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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading the threads I get the impression that the poisoning of pets is a common practice in Cyprus, is this accurate and if it is, whats behind it ?
 

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I don't know much about this but this 'lannate' stuff which tends to be the culprit is a kind of insecticide.
 
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I don't know much about this but this 'lannate' stuff which tends to be the culprit is a kind of insecticide.
It seems that another much stronger poison that can be bought in the north is also used. The three dogs recently poisoned in Paphos had got the new ****

Anders
 

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Vindictiveness, insanity, jealousy, ignorance, mindless cruelty.

That's just for starters.
I think that about covers it.

Animal abuse happens everywhere, but my theory is that it is more prevalent here because the law will not step in and prosecute poisoners. There's no deterent.
 
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I think that about covers it.

Animal abuse happens everywhere, but my theory is that it is more prevalent here because the law will not step in and prosecute poisoners. There's no deterent.
There is a lot of pet poisoning in Spain also.

Anders
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm still no closer to understanding the rationale behind such a widespread practice. Is it committed against a particular group of pet owners such as ex pats or are the targets random. A recent report from America says that there are far too many cats and the balance of nature has been upset, this has led to the deaths of billions of wild creatures. I wonder if something of this nature is driving the offenders ?
 

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Sammy, there is no rationale because it is irrational.

I doubt that many Cypriots who poison animals are concerned about the balance of nature.

They think animals are bothering them and that they have the right to eliminate the problem. That's how poisoners view it.

I believe as many (or more?) dogs are poisoned as cats. Often the poison is left in a place where the poisoner cannot possibly know who will eat it and die. Or who the owner is. I don't think that expats are particularly targeted. I've known Cypriots who've had their pets killed.
 

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I'm still no closer to understanding the rationale behind such a widespread practice. Is it committed against a particular group of pet owners such as ex pats or are the targets random. A recent report from America says that there are far too many cats and the balance of nature has been upset, this has led to the deaths of billions of wild creatures. I wonder if something of this nature is driving the offenders ?
Nothing so noble. I've read that report and think it should be required reading for all the misguided cat owners who think their pets are lovable cuddly creatures that wouldn't harm anything.

One Cypriot we met working in his field told warned us about poison locally while we were walking our dog. He said his dog had been poisoned and that it was hunter dog breeders trying to kill hunting dogs belonging to hunters. They would then have to buy another dog.

Other circumstances see killing pets as a revenge or vendetta ploy.

There are also a lot of accidental poisonings as happened to our dog. Poison is laid to protect crops from rat damage. This is why we always walk our dog muzzled to prevent him from eating. Rats do an enormous amount of damage and we lost all our grapes this year to rats.

As unpleasant as this is I do believe those that think Cyprus is particularly bad simply have no knowledge of what happens to animals in many other countries where extraordinary and unnecessary cruelty to animals is a normal part of the food chain. Indeed if there were more prosecutions in Cyprus and the Church were to change it's ridiculous stance on animals there might be hope for improvement. But as the Church here has scant regard for humans let alone animals I hold out little hope.

Pete
 

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Indeed if there were more prosecutions in Cyprus and the Church were to change it's ridiculous stance on animals there might be hope for improvement. But as the Church here has scant regard for humans let alone animals I hold out little hope.

Pete
Blaming the Church for animal poisoning is ridiculous. Saying the Church has scant regard for humans is slanderous.
 

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Blaming the Church for animal poisoning is ridiculous. Saying the Church has scant regard for humans is slanderous.
Both my statements are perfectly justifiable and valid opinions. Nothing I write can ever be slanderous.

The Church here teaches that animals have no soul and therefore can feel no pain. This has been discussed many times on forums and I suggest you quiz your local priest on their attitude.

I consider that the Church has scant regard for humans based on the following article:
Third-party assisted reproduction is adultery, says Church | Cyprus Mail

I would also add that many people have referred to the Church's riches hidden away and lying idle while many in their congregations are starving and rely on charity.

I stand by my opinions and rather than condemn me why not suggest why I am wrong or come to the defence of the Church?

