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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to return to Spain, where I used to live, to see friends, but am absolutely baffled by the extremely poor information available regarding quarantine requirements. If I am contacted because a passenger on the plane over there tested positive, will I have to be tested or quarantine, or will the fact I'm vaccinated override any such requirement? I'm triple vaccinated (two AstraZeneca and a Pfizer booster a week ago).

I'm not prepared to take the risk of quarantine so if this is the case, I'll cancel my trip, but I can't for the life of me find the information! I'd really appreciate any advice.
 

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I'd like to return to Spain, where I used to live, to see friends, but am absolutely baffled by the extremely poor information available regarding quarantine requirements. If I am contacted because a passenger on the plane over there tested positive, will I have to be tested or quarantine, or will the fact I'm vaccinated override any such requirement? I'm triple vaccinated (two AstraZeneca and a Pfizer booster a week ago).

I'm not prepared to take the risk of quarantine so if this is the case, I'll cancel my trip, but I can't for the life of me find the information! I'd really appreciate any advice.


Obviously unless you are contacted you will never know if you have been exposed or not.
And as there is no requirement for tests to be carried out at either end, most people may choose not to inform or even to take a test (oh its only a cold I wont bother) My pint is getting warm etc.... :)

And why should anyone be exempt from testing just because they have had he jab, its still catchable and easy to spread.
Which if we are being picky this is the one reason I think that cases are still around and it hasn't bottomed out yet.

My son has had covid twice and each time has not shown ANY symptoms, they have regular tests at work and both times he tested positive he isolated. One of these times was from before he was jabbed.

This from the local, which may or not answer your question.

On June 23rd, Spain’s Health Ministry revised its Covid-19 prevention strategy to allow those who have been fully vaccinated to not have to quarantine for ten days if they come into contact with a positive case.
“People who are fully vaccinated and considered a close contact of a positive Covid-19 case will generally speaking be exempt from quarantine,” Spain’s Health Ministry and the country’s Public Health Commission said at the time.
A “close contact” refers to a person who has been fewer than two metres from someone who tested positive for Covid-19, for longer than 15 minutes in a day.
Even though they will not have to quarantine for ten days as was the case previously, they will have to take two Covid tests (PCR or antigen), the first as soon as they’ve found out about the positive case and another seven days after the exposure.
And if it comes back positive, they will have to self-isolate.
Spain has recently allowed self-test kits to be sold at pharmacies without prescriptions, so this can reduce costs even though they’re considered less effective in asymptomatic people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info! I understand testing as a precaution if you've been exposed or have symptoms, I'm just afraid of having an automatic quarantine because of a positive case on the plane, even though chances of catching it there (especially when vaccinated and wearing an FFP2 mask) are absolutely tiny. The UK is making people who were vaccinated outside the UK do a ten-day quarantine if there's a positive case on the plane and apparently it's pretty common for people to be notified about this and to have to do the quarantine, which is where this fear is coming from. The thought of being stuck in a hotel room for ten days because someone else tested positive is horrendous.

If the only thing that can happen is that I need to do a lateral flow test, I'm happy with that. There's no requirement for it to be supervised, right, or to use a certain brand, or report it via an app or something? I could bring some with me in my hand luggage.
 

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You might wear your FFP2 mask on the plane from take-off to landing, but remember the mask doesn't give you as the wearer much protection. For your own protection you are counting on those around you to wear theirs all the time, which they won't.

I'm not sure how much the pharmacy tests are in the UK, but over here thery are 6.50€ so hardly prohibitive cost-wise so I'm not sure if it would be worth bringing some with you.
 

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Thanks for the info! I understand testing as a precaution if you've been exposed or have symptoms, I'm just afraid of having an automatic quarantine because of a positive case on the plane, even though chances of catching it there (especially when vaccinated and wearing an FFP2 mask) are absolutely tiny. The UK is making people who were vaccinated outside the UK do a ten-day quarantine if there's a positive case on the plane and apparently it's pretty common for people to be notified about this and to have to do the quarantine, which is where this fear is coming from. The thought of being stuck in a hotel room for ten days because someone else tested positive is horrendous.

If the only thing that can happen is that I need to do a lateral flow test, I'm happy with that. There's no requirement for it to be supervised, right, or to use a certain brand, or report it via an app or something? I could bring some with me in my hand luggage.
If you had a positive test you would be expected to report it, & you would be told to quarantine - you could do so wherever you were staying, as long as you stayed away from the rest of the household.

You wouldn't have to go to a hotel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You might wear your FFP2 mask on the plane from take-off to landing, but remember the mask doesn't give you as the wearer much protection. For your own protection you are counting on those around you to wear theirs all the time, which they won't.

