke to a meeting of CCOO about setting up equality structures. I asked the women what their biggest problem in the workplace was. The reply: 'Los hombres'.
I got myself a more up-to-date Ipad and gave my old one to a Moroccan friend. He wanted advice on how to use it so went to the Apple shop in La Canada. The Spanish assistant asked him for proof that he was the owner, for a receipt or some proof of purchase and as he had none refused to help him. I suspect that would not have happened to me.

Are these examples typical, frequent or rare, I wonder. As I have been in Spain a mere seven years, my experiences aren't that extensive. I have to say that I personally wasn't offended by Juan's comments as he saved me 100 euros on a new LR battery by buying it for me at a large store in San Pedro poligono. I would have saved more but I insisted on a warranty and receipt with IVA included.
I must be a very faint-hearted feminist (if one at all) as I'm happy to be patronised if I can save that much money.
Wondering wat PW and others think....
 

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It's commonplace for Spanish neighbours and acquaintances to speak to my husband rather than to me, although I often have to translate what they say for him.:) He is always addressed by his name and with the informal "tu", whereas I am "Señora" and called "ustéd".

I have experienced Spanish guys stopping me doing jobs sometimes, like physically taking a paintbrush out of my hand when painting an outside wall of the house, and insisting on finishing them off for me.

Not long after we bought the house, my OH went to buy an ironing board from the shops and got a volley of wolfwhistles on the way back, it obviously wasn't the done thing to be seen carrying one.:D

We're not offended, just find it amusing.
 

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I was once in a meeting with senior managers (Spanish), where my role was being discussed, with me taking an active part of the discussion, as you would expect.

Although the individual in question did half try to be polite and say that she was not commenting on my own abaility to do my job, she did say "no entiendo por qué no hemos contratado un Español para ese puesto"... (I don't understand why we didn't recruit a Spaniard for this position).

Of course, this is not racism, nor is it even xenophobia, maybe not even discrimination, its simply that there are less inhibitions in Spanish culture about raising nationalities in situations where the over PC UK would have Trade Unions getting involved and disciplinary hearings by HR.
 

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Have to agree Overandout

Uk is too PC

Take my local filling station- signs absolutely everywhere " You cannot smoke here"- political correctness/ nanny state gone mad
 

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What gets me are the phone calls from our banks (BBVA and La Caixa). All of our accounts are joint accounts, but they always ask for my husband. If he's not home and I tell them that and say that I can take the call as I'm also an account holder, they always say no and that they'll call later to speak to him. Now how am I supposed to interpret that??? I find it massively insulting, especially because in our house I am the one who takes care of all the banking and finances. :mad:
 

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What gets me are the phone calls from our banks (BBVA and La Caixa). All of our accounts are joint accounts, but they always ask for my husband. If he's not home and I tell them that and say that I can take the call as I'm also an account holder, they always say no and that they'll call later to speak to him. Now how am I supposed to interpret that??? I find it massively insulting, especially because in our house I am the one who takes care of all the banking and finances. :mad:
Now that would annoy me. An insurance salesman once called at my door in the UK and said "hello love, is the boss in?". He looked quite taken aback by my reaction.:D
 

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THis happened to me in the UK

I went to a Garage to look at a new car, When I finally decided on a nice shiny new BMW the sales guy asked if I wanted to discuss it with my husband!

I Left

Purchased an MX5 instead
 

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Speaking from our own point of view, we haven't encountered it. We tend to be treated equally or if not, SWMBO takes precedence over me because she speaks fluent Spanish. We treat each other on an equal footing and I think others see that and it reflects on their attitude towards us. I am a feminist anyway and will always make sure SWMBO is first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
THis happened to me in the UK

I went to a Garage to look at a new car, When I finally decided on a nice shiny new BMW the sales guy asked if I wanted to discuss it with my husband!

