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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Spouse's swearing should be in the next month of so. Going over the post swearing in To Do List, we were talking about her social security info needing updating:

Speaking in purely hypothetical terms: how likely is it that they would have the wrong status on her file? She got her social security number 10 years ago when she became an LPR. Going over the list of documentation required to get a social security number, how likely would it be for them to have her listed as "citizen" all this time and not "legal resident?"

a. Has anyone ever heard of this happening?

b. If the status was screwed up shouldn't it have kicked on some background check over the years?

c. Should it have shown up / flagged on her background checks performed by the USCIS when she applied for US citizenship?

d. If the status is screwed up with social-security, is it a big deal do we have to worry about them denaturalizing her or do we just fix it and go on with life?
 

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a) yes
b) no
c) no
d) take the ORIGINAL naturalization document, SS card, drivers license, wife, and lots of patience and officially change her status at the local social security office

Please remember - she needs a US passport and her original naturalization document will be required as well. It can take several weeks. So visit social security office first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
a) yes
b) no
c) no
d) take the ORIGINAL naturalization document, SS card, drivers license, wife, and lots of patience and officially change her status at the local social security office

Please remember - she needs a US passport and her original naturalization document will be required as well. It can take several weeks. So visit social security office first.
If it is messed up with the wrong status, would it cause any problems with the USCIS? Them claiming she misrepresented on her application when asked about if she ever declared US citizenship (seeing as we wouldn't know about the hypothetical mistake)? Or do we just "fix it" and not worry.
 

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If it is messed up with the wrong status, would it cause any problems with the USCIS? Them claiming she misrepresented on her application when asked about if she ever declared US citizenship (seeing as we wouldn't know about the hypothetical mistake)? Or do we just "fix it" and not worry.
It will be a "just fix it". What makes you so concerned about this if I may ask?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
It will be a "just fix it". What makes you so concerned about this if I may ask?
Couple of things:

1) We had a small "issue'" with my wife's interview: He thought she was concealing a DUI conviction cause she never got a US driver's license. He backed off since the background checks were clean, but he wasn't personally convinced cause her USCIS file had some minor (on their end) errors and he'd didn't know anyone with a state ID that wasn't a DUI conviction, but he'd recommend her anyways.

2) We called the local SSA office, and they said to bring her birth certificate, state ID, a copy of the greencard, and her foreign passport in case their are issues with her file, along with her naturalization certificate 30 days after she's sworn in.

We know she didn't lie about her status on her social security application or use fake documents to get her number. The only personal documents she had when she applied was her GC, our Marriage license, her birth certificate, and her Canadian passport and her state ID. And the SSA requires you to prove USC or legal authorization to work to get a number.

As far as we know she was 100% truthful on her N-400; if there is/was an error we'd have had no way of knowing about it. But we got to wondering if she'll get nailed for misrepresentation if the SSA stuff does have an error in it and she's been listed as a citizen for the last 1o years instead of a LPR.

So if the SSA has the wrong immigrant status (listing her as a USC for the last ten years instead of an LPR), so long as she didn't lie/provide fraudulent papers to get her number they just "update" / "fix" her status and we don't have to worry about the USCIS coming after her?
 

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I became a naturalised US citizen in 2006. I did not inform the Social Security office of my change of status.

When it came to me claiming Medicare I had to visit the local Social Security Office to prove my identity and one of the aspects was that I was still a resident alien on their records.

I had to present my naturalization certificate to change the record.

Unless YOU informed the SS of her change of status, there is no reason why the SS record is changed "automatically" from LPR to US citizen. (Do you suspect it has been changed from LPR to citizen incorrectly in the past few years?)

You need to inform them of the change from LPR to citizen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I became a naturalised US citizen in 2006. I did not inform the Social Security office of my change of status.

When it came to me claiming Medicare I had to visit the local Social Security Office to prove my identity and one of the aspects was that I was still a resident alien on their records.

