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Hi Folks.:)

We are currently living in Dumaguete City, and have heard that Puerto Princesa is a great place to live, listed as the Philippines Cleanest and less dense City by Population per area.

Anyone here live there and would like to comment ?

Or have lived there, or knows any expats living there?

All feed back will be appreciated.

Thanks.

Paul and Angie.:cool:
 

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considering Palawan

hi Paul and Angie......

I don't live in the Philippines yet, but am considering retiring there within the next few years. I'm married to a Filipina (12 years now and still happy!!) and have been to the Philippines about 15 times, and have explored many islands in the process. I've also done a lot of research over the years, and am in the process of doing much more detailed research on everything from where to live, visas and farming to banking, health care and cultural norms.

In regards to your question about Palawan, I can only tell you my experiences there (having visited and I used to own some beach property near El Nido), and the results of my research so far. My wife's family lives in Leyte (and thank God were just outside of the main path of Yolanda so as to be relatively safe and little damage), and so I've heavily researched a few main islands like Leyte, Bohol, Cebu, ****** and Palawan in particular. My tastes and reasoning may not be your own, but here goes.....

I was seriously thinking Bohol because it's still relatively "undiscovered", has many fine beaches/waterfalls/chocolate hills/farmland/interesting natural sites, has a decent sized city in Tagbiliran, an airport, land is still relatively fairly priced compared to say Cebu, easy transport to Cebu and other islands, and so on. But, then came the recent earthquake and my research showed some history of that. Then, we considered Leyte due to her parents proximity, and though it didn't have as much of the natural wonders, it did have cheaper land, an international airport and other amenities. Then came the Typhoon, and my research showed a history of such there. I very much enjoy Cebu and understand some of the advantages of the island with better hospitals, bigger airport, bigger city and ease of acquiring certain goods, and so on. But, land/housing is expensive, I don't like large cities in the Philippines (or anywhere for that matter), don't like the pollution, and I envision Cebu 10-20 years from now as a small Manila. NO THANK YOU! I did look at ******, and think that Bacalod has promise with a not too large city with amenities, but a good business climate and some progressive ecological mindsets. But, my mind and research has continually pushed me to Palawan.

Why Palawan? Again, it may not be for everyone, but here goes. Almost no history of earthquakes (outside the main tectonic plates), not much history of typhoons except in the very northern part and offshore islands, no volcanoes, it is recognized worldwide as one of the most desirable islands in the world for reasons from being ecologically protected by the national government to a plethora of white sand beaches, it has Puerto Princesa with an international airport/decent expat community/decent hospitals/new Robinsons mall/recognized as a green city, and so on. Though nice white beach property is rapidly getting out priced, farmland there, rent and housing in general is cheap. The island has all sorts of waterfalls, the underground river (one of the 7 wonders of the world), El Nido (if you haven't been there it's a must visit), gorgeous mountains and limestone geology, indigenous tribes, and more than one can describe here.

Some would say it's too remote, but I would say it's only an hour flight from Manila or Cebu, and if you live anywhere near Puerto Princesa, then you have decent facilities nearby. Certainly, some areas of the island are very difficult to reach and they are just now improving the main roadways, but this is part of what I actually like about the island. I love farmland, the mountains, and isolated beaches. I love the quieter pace. I love the idea that it is not yet fully developed and has so much potential, for business, for investment, for contributing to the community, for discovery and adventure, etc.

So, at this point, it appears we may end up in Palawan one day, where we are planning to buy farmland, help her family move, create a self sufficient family farm, give back to the local community, and create our retirement heaven. I would love to hear from you and what your thinking and research is telling you, and would love to hear from any expats or Filipinos who might help me/us make a decision like this on where to live, what to plan for, pros and cons, etc. Don't bother with the posts about corruption, slow government processes, families thinking Americans are all rich, blackouts, or the bi**h sessions.....I've been around the Philippines enough to know all that and what to expect....and I still love it there and wish to move there one day. I could complain about many of the same things here in the states....it's all relative. For me, in my retirement, I don't seek to play golf all day and relax in luxury here in the states....I want to go to the Philippines and do something more purposeful with my life and give back to my wife's family, the community and those who are less fortunate. I've already lived a wonderful life. And, I'm probably a simpler man than most.....not materialistic, don't need the big house and car, and don't need the city. Put me on the farm with enough privacy and God's beauty around me Please!!
 

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Making The Move

hi Paul and Angie......

