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Hi all ,can anyone advise on taking medication perscribed by Irish doctor to Canada.Will we have problems with immigration.I read it is pprohibited on Border Control website.That could not be correct surely.Leaving for Estevan in 2 weeks.Best of luck to you all.:ranger:
 

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Hi all ,can anyone advise on taking medication perscribed by Irish doctor to Canada.Will we have problems with immigration.I read it is pprohibited on Border Control website.That could not be correct surely.Leaving for Estevan in 2 weeks.Best of luck to you all.:ranger:
It depends on the medication.

If it's a medicine for a chronic condition (i.e. Diabetes, Cholesterol, Heart Condition, High Blood Pressure etc) and it is a reasonable amount for personal use (i.e. 90 day supply) and you import it into Canada in its ORIGINAL CONTAINER (i.e. the bottle that it came in when you collected it from the chemist's in Ireland), you shouldn't have any problems with it. The container should have the original dispensing label that the chemist's shop put on at the time of dispensing it to you and the label should (at minimum) have your name, the shop's name, the prescribing GP's name and the name and strength of the drug on it.

DO NOT PUT MORE THAN ONE MEDICINE INTO ONE VIAL (i.e. do not mix your meds).

Would it be possible to get a letter from your GP identifying/verifying that the medications are indeed prescribed to you and necessary? (kind of like how we all had to get travel letters when flying with medicines). That way, if the CBS agent questions you, you have some documentation from Ire explaining the medicines and what they're meant to be used for. This letter would also be a useful introduction to your new Canadian doc as to the name and dosage of the medicines that you are currently on.

I wouldn't recommend trying to bring in more than 100 days supply at most because within that 100 days you should theoretically be able to wait out the 90 day pre-coverage waiting period before going to see a GP here in Canada and get a new prescription. Canadian Border Services (CBS) also realizes that there's generally a 90 day waiting period to be able to get onto the Provincial Medical Plan and go and see a GP in most provinces, so having 100 days supply of a chronic medication wouldn't be an unreasonable amount, because it will at least cover you for the 90 day waiting period and allow you a further 10 days to get in to see a GP here in Canada and get a new prescription. Most provincial health insurance plans only allow a 90-100 day dispense for patients who are already in province, so it is not unreasonable for someone from outside the province to have 90-100 days worth of medicines on hand when they come in.

Suffice to say that if it's a narcotic, you shouldn't bother even considering thinking about bringing them into the country.
 

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Crap.... it won't let me edit more...

I wouldn't recommend trying to bring in more than 100 days supply at most because within that 100 days you should theoretically be able to wait out the 90 day pre-coverage waiting period and still have enough time and medication left to find and see a GP to get a new prescription before you run out. Canadian Border Services (CBS) also realizes that there's generally a 90 day waiting period to be able to get onto the Provincial Medical Plan and go and see a GP in most provinces, so having 100 days supply of a chronic medication wouldn't be an unreasonable amount. Most provincial health insurance plans only allow a 90-100 day dispense for patients who are already in province, so it is not unreasonable for someone from outside the province to have 90-100 days worth of medicines on hand when they come in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Crap.... it won't let me edit more...

I wouldn't recommend trying to bring in more than 100 days supply at most because within that 100 days you should theoretically be able to wait out the 90 day pre-coverage waiting period and still have enough time and medication left to find and see a GP to get a new prescription before you run out. Canadian Border Services (CBS) also realizes that there's generally a 90 day waiting period to be able to get onto the Provincial Medical Plan and go and see a GP in most provinces, so having 100 days supply of a chronic medication wouldn't be an unreasonable amount. Most provincial health insurance plans only allow a 90-100 day dispense for patients who are already in province, so it is not unreasonable for someone from outside the province to have 90-100 days worth of medicines on hand when they come in.
THANKS A MILLION.YOU ARE FULL OF INFORMATION.REAL KIND OF YOU TO REPLY:clap2:
 
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