I had to present my naturalization certificate to change the record.

Unless YOU informed the SS of her change of status, there is no reason why the SS record is changed "automatically" from LPR to US citizen. (Do you suspect it has been changed from LPR to citizen incorrectly in the past few years?)

You need to inform them of the change from LPR to citizen.
That's our concern is that somehow over the last 10 years she's been listed as a "Citizen" the whole time and not correctly as an LPR. And if so, if they'll be blow back from the USCIS over the mistake when we go to update her status after she's sworn in.
 

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That's our concern is that somehow over the last 10 years she's been listed as a "Citizen" the whole time and not correctly as an LPR. And if so, if they'll be blow back from the USCIS over the mistake when we go to update her status after she's sworn in.
Why don't you contact your local Social Security office and have an interview with THEM to ascertain what her status is on their records.

When I went for my interview for Medicare they told me immediately that I was still recorded as an LPR with them even though I had changed my status.

No point in worrying about what your wife's status is with SS.

Ask them.
 

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No. The Social Security Administration simply advised her on how to update their records once her U.S. citizenship is obtained, and they (quite sensibly) advised her to bring as much documentation as she can so that there's no possibility of any difficulty updating that record. That's just basic, general advice to help people visiting SSA avoid multiple trips, not necessarily a requirement for all of that documentation.

SSA did not tell her her record has the wrong status from what you've related. And if SSA has the wrong status on her file, it wouldn't matter. If USCIS is naturalizing her, USCIS is naturalizing her.

Congratulations to her on her U.S. citizenship. I hope she enjoys the ceremony. It's a special day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No. The Social Security Administration simply advised her on how to update their records once her U.S. citizenship is obtained, and they (quite sensibly) advised her to bring as much documentation as she can so that there's no possibility of any difficulty updating that record. That's just basic, general advice to help people visiting SSA avoid multiple trips, not necessarily a requirement for all of that documentation.

SSA did not tell her her record has the wrong status from what you've related. And if SSA has the wrong status on her file, it wouldn't matter. If USCIS is naturalizing her, USCIS is naturalizing her.

Congratulations to her on her U.S. citizenship. I hope she enjoys the ceremony. It's a special day.
They just told us to bring the info, they said they couldn't discuss the status over thephone. But if the status is wrong (listed as a USC for the last ten years, not LPR) we don't have to worry about the USCIS coming after her for misrepresentation on her application?
 

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One comforting fact about the US Government is that each agency/department is a little fiefdom unto itself. There is very little transfer of information between and among different government agencies. IF the SS records are wrong, it's their error and they aren't likely to go mentioning it to USCIS or any other government agency unless it's obvious that she has been using the error in her own favor all these years.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
One comforting fact about the US Government is that each agency/department is a little fiefdom unto itself. There is very little transfer of information between and among different government agencies. IF the SS records are wrong, it's their error and they aren't likely to go mentioning it to USCIS or any other government agency unless it's obvious that she has been using the error in her own favor all these years.
Cheers,
Bev
Nope. If there's an error, it's on that one spot. We've been very careful about being clear that she's a LPR and not a USC.
 

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Nobody wanted to see my DL; only GC and passport.

Stop by social security for peace of mind. These interviews can be somewhat intimidating especially when you invest time and money and a small thing such as no DL sets off red flags.

I am curious - your wife does not drive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nobody wanted to see my DL; only GC and passport.

Stop by social security for peace of mind. These interviews can be somewhat intimidating especially when you invest time and money and a small thing such as no DL sets off red flags.

I am curious - your wife does not drive?
City girl. Grew up with mass transit, so it was something that she wasn't interested in learning. She tried to learn when she first got here, but just got to nervous and wasn't able to handle the kind of traffic we get around where we live (rural area, a lot of large farm equipment and truck traffic, small two lane roads).