I don't live in the Philippines yet, but am considering retiring there within the next few years. I'm married to a Filipina (12 years now and still happy!!) and have been to the Philippines about 15 times, and have explored many islands in the process. I've also done a lot of research over the years, and am in the process of doing much more detailed research on everything from where to live, visas and farming to banking, health care and cultural norms.

In regards to your question about Palawan, I can only tell you my experiences there (having visited and I used to own some beach property near El Nido), and the results of my research so far. My wife's family lives in Leyte (and thank God were just outside of the main path of Yolanda so as to be relatively safe and little damage), and so I've heavily researched a few main islands like Leyte, Bohol, Cebu, ****** and Palawan in particular. My tastes and reasoning may not be your own, but here goes.....

I was seriously thinking Bohol because it's still relatively "undiscovered", has many fine beaches/waterfalls/chocolate hills/farmland/interesting natural sites, has a decent sized city in Tagbiliran, an airport, land is still relatively fairly priced compared to say Cebu, easy transport to Cebu and other islands, and so on. But, then came the recent earthquake and my research showed some history of that. Then, we considered Leyte due to her parents proximity, and though it didn't have as much of the natural wonders, it did have cheaper land, an international airport and other amenities. Then came the Typhoon, and my research showed a history of such there. I very much enjoy Cebu and understand some of the advantages of the island with better hospitals, bigger airport, bigger city and ease of acquiring certain goods, and so on. But, land/housing is expensive, I don't like large cities in the Philippines (or anywhere for that matter), don't like the pollution, and I envision Cebu 10-20 years from now as a small Manila. NO THANK YOU! I did look at ******, and think that Bacalod has promise with a not too large city with amenities, but a good business climate and some progressive ecological mindsets. But, my mind and research has continually pushed me to Palawan.

Why Palawan? Again, it may not be for everyone, but here goes. Almost no history of earthquakes (outside the main tectonic plates), not much history of typhoons except in the very northern part and offshore islands, no volcanoes, it is recognized worldwide as one of the most desirable islands in the world for reasons from being ecologically protected by the national government to a plethora of white sand beaches, it has Puerto Princesa with an international airport/decent expat community/decent hospitals/new Robinsons mall/recognized as a green city, and so on. Though nice white beach property is rapidly getting out priced, farmland there, rent and housing in general is cheap. The island has all sorts of waterfalls, the underground river (one of the 7 wonders of the world), El Nido (if you haven't been there it's a must visit), gorgeous mountains and limestone geology, indigenous tribes, and more than one can describe here.

Some would say it's too remote, but I would say it's only an hour flight from Manila or Cebu, and if you live anywhere near Puerto Princesa, then you have decent facilities nearby. Certainly, some areas of the island are very difficult to reach and they are just now improving the main roadways, but this is part of what I actually like about the island. I love farmland, the mountains, and isolated beaches. I love the quieter pace. I love the idea that it is not yet fully developed and has so much potential, for business, for investment, for contributing to the community, for discovery and adventure, etc.

So, at this point, it appears we may end up in Palawan one day, where we are planning to buy farmland, help her family move, create a self sufficient family farm, give back to the local community, and create our retirement heaven. I would love to hear from you and what your thinking and research is telling you, and would love to hear from any expats or Filipinos who might help me/us make a decision like this on where to live, what to plan for, pros and cons, etc. Don't bother with the posts about corruption, slow government processes, families thinking Americans are all rich, blackouts, or the bi**h sessions.....I've been around the Philippines enough to know all that and what to expect....and I still love it there and wish to move there one day. I could complain about many of the same things here in the states....it's all relative. For me, in my retirement, I don't seek to play golf all day and relax in luxury here in the states....I want to go to the Philippines and do something more purposeful with my life and give back to my wife's family, the community and those who are less fortunate. I've already lived a wonderful life. And, I'm probably a simpler man than most.....not materialistic, don't need the big house and car, and don't need the city. Put me on the farm with enough privacy and God's beauty around me Please!!
The areas that you have in mind have real potential for good places to live. However, after Yolanda you would need to spend time in both places to locate a safe and livable area.

I've been married and living here in the islands for over 10 years now.