I'm not sure how much the pharmacy tests are in the UK, but over here thery are 6.50€ so hardly prohibitive cost-wise so I'm not sure if it would be worth bringing some with you.
I thought they did, and that was the point? Doctor friends of mine have told me the FFP2s provide a very high level of protection for the wearer. Obviously not perfect, but much better than the flimsy surgical masks or the homemade fabric ones.

Lateral flow tests are free in the UK, so I think it is probably worth bringing a couple. I usually would anyway to be honest. I just wasn't sure if the requirement to test was under supervision or if you could just do any old test and only report the result if positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you had a positive test you would be expected to report it, & you would be told to quarantine - you could do so wherever you were staying, as long as you stayed away from the rest of the household.

You wouldn't have to go to a hotel.
I'm staying in a hotel anyway, as friends can't really host me. Fine for a few days while sightseeing and going out and about but the thought of ten days in one isn't great!
 

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Covid is here for the foreseeable future, as a result, restrictions are likely to remain for the foreseeable (perhaps next two years, perhaps they will never go away!). Each person needs to evaluate the risk one is willing to take for getting life back to normal. My wife and I faced this decision last December (before vaccinations) whether we were going to travel to the United States for our younger son´s wedding. We decided that we were going to get our lives back to normal and minimize risks. My wife, a former nurse, developed the procedures we were going to use:
  • FFP2 mask,
  • Plastic face shield
  • Disinfectant wipes for seat belts, trays, etc.
  • Plenty of hand gel
  • Surgical gloves when entering a public bathroom.
Over the last year, I have made 10 trans-Atlantic flights using these procedures. I have never had any problems. Each person needs to make their own decision; however, we have decided we are going to accept Covid as an on-going problem but get on with life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Covid is here for the foreseeable future, as a result, restrictions are likely to remain for the foreseeable (perhaps next two years, perhaps they will never go away!). Each person needs to evaluate the risk one is willing to take for getting life back to normal. My wife and I faced this decision last December (before vaccinations) whether we were going to travel to the United States for our younger son´s wedding. We decided that we were going to get our lives back to normal and minimize risks. My wife, a former nurse, developed the procedures we were going to use:
  • FFP2 mask,
  • Plastic face shield
  • Disinfectant wipes for seat belts, trays, etc.
  • Plenty of hand gel
  • Surgical gloves when entering a public bathroom.
Over the last year, I have made 10 trans-Atlantic flights using these procedures. I have never had any problems. Each person needs to make their own decision; however, we have decided we are going to accept Covid as an on-going problem but get on with life.
I've been to several weddings in the last couple of months, two of them requiring plane travel, because my family is split up in different countries. I have been extremely cautious throughout the pandemic and barely left my house for the first 18 months of it, but I think we're definitely at the point now where it has to be a case of getting on with things (while being as cautious as possible).

I think it's sensible to continue with restrictions, but in some cases they're simply not logical. For example, a Spanish person who was vaccinated in Spain and travels to the UK will have to quarantine for ten days if there was a positive case on the plane, but a British-vaccinated person won't. Being wary of planes made sense way back at the beginning of the pandemic, but I don't think it does now. Masks aren't even mandatory in the UK, so there's a far higher chance of someone getting infected in a restaurant, on a train or in a shop than in a plane with recycled air and most of the passengers in masks. An automatic quarantine based on exposure feels like something that made sense at the beginning of the pandemic but doesn't make sense at this point for people who are fully vaccinated and with the virus practically endemic all over Europe now.
 

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I've been to several weddings in the last couple of months, two of them requiring plane travel, because my family is split up in different countries. I have been extremely cautious throughout the pandemic and barely left my house for the first 18 months of it, but I think we're definitely at the point now where it has to be a case of getting on with things (while being as cautious as possible).

I think it's sensible to continue with restrictions, but in some cases they're simply not logical. For example, a Spanish person who was vaccinated in Spain and travels to the UK will have to quarantine for ten days if there was a positive case on the plane, but a British-vaccinated person won't. Being wary of planes made sense way back at the beginning of the pandemic, but I don't think it does now. Masks aren't even mandatory in the UK, so there's a far higher chance of someone getting infected in a restaurant, on a train or in a shop than in a plane with recycled air and most of the passengers in masks. An automatic quarantine based on exposure feels like something that made sense at the beginning of the pandemic but doesn't make sense at this point for people who are fully vaccinated and with the virus practically endemic all over Europe now.
But that's the UK. And I agree that it's a crazy state of affairs.

We don't have automatic quarantine due to exposure here on Spain - only if you test positive.

If you are traced as having been exposed, you are tested & only if your test is positive do you have to quarantine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
But that's the UK. And I agree that it's a crazy state of affairs.

We don't have automatic quarantine due to exposure here on Spain - only if you test positive.

If you are traced as having been exposed, you are tested & only if your test is positive do you have to quarantine.
Ah yes, I know - I was just checking to make absolute sure it isn't the case, as I couldn't find any solid information confirming it. When you say 'you are tested' if you're traced as being exposed, do you mean I would need to go to a place to be tested with someone performing the swab test, or could I just do my own lateral flow and let them know if it's positive, as other posters have said?
 

