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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all.

I obtained my PhD last year in the UK in Maths. I spent about 1 year looking for a post-doctoral position, and found one in a German University.

I now have to apply for a work permit.
There seem to be several options for it, such as the Blue card, the general non-EU work permit and the post-graduate/scientific research one.

I am not sure which to pick.

I think that the Blue card seems to be the best, but! my priority is to get the "erwerbstätigkeit gestattet" stamp on my visa, in order to take up the position.

So my questions are these:
  1. Is the Blue-card for academic jobs (i.e. Postdoc in a University) as well, or just for jobs in Industry?
  2. Is it more difficult to obtain the Blue-card, if you have the required qualifications (i.e. is the rejection rate higher or lower, once they accept the application at the embassy).
  3. Is "erwerbstätigkeit gestattet"?

Bonus question (and less important), if you speak fluid German, can you apply for indefinite leave to remain type visa in Germany after 21 months of having a blue card?

I have you all in advance for the help.
Cheers.
 

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For a post-doc, I think you just apply for the scientific/research visa. The Blue Card is something different. But you should confirm by asking the university for assistance - you likely aren't the first foreigner they've had to deal with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did ask them, but they did not seem to know it. They said that all they cared was that I was allowed to work (i.e. that "erwerbstätigkeit gestattet" was stamped on my visa).

I am not the first foreigner that they had working there, but I guess they expect us to take care of it ourselves.

What is the bluecard then, if I may ask?

Anyway.
Thanks for answering.

P.S.
Assuming they accept my application for a bluecard at the embassy, is it a good idea to do it? or is the rejection rate much higher, even if "meet the minimal requirements", so to speak.

Cheers.
 

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I did ask them, but they did not seem to know it. They said that all they cared was that I was allowed to work (i.e. that "erwerbstätigkeit gestattet" was stamped on my visa).

I am not the first foreigner that they had working there, but I guess they expect us to take care of it ourselves.

What is the bluecard then, if I may ask?

Anyway.
Thanks for answering.

P.S.
Assuming they accept my application for a bluecard at the embassy, is it a good idea to do it? or is the rejection rate much higher, even if "meet the minimal requirements", so to speak.

Cheers.
The Blue Card has some advantages and disadvantages when compared to a regular work permit.

Advantages: spouses get instant full access to the job market and don't need to show language skills beforehand.

Quicker path to settlement if requirements are met.

If you get married to a non-EEA national after moving to Germany, spouses can join right away without the usual two-year waiting period.

Other EU countries count years spent under BlueCard towards settlement if you have a subsequent BlueCard in that country.

Disadvantages: In the first two years you need permission from the authorities to change employer, you can't get a BlueCard from another EU country if you have spent less than 18 months on BlueCard in Germany.

Whether you qualify mostly depends on your salary level. Have a read here:

BAMF - Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge - EU Blue Card
 

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I suspect this hinges on the definition of "post-doc".

If the university is just hiring you to work in a lab or something and considers you an employee, you'll need permission to work. Either a Blue Card (if your salary is high enough) or a regular work visa will do. It's a job like any other. (The fact that they said they need to see "erwerbstätigkeit gestattet" suggests to me that this is the case.)

Alternatively, if it really is a post-doc the way I understand post-docs to be, you'd be receiving a stipend not a salary (so no need to worry about taxes) and you'd just apply for the scientific/research visa. But you're not allowed to "work" in the sense of having a regular paid job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see thank you both so very much for the replays.

Considering that they were very clear that they only thing they cared about is that I am allowed to work, I would assume that it is a regular "job", i.e. that I have to pay taxes (which will be done automatically I assume).

As such, the scientific visa is out I guess.

Since my job offer is for 2 years, and I have no intention of quitting earlier (its a great Uni), I guess that the blue card has no real disadvantages for me. I will ask the representative to whom I will submit my application to, if I qualify for the blue card. If I not, I am just as happy for the "regular" work-permit.

I guess the application documents required for both these are the same right? (From what I saw, I have to fill out the same questionnaire).

Cheers.
 

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Hello, Hamster127,

may I ask, if you finally got the Blue Card in Germany for your postdoc position?

I'm about to apply for it more or less the same situation,
but there is a strange document needed to be filled in, namely, ZAV formular.
As far as I understand this is an application for the job market, and it is said in it, that if the employer finds a "better" candidacy (which also means just a EU-citizen with the same skills),
then it has to let the job to that person.
My employer is not sure whether admitting such a document can guarantee me a job,
but this is mainly because they have never dealt with this Blue-Card business.

Any comment would be appreciated.

Cheers.
 
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