As you said in a post, there is good and bad everywhere. As great as it is to have family here, the opposite is usually true if you live too close to them. Too close and can easily end up hounded by this "wonderful" family with every conceivable excuse for a need of your financial help. Even if your wife is as determined as you would likely be in controlling these events, it never stops----it just never stops. Also, depending on this family and it's individual members AND how sober the person is at the time; a denial by either of you for help can cost you your life. Good judgment and common sense is mostly non existent here and can cause real safety issues!
For these reasons as well as others it is best to live at least a few hours if not a days travel time from them.

You spoke of wanting to live where there is good hospitals and medical care. While the outlying areas do have private hospitals usually; the quality and even safety in these places {and the doctors} is often fluid and questionable at best.

Many years ago I lived on a very small island here that made the Flintstones look modern! As with everyone though, we all eventually reach an age where health is in decline and can cause serious events and concerns even at home in the States. That said, it is extremely important to drop anchor where advanced life support and critical care hospitals are located---and verified as such.

When here and searching for that perfect place, be sure to visit THE FILIPINO DOCTOR on Facebook. (Their regular website is down at the moment). There you will find a good listing of Doctors, Hospitals, as well as clinics. Really pays to visit them in person and even interview a few doctors at the same time.
Another medical issue is that doctors here will not request your records from home as doctors always do there. That makes it imperative to bring a complete medical history as well as X-rays with you for both you and your wife.
Most all medicines are available here and over the counter without an Rx.

Hope you enjoy the hunt for the best place.



Regards

Jet...
 

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@Pogi.... Jet Lag has something there, I live semi-remote and it works for me but I'm on Luzon, if you can manage to live completely off the grid it would work somewhat well but the typhoon in Leyete brought out some serious panic and roving bands of thugs, criminals and insurgents, many people were cowering and in fear for there lives, thousands decided to move back to major cities.

I live in and around Pagsanjuan Falls, Laguna and there are several area's a person can live very well, possibly start a business the huge lake provides fresh water, I had a deep well put in along with my own water system, I have no worries about running out of water ever.... the electricity goes off, well I have a hand pump.

I live minutes away from large malls and grocery stores, restaurants but live a couple of hours from Manila, everything seems to be in Manila, remote area's have very little selection, some don't have internet and cable the general TV stations broadcast in Tagalog that can get old after a while and drive you nutz.
 

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@Pogi.... Jet Lag has something there, I live semi-remote and it works for me but I'm on Luzon, if you can manage to live completely off the grid it would work somewhat well but the typhoon in Leyete brought out some serious panic and roving bands of thugs, criminals and insurgents, many people were cowering and in fear for there lives, thousands decided to move back to major cities.

I live in and around Pagsanjuan Falls, Laguna and there are several area's a person can live very well, possibly start a business the huge lake provides fresh water, I had a deep well put in along with my own water system, I have no worries about running out of water ever.... the electricity goes off, well I have a hand pump.

I live minutes away from large malls and grocery stores, restaurants but live a couple of hours from Manila, everything seems to be in Manila, remote area's have very little selection, some don't have internet and cable the general TV stations broadcast in Tagalog that can get old after a while and drive you nutz.
Hmmm-you're much more generous with opinions of the local TV than I would be. Soon as I enter a room with the local stuff on the tube I make a quick exit or change the channel.
Have you ever tried any bait fishing in that lake? Looks like a prime spot to me for maybe some bass and or catfish..
 
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family, money and health care

QUOTE=Jet Lag;2497497]The areas that you have in mind have real potential for good places to live. However, after Yolanda you would need to spend time in both places to locate a safe and livable area.
yes, this is why I'm now looking at Palawan, rather than Leyte, Bohol, or especially Luzon, where most Typhoons seem to end up.....

