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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband and I want to move to France this year and need help in determining what benefits we would be eligible for after establishing residency. We would be living on small pension.
Please send any info you may have
Thanks:)
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum.

I've moved your post into the France section in hopes of attracting a few more responses.

Assuming you are covered under the UK health plan, you would effectively transfer your coverage to the French national plan. (You need to get an EHIC - European Health Insurance Card - in order to process the transfer.) The French health coverage is quite a bit different from what you may be used to in the UK - you pay for most doctor visits and services and then you are reimbursed at something less than 100% (depending on your circumstances). Most people have a "mutuelle" (or top-up insurance) to cover the difference.

Past that, most benefits available to pensioners are means-tested to some extent, and generally available through the local mairie (town hall). These can include: meals on wheels (i.e. home delivered meals), some towns provide transport for the elderly to near-by shopping centers once or twice a month, a "third-age" club that offers events, meals and often holiday trips for the elderly at very reasonable cost. It's possible to have your redevance (TV tax) and/or the taxe d'habitation reduced or subsidized (for those on limited incomes).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi and welcome to the forum.

I've moved your post into the France section in hopes of attracting a few more responses.

Assuming you are covered under the UK health plan, you would effectively transfer your coverage to the French national plan. (You need to get an EHIC - European Health Insurance Card - in order to process the transfer.) The French health coverage is quite a bit different from what you may be used to in the UK - you pay for most doctor visits and services and then you are reimbursed at something less than 100% (depending on your circumstances). Most people have a "mutuelle" (or top-up insurance) to cover the difference.

Past that, most benefits available to pensioners are means-tested to some extent, and generally available through the local mairie (town hall). These can include: meals on wheels (i.e. home delivered meals), some towns provide transport for the elderly to near-by shopping centers once or twice a month, a "third-age" club that offers events, meals and often holiday trips for the elderly at very reasonable cost. It's possible to have your redevance (TV tax) and/or the taxe d'habitation reduced or subsidized (for those on limited incomes).
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks for your reply. We have obtained our EHIC and have researched some of the health insurance stuff.
Other questions, We live on a small pension and wonder if there are things such as housing benefits which pay one's rent when on a very small income as we have in the UK????
Also, how long does one have to live in France to establish residency and eligibility for benefits?
Thanks
 

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Hi - are you British or Irish? Are you over 65?

Normally you need to live in France permanently for 5 years to establish residency. So private health care might be needed for 5 years. But if you are British and are over 65 then your health costs and other social security entitlements might be borne by the UK system. You need to phone Newcastle for details.

But you will find that life in France can be expensive, never mind a poor exchange rate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi - are you British or Irish? Are you over 65?

Normally you need to live in France permanently for 5 years to establish residency. So private health care might be needed for 5 years. But if you are British and are over 65 then your health costs and other social security entitlements might be borne by the UK system. You need to phone Newcastle for details.

But you will find that life in France can be expensive, never mind a poor exchange rate.

We are Irish and 63 and 61. We have gotten our medical cards but will do other checking. Thanks for your reply.
 

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We are Irish and 63 and 61. We have gotten our medical cards but will do other checking. Thanks for your reply.
I think the EU rules state that at least one of you must be of Ireland's state retirement age and in receipt of state pension to be able to get free coverage under French health scheme, by getting form E121 from Irish social security authorities. Remember that the French health scheme only reimburses around 70% of costs incurred, so you must bear the rest yourself or take out a 'top-up' plan called a mutuelle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think the EU rules state that at least one of you must be of Ireland's state retirement age and in receipt of state pension to be able to get free coverage under French health scheme, by getting form E121 from Irish social security authorities. Remember that the French health scheme only reimburses around 70% of costs incurred, so you must bear the rest yourself or take out a 'top-up' plan called a mutuelle.
Thank you for your reply.
 

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I think the EU rules state that at least one of you must be of Ireland's state retirement age and in receipt of state pension to be able to get free coverage under French health scheme, by getting form E121 from Irish social security authorities. Remember that the French health scheme only reimburses around 70% of costs incurred, so you must bear the rest yourself or take out a 'top-up' plan called a mutuelle.
Does this EU regulation apply to all European countries? I'm inquiring as my mum is a Belgian citizen who has a very small pension and we were thinking of bringing her over to France and were wondering about what she could expect health wise. The Belgian authorities mentioned the E121 form, so i guess it does apply in Belgium, but not sure what the French authorities' take is on the matter.
 

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Does this EU regulation apply to all European countries? I'm inquiring as my mum is a Belgian citizen who has a very small pension and we were thinking of bringing her over to France and were wondering about what she could expect health wise. The Belgian authorities mentioned the E121 form, so i guess it does apply in Belgium, but not sure what the French authorities' take is on the matter.
The French may not always stick to the letter of the EU rules in some matters, but they're generally pretty straight-shooting with the health care system. As long as your mum is entitled to an EIHC (new name for the E forms) and is drawing her Belgian pension, she should be eligible for coverage in the French system when she moves to France.

But you may also want to check the Ameli website (just Google Ameli to find it). They don't seem to have much information on transfering foreign health care rights, but they do have information (in French) about your rights as the dependent of a family member, and there is information about a dependent parent.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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