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Ah yes, I know - I was just checking to make absolute sure it isn't the case, as I couldn't find any solid information confirming it. When you say 'you are tested' if you're traced as being exposed, do you mean I would need to go to a place to be tested with someone performing the swab test, or could I just do my own lateral flow and let them know if it's positive, as other posters have said?
You would be given an appointment at the nearest testing centre & tested there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You would be given an appointment at the nearest testing centre & tested there.
Is this documented anywhere? This is quite a step up from 'just do a lateral flow test at home' and would heavily impact the plans I've made with my friends and possibly mean I'd have to change my flight while waiting for results (if it's a PCR and not a lateral flow) because I'm there for such a short time. Someone else referenced needing to do another test x days later - does that mean this would also need to be done in Spain at a clinic? If so, that's not a whole lot better than quarantining, and I'd rather just not go.

I'm pretty shocked this information isn't readily available, to be honest.
 

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Is this documented anywhere? This is quite a step up from 'just do a lateral flow test at home' and would heavily impact the plans I've made with my friends and possibly mean I'd have to change my flight while waiting for results (if it's a PCR and not a lateral flow) because I'm there for such a short time. Someone else referenced needing to do another test x days later - does that mean this would also need to be done in Spain at a clinic? If so, that's not a whole lot better than quarantining, and I'd rather just not go.

I'm pretty shocked this information isn't readily available, to be honest.
I don't know if it's documented anywhere.

It's simply what happens.

If you are contacted by the Spanish tracing system, you are given an appointment for a test.

It happened to a family member of mine & I know others who it has happened to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't know if it's documented anywhere.

It's simply what happens.

If you are contacted by the Spanish tracing system, you are given an appointment for a test.

It happened to a family member of mine & I know others who it has happened to.
I would expect this to be documented so anyone heading to Spain knows what they might expect. The process for what to do if you're contacted about a positive case exposure is clearly documented for all the other countries I've been to this year, and not one of them required a test at a testing centre. What happens if the appointment date if after your flight? Or are they usually immediate? Is it a PCR test? Does this mean needing to stay in the country until you get the result back?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I just think people need to understand what they're signing up for so they can make an informed decision on whether to go to Spain or not. I of course have no problem isolating in Spain if I actually get covid, but I'm not prepared to end up scrambling to book extra nights and change my flights because of the tiniest chance I might. As silly as the UK rules are, at least they're clear and readily available! Not having the information I need to make the decision doesn't sit well with me.
 

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I just think people need to understand what they're signing up for so they can make an informed decision on whether to go to Spain or not. I of course have no problem isolating in Spain if I actually get covid, but I'm not prepared to end up scrambling to book extra nights and change my flights because of the tiniest chance I might. As silly as the UK rules are, at least they're clear and readily available! Not having the information I need to make the decision doesn't sit well with me.
Again - you would only have to quarantine if you had a positive test. In other words if you had covid - just like anywhere in the world!

In Spain there's no quarantine if you might have it. Only if you do!

VERY different to the UK where anyone not vaccinated in the UK but fully vaccinated elsewhere - with exactly the same vaccine - , does have to quarantine only if they might have it, & even if they have had negative tests, just because someone on the plane had a positive test!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Again - you would only have to quarantine if you had a positive test. In other words if you had covid - just like anywhere in the world!

In Spain there's no quarantine if you might have it. Only if you do!

VERY different to the UK where anyone not vaccinated in the UK but fully vaccinated elsewhere - with exactly the same vaccine - , does have to quarantine only if they might have it, & even if they have had negative tests, just because someone on the plane had a positive test!
You're not getting what I'm asking.

I'm not talking about quarantine, I'm asking whether contact with a positive case would mean being forced to stay in Spain for an extra ten days to undergo required testing. I'm assuming I can't take a PCR test and then get on a flight home while waiting for the results, right? And if that first PCR is negative, do I still need to stay in Spain to take another one a week later, or am I fine to fly home and do it in the UK? Obviously having to be quarantined in Spain is different to being free to go out and about, but I don't want to spend an extra 10+ days in Spain, with all the extra costs that entails, based on a tiny chance of transmission. Maybe I'm overthinking and they'd let me just fly home, but why on earth isn't it documented clearly? How can people make informed decisions without pertinent information?

I'm just baffled by the fact there's no information about this PCR test requirement and any possible requirement to stay much longer than planned in Spain while undergoing further tests. I'm looking into it because I'm conscientious but I know loads of people who have just been for a few days away and had absolutely no idea that this could have been required. Surely the onus is on Spain to make it crystal clear to people what the process for exposure is? I agree the UK process is silly, but at least people know exactly what they're signing up for! I don't!
 
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