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Discussion Starter #1
Current situation: Resident in the UK on Tier 1 General due to expire in Feb 2013 (two years visa issued in Feb 2011)
Married to a British citizen and considering whether to apply for Spouse visa or not.

I have two queries if you could help me with as I am all over the place trying to make future plans.

Question 1-
If I change my category and get the spouse visa in April 2012 I am aware that I will be able to apply for ILR in April 2014, what would be the maximum time i can spend outside UK in the two years? (Not for crown service or job related but my wife will be travelling with me)

Question 2-
I am under the impression that I can apply for naturalisation straightaway in April 2014 after getting ILR as I would have spent the qualifying period of 3 years all together prior to my application in the UK. The breakdown is mentioned below:

1 year- April 2011 to April 2012 on Tier 1 General category

2 years- April 2012 to April 2014 on spouse visa.

Therefore my question is, does 1 year in Tier 1 count to add with 2 years spouse visa to make up the qualifying period to make up the 3 years qualifying period for naturalisation application?

Many thanks in advance for your time.
 

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Current situation: Resident in the UK on Tier 1 General due to expire in Feb 2013 (two years visa issued in Feb 2011)
Married to a British citizen and considering whether to apply for Spouse visa or not.

I have two queries if you could help me with as I am all over the place trying to make future plans.

Question 1-
If I change my category and get the spouse visa in April 2012 I am aware that I will be able to apply for ILR in April 2014, what would be the maximum time i can spend outside UK in the two years? (Not for crown service or job related but my wife will be travelling with me)
There isn't any, provided your home is in UK and don't spend more than a year in total abroad.

Question 2-
I am under the impression that I can apply for naturalisation straightaway in April 2014 after getting ILR as I would have spent the qualifying period of 3 years all together prior to my application in the UK. The breakdown is mentioned below:

1 year- April 2011 to April 2012 on Tier 1 General category

2 years- April 2012 to April 2014 on spouse visa.

Therefore my question is, does 1 year in Tier 1 count to add with 2 years spouse visa to make up the qualifying period to make up the 3 years qualifying period for naturalisation application?
Yes, you can add the two periods together. Your absences abroad during the three years will be taken into account. You can be away for a total of 270 days in 3 years, and up to 90 days in the last 12 months prior to applying. So watch your travel pattern and don't exceed those limits.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Very much appreciate your prompt response Joppa. A lot seems clearer now.
I need your opinion on one more thing if that is ok.

I hear all the rumours that spouse visa period is going to change from 2 years to 5 years April 2012 onwards.

How likely is it do you think that it will change before 12th of April?

I understand that you can only speculate but even your expert guess would be a great help.

I have also read in the newspapers in the past few months that the requirements for British citizenship is likely to be made stricter i.e longer residency requirement etc

Say if the residency requirement for Naturalisation do change in the course of 2 years I am likely to wait, do you think I would be exempt as I got married before the change in legislation?

Just trying to reassure myself that my 2 year plan is as fool proof as possible..

I am very tired of not being able to go on those last minute holidays to Europe or to the US whenever I please because of the non EU passport I hope you understand..

Thanks again for your reply.
 
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