As you said in a post, there is good and bad everywhere. As great as it is to have family here, the opposite is usually true if you live too close to them. Too close and can easily end up hounded by this "wonderful" family with every conceivable excuse for a need of your financial help. Even if your wife is as determined as you would likely be in controlling these events, it never stops----it just never stops. Also, depending on this family and it's individual members AND how sober the person is at the time; a denial by either of you for help can cost you your life. Good judgment and common sense is mostly non existent here and can cause real safety issues!
For these reasons as well as others it is best to live at least a few hours if not a days travel time from them.
Wow.....sorry, some of that seems pretty cynical, especially the part about costing your life. I have zero fear of that with my wife's family.....they are good, humble people. Misguided, making some bad choices and in need, but good people. I do understand the requests for money.....all too well. I don't want to share how much I've already sent over to the Philippines trying to help family start businesses, repair homes, etc. Incredible. But, it wasn't a problem due to any deceit or dishonesty, and only one relative makes any "demands", and we will live far from him. They're just uneducated and don't understand business, budgets, etc. And all of that is a major part of the reason I wish to move there and teach them. You can't teach that type of stuff from 10,000 miles away. I will have sufficient funds to keep a small business for continuing income in the US, as well as plenty of savings, and enough to fully finance a large farm in the Philippines. Not a commercial farm mind you, but a large family farm of perhaps 20-50 hectacres including buildings homes, outbuildings, barns, farm equipment, establishing ponds, and so on. I also don't plan on giving money, but requiring the family to work in exchange for any money given. I already support 18 of my wife's Siblings (6 of them all around 15-35 years old), 2 parents, and 8 kids in the family home in Leyte by sending money all the time. But that way, they will always be dependent and that's not healthy for me or them. The elder siblings and parents will be asked if they prefer to live on the family farm and contribute/exchange work for pay on the farm.....or, they can stay in Leyte on their own. Those that choose to come live on the farm will work for their living and there will be "community rules" for all to live by. The farm will eventually not only provide food for all of us, but produce enough to sell, and we will establish other small local business investments on the farm in order to have the farm eventually completely self sufficient and not dependent on my financing. They will understand that I'm retiring there and once I die, they are on their own.....learn to run the family farm or go back to poverty.

You spoke of wanting to live where there is good hospitals and medical care. While the outlying areas do have private hospitals usually; the quality and even safety in these places {and the doctors} is often fluid and questionable at best.

we all eventually reach an age where health is in decline and can cause serious events and concerns even at home in the States. That said, it is extremely important to drop anchor where advanced life support and critical care hospitals are located---and verified as such.
I don't plan on living too far outside of Puerto Princesa.....perhaps 30 to 45 minutes. I believe PP has decent hospitals.....it's a town of about 250,000 people and from what I've heard the medical care is pretty good. Anything too major and I'm then an hour out of Cebu or Manilla. Someone else mentioned living 2 hours outside of Manilla.....well, I'll be within 40 minutes of a hospital in PP, or once there an hour out of Manilla should there be the need. Anything slow progressing and major, I'd return to the US. It's all a risk. Even living in the US one could catch something in the hospital and die, or be 40 minutes from the hospital due to traffic and distance and not make it.

When here and searching for that perfect place, be sure to visit THE FILIPINO DOCTOR on Facebook. (Their regular website is down at the moment). There you will find a good listing of Doctors, Hospitals, as well as clinics. Really pays to visit them in person and even interview a few doctors at the same time.
Another medical issue is that doctors here will not request your records from home as doctors always do there. That makes it imperative to bring a complete medical history as well as X-rays with you for both you and your wife.
Most all medicines are available here and over the counter without an Rx.
I have found the FILIPINO DOCTOR online in my research. Great site, and thanks for mentioning it for all reading. I also think it's great advice to bring all medical records from the US. thanks for sharing.....Pogi
 

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@ Pogi... I sent money for about 10 years plus so the family could take care of our adopted kids and not surprisingly nobody bothered to start a business with the money and when I showed up here our kids were hiding under the kitchen table during meals, their legs covered in mosquito bites and cheap clothes the other family kids were dressed in real nice clothes, found a booklet of how they shared the money just like welfare.

After dealing with this for years and trying to change this we gave up so the money started drying up and my wife began to live with our kids in the Philippines so they got nothing....OOooh boy get ready when the money stops and it really needs to stop.

When I arrived here I had all sorts of business plans but nobody will work for very long, and the main reason is they all want to be boss or own their own business and then have other family members, cousins work for them.

I feel if after 10 years the family couldn't figure out how to make money or start business after sending support for so many years... then it would be a huge tasking to teach them something their not familiar with or won't do, it's a mindset that can't be changed and they don't want change just money, my personal and agonizing experience. I had to get my spouse on board with the changes (Main problem) and it took some time but thank God she came around or I would have left.
 

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Mcalleyboy.....I hear you. I've been married about 13 yrs now, and for the first couple of years, I just sent money. Then, I thought that it was very dysfunctional and I should help them start businesses in order for them to become self sufficient and not dependent on me. All went well for a few years. I helped them start 2 sari-sari stores, bought a jeepney, bikes, leased the rights to a parcel of land for rice and coconuts, and eventually allowed Pa to talk me into an Air Con van for transport between towns.

