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I am sure we have all been told “quinze jours, deux semaines“

I think I understand why quinze jours and deux semaines are used interchangeably; a month is about 4-weeks and approximately 30 days, so half a month is 15-days or 2-weeks. But, just how long do you have to wait if told, “it will be ready in quinze jours or deux semaines? Is it an indeterminate period of time?
 

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"Quinze jours" is two weeks - and "huit jours" is one week. I think it may be used in the sense that if you are told "quinze jours" on a Tuesday, it means you should come back in two Tuesdays. Technically speaking, two weeks has elapsed on the Monday. Similarly "huit jours" on a Friday means, come back again next Friday. French logic - what can you say?
 

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It's 15 jours for a fornight and 8 jours for a week, the number of times the clock clicks to midnight - in France midnight tonight is considered to be tomorrow.

Not so strange when in the US and elsewhere New Year is celebrated at midnight :)
 

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I have no idea why some people here have so much trouble with their tradesmen - mine have always come on time.
Cause you live in a flat.....and probably make them cakes.

French Artisans....been there done that...got the picture.

Never again. :rolleyes:
 

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Cause you live in a flat.....and probably make them cakes.

French Artisans....been there done that...got the picture.

Never again. :rolleyes:
I don't make them cakes - I don't make cakes. I sometimes offer them a coffee, which they don't always accept. I did the same in Oz BTW. The biggest problem in France is getting a tradesman, followed by getting one who will tell you when he will come - which has nothing to do with 6 or 15 jours, unless they tell you not before. Of course, if you want work done outside or on a roof, weather conditions and particularly gales and storms will play a part - and not just in France.
 

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That's more than a bit offensive.
Oh come on EH, it was meant to be funny, and in any case single women need to be authorititave and demanding otherwise they get walked all over. I thought you would realise it was tongue in cheek - sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
"Quinze jours" is two weeks - and "huit jours" is one week. I think it may be used in the sense that if you are told "quinze jours" on a Tuesday, it means you should come back in two Tuesdays. Technically speaking, two weeks has elapsed on the Monday. Similarly "huit jours" on a Friday means, come back again next Friday. French logic - what can you say?
Ooops My post was some what tongue in cheek, but I seem to have started mortal combat. Sorry. A bit of searching I found an explanation from Paul Taylor.
 

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