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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've encountered a new (Mexican) bureaucratic wrinkle.

Where in the past, any CFE, telephone, or other similar bill was acceptable by bureaucrats without the actual applicants name on it, I have now twice encountered the need to provide a copy of both the front and back of the actual owner's ID along with their signature below a statement like:
Yo, (bill's actual owner's name) hago constar de (applicant) reside en este domicilio: (address of bill)
all on one sheet of paper!
 

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I've encountered a new (Mexican) bureaucratic wrinkle.

Where in the past, any CFE, telephone, or other similar bill was acceptable by bureaucrats without the actual applicants name on it, I have now twice encountered the need to provide a copy of both the front and back of the actual owner's ID along with their signature below a statement like:
Yo, (bill's actual owner's name) hago constar de (applicant) reside en este domicilio: (address of bill)
all on one sheet of paper!
Must be a local new wrinkle, as many of them are. I haven't found this to be true in Mexico City. Where do you live, dongringo?
 

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Why don't you have the telephone, cable, dish bill in your name? Its not hard to have those in your name as it is to switch over the CFE, water, or gas.

I never use my landlords bills for anything. My names not on them so I don't use it for any sort of proof for anything. If someone wanted to, they could just steal some random persons bill to use and thats not kosher where I come from. Not sure why Mexico says its ok in most cases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Why don't you have the telephone, cable, dish bill in your name? Its not hard to have those in your name as it is to switch over the CFE, water, or gas.

I never use my landlords bills for anything. My names not on them so I don't use it for any sort of proof for anything. If someone wanted to, they could just steal some random persons bill to use and thats not kosher where I come from. Not sure why Mexico says its ok in most cases.
As you probably know it is not that easy to switch anything. In any case everything is in my family's name except the cable company because that was my first bill 10 years agoand they cared less about copies of escrituras, visas and half a dozen other documents.
 

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I have found many times that organisations that require proof address will only acceptf CFE.

The TV, phone bills etc have no chance. If you are lucky and the wind is the correct direction the water bill will be accpeted.
 

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One may go to the 'palacio municipal' to obtain a 'constancia de domicilio'; probably with your landlord's ID information. Then, you won't have to borrow those items more than once.
RVG: Will a copy of the lease on our house be sufficient? It is in English. Since we have an "all inclusive" lease we will not be receiving any utility bills (paid by landlord's agent).

Nice to see the recovery is progressing - good news - regards to Lady RVGRINGO
 

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need to provide a copy of both the front and back of the actual owner's ID along with their signature below a statement like:
Yo, (bill's actual owner's name) hago constar de (applicant) reside en este domicilio:
I had to do this when I bought my car. The agent at the Hacienda wanted a signature. Never before was this asked for and none since.

Will a copy of the lease on our house be sufficient? It is in English
Don't all legal documents such as leases have to be in Spanish? Are they enforceable in English?
 

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For anything government or banking, Ive never had a bill in someone elses name accepted without their signatured OK and copy of their ID. But lately, a few govt offices have accepted my bank statement (with account numbers and balances blacked out). Might be worth asking if all bills are in someone elses name and they arent readily available.
 

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Translated to Spanish by an official translator and it will be useful. An English contract has no validity.
Thanks, I've made the request of our agent. Question: Where/How would I find a certified translator in Ajijic/Chapala in case I need to have it done by myself and not through her?
 

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Thanks, I've made the request of our agent. Question: Where/How would I find a certified translator in Ajijic/Chapala in case I need to have it done by myself and not through her?
My wife and I just renewed our FM3's Chapala and all they wanted was a copy of a utility bill.

As far as rental agreements go I was told by my agent that most of them are in English for Expats but can be translated into Spanish if needed. As far as finding someone to do that my agent has someone and most of the legal people have their own so it should not be hard to find if needed.

Remember that in Mexico a lot of the rules are interpreted by those enforcing them. There really is no consistency as in much of the States.
 

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Your agent or any notario will know. The one we used in the past has moved.
They may be 'officially approved by the state' but you'll seldom get a really good translation; some are even funny. Nevertheless, they get the 'rubber stamp'.
 

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Your agent or any notario will know. The one we used in the past has moved.
They may be 'officially approved by the state' but you'll seldom get a really good translation; some are even funny. Nevertheless, they get the 'rubber stamp'.
To be officially approved as a "perito traductor" by the government, you have to be a Mexican citizen and pass some sort of test. I have no idea what the test is like. It can be quite lucrative work - too bad the practitioners often don't do a careful job. Since I occasionally work as a translator, I know how hard it can be to produce an accurate translation of any kind of document.
 

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To be officially approved as a "perito traductor" by the government, you have to be a Mexican citizen and pass some sort of test. I have no idea what the test is like. It can be quite lucrative work - too bad the practitioners often don't do a careful job. Since I occasionally work as a translator, I know how hard it can be to produce an accurate translation of any kind of document.
My daughter does the same thing, for the bulk of her income, only Italian to English.

When you are trying to translate a motorcycle maintenance manual, originally written in Bulgarian, translated into another language, into your own, and motorcycle maintenance is NOT your area of expertise, it can get challenging, to say the least.

I'm sure you've experienced some of that, Isla Verde.
 

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My daughter does the same thing, for the bulk of her income, only Italian to English.

When you are trying to translate a motorcycle maintenance manual, originally written in Bulgarian, translated into another language, into your own, and motorcycle maintenance is NOT your area of expertise, it can get challenging, to say the least.

I'm sure you've experienced some of that, Isla Verde.
I would never dream of translating a motorcycle maintenance manual, since I know nothing about motorcycles or their care and feeding. I usually stick to my areas of expertise, such as art and museums and general cultural topics. I once translated a scientific study of the trees in Chapultepec Park for a Mexican researcher, but it was not too terribly technical and the author knew English quite well and could help me with tricky words and phrases.
 
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