So from, what I'm reading in the thread, if the social security office has had her mistakenly listed as a citizen instead of a legal resident all this time, we don't have anything to worry about from the USCIS when we go to show social security her naturalization certificate?
 

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City girl. Grew up with mass transit, so it was something that she wasn't interested in learning. She tried to learn when she first got here, but just got to nervous and wasn't able to handle the kind of traffic we get around where we live (rural area, a lot of large farm equipment and truck traffic, small two lane roads).?
Can you get her in driver's ed with a local high school or start her out in save environments such as church parking lots?

So from, what I'm reading in the thread, if the social security office has had her mistakenly listed as a citizen instead of a legal resident all this time, we don't have anything to worry about from the USCIS when we go to show social security her naturalization certificate?
Yes:>)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So even if it is messed up the USCIS either isn't going to know or, if they did, do anything to her?

Can you get her in driver's ed with a local high school or start her out in save environments such as church parking lots?
It's been "discussed", the going preferred option seems to be move to a city with mass transit. The discussion is still ongoing.



That's our big worry. SSA office isn't inclined to discuss the matter till after she's sworn in: "We can't do anything till we have all her documentation and can verify"; if it's screwed up "We can handle the issue at the time we reopen the account". Going in person has been discussed, but right now it's getting the time off to do it. I don't care about the cost in and of itself. But we have two kids (maybe a third) and we'd hate to go through all this. And then we go to update her social security and a couple of months or a year later get a notice from USCIS that they're starting proceedings on her for misrepresentation.
 

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You seem exceptionally worried about this - is there something you are not telling us?

How did she enter the US and get permanent residency?
 

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That's our concern is that somehow over the last 10 years she's been listed as a "Citizen" the whole time and not correctly as an LPR. And if so, if they'll be blow back from the USCIS over the mistake when we go to update her status after she's sworn in.
You keep circling back to this. Why are you so worried about this?
You can either take time off and go with her or have a friend take her to verify what her records with social security say about her status. You will not be able to get any information by phone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You seem exceptionally worried about this - is there something you are not telling us?

How did she enter the US and get permanent residency?
She's legal. Entered on a visa waiver, didn't intend to stay--she was supposed to help me get immigrate to Canada. Found out she was pregnant and at high risk shortly before her time was up (not planned), so we did an AOS based on marriage. Zero issues on that side. But her USCIS file had "errors" in it when she went for the N-400 interview: physical, paper application said one thing, but somehow it got inputted as another in the computer--flipped numbers, typos, minor stuff that the officer (unhappily) had to fix. So my faith in govt. accuracy isn't to high right now.

Toss into it I'm a worry-wart to begin with, and we're planning on making some big changes post swearing in. We just don't want to have anything come back that'll either land her in court (we'd probably win, but it'd cost a lot, I'm betting, to fight but we'd likely win) for misrepresentation or having the family split up while we're fighting to get her allowed back in the US.
 

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She's legal. Entered on a visa waiver, didn't intend to stay--she was supposed to help me get immigrate to Canada. Found out she was pregnant and at high risk shortly before her time was up (not planned), so we did an AOS based on marriage. Zero issues on that side. But her USCIS file had "errors" in it when she went for the N-400 interview: physical, paper application said one thing, but somehow it got inputted as another in the computer--flipped numbers, typos, minor stuff that the officer (unhappily) had to fix. So my faith in govt. accuracy isn't to high right now.

Toss into it I'm a worry-wart to begin with, and we're planning on making some big changes post swearing in. We just don't want to have anything come back that'll either land her in court (we'd probably win, but it'd cost a lot, I'm betting, to fight but we'd likely win) for misrepresentation or having the family split up while we're fighting to get her allowed back in the US.
Try not to reinvent the wheel! She has had a not overly pleasant interview which she successfully passed. Concentrate on your big changes and get her swearing in over with:>)

Make sure her name is spelled correctly on the naturalization form and take a snap shot of it as soon as you can for your records.
 
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