That's when it all fell apart. Pa kept taking money out of the till at the main store for repairs to the jeepny or van, licenses, etc. At first I didn't know and kept sending money to stock the store as it's sale were growing, but in reality I was funding the jeepny and van and they weren't saving for repairs, etc. Long story short, I told Pa that was it.....I was not funding the van. My wife woke up and supported it as we began sending less and less money. Of course, everyone freaked and it was tough on my wife. The sari-sari stores eventually closed and they were scared where they would get food. Now, we help them stay fed again and I have refused to start any more businesses or buy any other vehicles.

I'm not mad.....they are uneducated (her parents eloped at 16 years old) and have no clue about saving money, budgets, and the mechanics of business. They are not demanding, are not dishonest, and are not lazy per se. Yes, they don't work as hard as I do or would there, but I can live with that, and at my age, maybe that's a good thing. And of the 6 siblings, some are more or less motivated, but this is true in most any family. They are decent people who would like a chance to live better.

I'm not going there with my eyes covered, they are wide open. I love living on the land, gardening, landscaping, etc and love the idea of living off the land. If they wish to join me, they can, if they wish to live elsewhere and just above the line of poverty, they can. I have no illusions of a utopia, and understand there will always be drama with most any Filipino family....whether I remain here in the US or go there, my wife is affected, and I am watching them from afar now in poverty. It hurts to watch from afar, my wife cries for them, and I wish to try. I would like to share what I can and help who I can, rather than sit around in relative luxury here in the states and play golf in retirement. I can't take it wit me, and I can't live the rest of my life relaxing in retirement without a real purpose driving me. There are charities on every corner here in the states and no reason for homelessness or poverty, and the poor here still have microwaves, big screen TV's, a car and AC. Over there, poverty is real and it doesn't have to be so. They just don't know how to live self sufficiently, raise kids properly, educate properly, be truly sanitary, eat well, and lack medical care. And they live day to day wondering where the next meal is coming from, how to pay for meds the parents now are needing, etc. If I can teach this family, the 6 brothers and sisters, and their kids, and they can then be better parents and spread some knowledge into the next generation, then I will have done something that could affect generations to come, and make those families lives a little better.......simply by caring, teaching and helping them help themselves. That's enough for me, and I'll risk living with some drama.....

thanks for sharing.....Pogi
 

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@Pogi, the gardening and planting soon real cool, I wouldn't let them play you any longer, there are jobs here, we thought that everyone would starve if we didn't send money....that's just not gonna happen here, they all have best friends and compadres, neighbors and they all work together helping each other out with work options, after living here this time for almost 5 years and married to my wife for 25 years, stationed here in the early 80's and meeting my wifes family in the early 90's I have learned that they do and they can make money, they have skills and friends.
 

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@Pogi, the gardening and planting soon real cool, I wouldn't let them play you any longer, there are jobs here, we thought that everyone would starve if we didn't send money....that's just not gonna happen here, they all have best friends and compadres, neighbors and they all work together helping each other out with work options, after living here this time for almost 5 years and married to my wife for 25 years, stationed here in the early 80's and meeting my wifes family in the early 90's I have learned that they do and they can make money, they have skills and friends.
Agree 100%. Sounds cold hearted but in fact is just about the only way to deal with families here. These people managed to do what was needed and stay alive long before we foreigners married into the "clan". Same for the generations before them as well.
I do think that there are those that will insist in providing training, jobs, and food Etc etc etc for a time before learning that lesson that it simply has to be stopped. For example I have seen locals given a beautiful, new, gas lawn mower and a day or two instructions on using it. It then remains in a shed and they continue to use hand snipers on hands and knees. When asked why, the answer we don't like the mower because we have always done it this way. Locals for the most part detest work. But they will spend the entire day cutting the lawn with snippers rather that doing it in 20 minutes with a new mower AND free gasoline :doh:!
There will be an endless line of people that will attempt to teach or train these people a few things. In the end, most often it is the soft hearted foreigner that eventually learns the life lessons.
Well, that's my two cents worth in several posts and will stick to my guns of experience. Ya can't get the locals to use good judgement and common sense when it is non existent in the first place.
Don't get me wrong. This is a great place to retire and live. But to change people or the way things are done for any length of time? Not a chance. This place and the culture or way of doing things will likely not change for the rest of time...
 