I Left

Purchased an MX5 instead
I had to laugh at that. I had an MX 5 too, loved it...and I was told it was a 'girly' or 'hairdressers' car' by men.
Sold it to a friend, got a BMW M3 cabrio. No further comments.


I don't get offended by sexist comments, neither do I find those who object to people objecting to them 'PC'. 'PC' to me means merely being polite and considerate of the feelings of others and not using terms such as poof, yid, ****** and so on, or calling grown women 'girls'.
I actually think it's helpful to hear the occasional comment of that type as it serves as a reminder that Neanderthal attitudes still exist. Occasionally women on this Forum are addressed as 'Lynn girl' or 'Mary girl'.....imagine women referring to men as 'Tony boy' or 'Baldy boy'. Of course, you can't. But I find it amusing.
That sort of thing is ultimately harmless but incidents such as the one involving my friend aren't. That is more than xenophobia. Does anyone think a British or German person who have been treated like that? It leaves a nasty taste. I shan't be patronising that store.
 

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What gets me are the phone calls from our banks (BBVA and La Caixa). All of our accounts are joint accounts, but they always ask for my husband. If he's not home and I tell them that and say that I can take the call as I'm also an account holder, they always say no and that they'll call later to speak to him. Now how am I supposed to interpret that??? I find it massively insulting, especially because in our house I am the one who takes care of all the banking and finances. :mad:
Oh joy, I wear hearing aids and cannot use the phone, my wife does all the phone work and in return I do all the face to face stuff. We're going to have fun. :lol:
 

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Occasionally women on this Forum are addressed as 'Lynn girl' or 'Mary girl'.....imagine women referring to men as 'Tony boy' or 'Baldy boy'. Of course, you can't. But I find it amusing.
Is it wrong I lol'd at baldy boy, sorry. I have yet to experience this but I will be watching for it now. Of course I may have just missed it as when looking at houses the agents were chattering in Spanish and I was only getting every fifth word! :rolleyes:
 

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We were in Movistar recently trying to get Fusion (another story entirely). Anyway, with the deal came a router which we had to set up ourselves. The sales assistant (female) started by talking to my wife (fluent in Spanish), then went on to me as it got more technical and then finally to my son on how to set up the router for WiFi around the house etc.

Apparently there's a pecking order when it comes to technology;
  1. Children
  2. Men
  3. Women
and this irrespective of how good their Spanish is (or Valenciano in this case) - otherwise I would have been at the bottom of the list!
 

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We were in Movistar recently trying to get Fusion (another story entirely). Anyway, with the deal came a router which we had to set up ourselves. The sales assistant (female) started by talking to my wife (fluent in Spanish), then went on to me as it got more technical and then finally to my son on how to set up the router for WiFi around the house etc.

Apparently there's a pecking order when it comes to technology;
  1. Children
  2. Men
  3. Women
and this irrespective of how good their Spanish is (or Valenciano in this case) - otherwise I would have been at the bottom of the list!
Could be interesting when I arrive in Spain with a partner of 27 years and a dog. Will top dog win the day!!!
 

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A few things that I have found interesting:

My neighbour Juan is a lovely man, always ready to help. He once forbade me to do anything relating to repairs to my car as 'las mujeres no entienden nada de estas cosas'.
I spoke to a meeting of CCOO about setting up equality structures. I asked the women what their biggest problem in the workplace was. The reply: 'Los hombres'.
I got myself a more up-to-date Ipad and gave my old one to a Moroccan friend. He wanted advice on how to use it so went to the Apple shop in La Canada. The Spanish assistant asked him for proof that he was the owner, for a receipt or some proof of purchase and as he had none refused to help him. I suspect that would not have happened to me.