Pete
 

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I've read that report and think it should be required reading for all the misguided cat owners who think their pets are lovable cuddly creatures that wouldn't harm anything.
This specific report, and many like it, fail to take many factors into account, and are pretty heavily hyped up by the media. For a very well considered, educated, and interesting look at cats, and the impact they have on their environment, you should really read "Cat Sense" by Dr. John Bradshaw. As for myself, I think my cats are cute, cuddly, sweet and loving. They are also apex predators, and have sharp edges. I am proud (and show my pride) when one of our little furballs comes home with a kill, as this is what they do naturally. Up until a few years ago, almost all cats were mousers, and prized for their ability to hunt and kill pests. Now all of the sudden we (as a culture) believe that the poor little birdies must be protected, and that cats and their owners are bad for being part of a global slaughter machine. This is (for want of a less cheesy saying) the circle of life, and it will take many, many generations of breeding the more docile types of cats before cats are sufficiently domesticated to suppress the hunting instinct.

Funnily enough, the well meaning but somewhat misguided efforts to neuter all domesticated cats before they reproduce simply means that it is ferals, as opposed to domesticated cats, that keep introducing the "wilder" genes and instincts into the cat population.

Finally, many people don't realise that cats, in many many cases, actually are generally beneficial for wildlife - they keep many other predators, such as rats and magpies etc. at manageable levels. Research has shown that in many cases, for example in the USA and Australia, where some areas have "cat-free" zones, damage to wildlife has increased, rather than decreased.

Ecosystems and foodchains are very complex and intricate machines that we don't have much understanding about. Getting rid of an element that we don't like is like ripping a cog from an engine because we don't like the sound it makes or how it looks. You wil get what you want, but likely your engine will malfunction.

Nature is cruel, and not burdened with the feelings we humans have. Trying to mould nature to our liking is not going to end well, it never has :nono:

Apologies for the semi-rant, I feel rather strongly about this, as a nature and cat lover :)

Martijn :ranger:
 

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No apologies for your rant are needed. I understand and don't disagree with anything you've said. In fact it backs up my original statement somewhat which was not anti-cat but ant cat owners who won't face up to the truth about their animals.

Pete
 

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You cant be an animal lover, and own a cat.

A cat will kill anything it can get its paws on, and torture it first, before killing it.

Cats are probably the most prolific killers of other small animals (in Britain) today.
 
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You cant be an animal lover, and own a cat.

A cat will kill anything it can get its paws on, and torture it first, before killing it.

Cats are probably the most prolific killers of other small animals (in Britain) today.
Sorry but I am both.

But you are right, together with man, cats are the most cruel predators on earth, we both play with our victims before the kill

Anders
 

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You cant be an animal lover, and own a cat.

A cat will kill anything it can get its paws on, and torture it first, before killing it.

Cats are probably the most prolific killers of other small animals (in Britain) today.
All forums have their share of comments that are at variance with other peoples' opinions. But this is the biggest load of codswallop I have read since joining this forum. A little research into the "food chain" may educate the uninformed.
 

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Reading the threads I get the impression that the poisoning of pets is a common practice in Cyprus, is this accurate and if it is, whats behind it ?
There are a few isolated cases of deliberate, targeted poisoning - normally the result of a vendetta, or more likely to silence the odd nuisance howler or barker (in the eyes of the perpetrators). Such cases are avidly picked up by the media. By far the most common cause of poisoning, however, are accidental where pets pick up the widespread poison put down for rats and other target animals considered as pests (including stray dogs). We found numerous packages of poison in our own garden, left there years ago before the house was even built, lodged into trees and wedged under stones. Like shotgun cartridges, the plastic sacks and dispensers of poison will turn up from time to time, when we're pottering in the garden - so vigilance is necessary when caring for pets here, especially if your house is built on land that was once agricultural. One of the key target animals is the carob rat and poison is particularly common around current and past carob plantations, but because the majority of land here is unenclosed, it can turn up pretty much anywhere.
 
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