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Agree 100%. Sounds cold hearted but in fact is just about the only way to deal with families here. These people managed to do what was needed and stay alive long before we foreigners married into the "clan". Same for the generations before them as well.
Locals for the most part detest work.
There will be an endless line of people that will attempt to teach or train these people a few things. In the end, most often it is the soft hearted foreigner that eventually learns the life lessons.
Well, that's my two cents worth in several posts and will stick to my guns of experience. Ya can't get the locals to use good judgement and common sense when it is non existent in the first place.
Don't get me wrong. This is a great place to retire and live. But to change people or the way things are done for any length of time? Not a chance. This place and the culture or way of doing things will likely not change for the rest of time...[/QUOTE]

well Mcalleyboy.......I'm not here to try and change your mind, as much as you appear to be trying to convince myself and others of your perspective and experience by your reply. I do understand why you and others may come to the "not a chance" conclusion on creating change on behalf of the Filipino people. I will concede that many Filipinos have much to learn and seem stuck in their personal growth or ability to effect positive change in these regards. But, I find it unfair, short sighted and sad that anyone would lump an entire race and nation of people into one class or description without any apparent chance of redemption or hope. In the last 10 years, I've already seen quite a bit of awakening and both personal and world awareness happening among the Philippine people. As indicated earlier, I have been to the Philippines about 15 times and each time spending at least several weeks there with family and traveling many of the islands there. Yes, I've experienced some of what you indicate, but I have also met a number of very sharp, capable, hard working Filipinos(as) along the way. I think some in the Philippines are much like certain elements of our own culture in the US......slow to change, harming their own race by hanging on to certain perspectives or mental habits, blaming others, being lazy, living off of those who are willing to work and produce, and so on. This is not a Philippine trait alone. It's a human trait and can be found around the world. In fact, it can be found in lilly white, Caucasian families in the US at times and tends to "pool" where there is a lack of education, cultural stigmas, peer pressure, poverty, and higher thought. Hell, look at the middle east, where many would give up and say the cultures there will never change, but it's happening albeit slowly. This type of cultural immaturity is, however, exacerbated in the Philippines by poverty, a lack of education, inhibiting cultural beliefs, a lack of personal and world awareness, and then of course the limiting beliefs placed upon them by others doesn't help. I have found that most respond if you educate them, but not only in practical matters such as using tools, household sanitation, or how to run a small business.....it's critical to reach people where their hearts and minds converge.....appealing to their sense of personal liberty, pride, and especially their desire to be more and experience a better life and more of life. Many have been poor so long, it's all they know, and you can't expect a lawn mower or a few sentences to change that. If we shrug our shoulders, nothing happens or we in effect confirm our own limited beliefs. It's work, and many have no desire to do the hard work on behalf of others to effect real change. Some of us just wish to retire in their country and relax, not work, especially if on behalf of others who aren't family or "our compatriats". Some people have no concept of our humanitarian and spiritual unity on this planet, and fail to see that by limiting others around us, we are limiting ourselves and future generations including our own children by accepting the world "the way it is", giving up, and assuming that other person/entire country of individuals are incapable of change and personal growth. That holds all of us back and then we deserve the world we create or accept. I believe in the human spirit and that it evolves just as the physical nature of life, and I prefer to be part of those who seek to improve the world around us, support and educate those who need help to awaken and learn, and don't give up on our collective ability to be better people and live better lives. And, should I choose to live in their country, I won't hold them back or "short sell" them as a culture through my own thoughts, words and actions. I will support and help those I can and know that by doing so, each individual we help evolve positively will influence their children and others around them in however small ways and steps forward.

<snip> Do you have any insight on Palawan and other areas of the Philippines that are less prone to natural calamaties, have amenities that make them nice areas to live? I'd like to see this conversation go back to that. I really have no interest in talking down or knocking the Filipinos as a culture and country. Thanks for sharing, Pogi
 

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While Mcalleyboy may or may not agree with the post you are reffering to, it is important to set the record stright and let you know that the quoted post was mine and not his. As such, I feel the subject has gone as far as possible in debate and will close the thread.

In answer to your question on better places; sense the typhoon has effectively destroyed many of the areas in the central part of the country, I think that Subic Bay, La Union, and even Baguio City are areas worth looking at for places to live. Given the location of the Philippines and that it is located on the "Ring Of Fire," all areas of the country are subject to natural disasters from weather, earthquakes, and or volcanoes from time to time. Guess all one can do pick a place and hope for the best in the long term.
Hope you are able to locate a good area and enjoy retirement.


Jet Lag
 
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