Are these examples typical, frequent or rare, I wonder. As I have been in Spain a mere seven years, my experiences aren't that extensive. I have to say that I personally wasn't offended by Juan's comments as he saved me 100 euros on a new LR battery by buying it for me at a large store in San Pedro poligono. I would have saved more but I insisted on a warranty and receipt with IVA included.
I must be a very faint-hearted feminist (if one at all) as I'm happy to be patronised if I can save that much money.
Wondering wat PW and others think....
Our Spanish neighbours (in their sixties) have very strict rules: women clean and cook, men work on the land and earn the money! However, younger Spaniards seem more enlightened and of several couples that we know, the wives are the main breadwinners and the husbands help with cooking and cleaning. On the question of racism, every Spanish friend we have appears to dislike North African Muslims. Our nearest town has quite a large Muslim community who are employed in textile factories on low wages (well below the legal minimum after their employers deduct extortionate accommodation costs!). The children go to local schools and don´t speak Spanish which, our friends tell us, hinders the education of local children. In fact it´s much the same story that we used to hear so often in the UK!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Is it wrong I lol'd at baldy boy, sorry. I have yet to experience this but I will be watching for it now. Of course I may have just missed it as when looking at houses the agents were chattering in Spanish and I was only getting every fifth word! :rolleyes:
If I replied to a post of yours by addressing you as 'Simon boy' it would seem to me as if I were one of those white South Africans who kept their servants in sheds at the bottom of their gardens or some white plantation slave owner out of 'Gone With the Wind'.
I can stick up for myself if I'm offended by anything so I just laugh at the silliness of some people. It's equally silly to over-react, as imo happened in the case of the poor old science prof at some Oxford college who got sacked for making daft comments.
I used to do classes on gender and race stereotyping with teenagers. One thing we did was to reverse roles and subject the males to the kind of sexist comments routinely directed at young females. That was amusing and revealing.
There is an anecdote in the book by social anthropologist Kate Fox, 'Watching the English', which made me laugh:

Male 1, commenting on nearby well-endowed female: 'Cor! Not many of those to the pound, eh..'
Male 2: Ssh..you can't say that anymore, mate. S'not allowed any more'.
Male 1: 'What??? Don't give me that PC feminist crap! I can talk about a girl's tits if I like'.
Male 2: 'Nah....it's not the feminists'll get you, it's the Weights and Measures lot. We can't use pounds any more, it's all metric now. You gotta say 'kilos''.


She swears this is what she overheard in a pub.
 

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I have experienced Spanish guys stopping me doing jobs sometimes, like physically taking a paintbrush out of my hand when painting an outside wall of the house, and insisting on finishing them off for me.
Now that's an opportunity to exploit, not get offended. I used to take advantage of it with Latinos. I'm glad Spaniards are still that sexist. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Now that's an opportunity to exploit, not get offended. I used to take advantage of it with Latinos. I'm glad Spaniards are still that sexist. :)
Working with mechanics gave us many opportunities to observe everyday sexism. Once Sandra overheard a couple of the guys discussing a female customer whom they had known since school days. The general view was that she had 'let herself go'. They were genuinely confused and puzzled when Sandra suggested they take a look at themselves in the mirror.
Another time I decided to paint the walls of the foyer outside the works canteen/restroom. I couldn't help hearing conversations in which f and c words made up a good half of what was said.
A drop of paint fell off the brush into my eye and it stung so I involuntarily let fly a volley of curses. The door opened and one of the most foul-mouthed guys came out and told me in genuinely shocked and offended terms that I really shouldn't be using that kind of language.
 

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My OH experienced a little trouble renting an apartment here due to skin color.

I got myself a more up-to-date Ipad and gave my old one to a Moroccan friend. He wanted advice on how to use it so went to the Apple shop in La Canada. The Spanish assistant asked him for proof that he was the owner, for a receipt or some proof of purchase and as he had none refused to help him. I suspect that would not have happened to me.

Are these examples typical, frequent or rare, I wonder.
 

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I think, as in many other aspects, forty years of dictatorship and relative isolation held Spain back in terms of social attitudes. They have made huge leaps forward since though. These days, for example, it's quite normal for men to do the shopping and pick the kids up from school. Let's not confuse sexism with simple courtesy.
 
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