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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're embarking on the bureaucratic process of getting ourselves established in France, and I'd appreciate any hints on the order in which to do the following tasks, since they all seem to be rather inter-related. Would this be right?:

1) Applying for my husband's French pension
2) Declaring residency
3) Applying for the Carte Vitale

Since we'll be "inactif", I gather we'll need to prove we have sufficient financial resources when we declare residency. Given that we're both dual US/UK citizens, all our income (investment, pension, royalties) is paid into our US bank, and we just transfer funds over as necessary, what would constitute adequate proof of resources? They seem to require it from a French bank. (We have maintained about a 5-10k euro balance in that account for several years, using it to pay EDF, impot locaux, that sort of thing, but since that's essentially a float, I don't know if it'd count.) The French pension will be paid into our French bank, but my husband is just putting in the paperwork for that in April (he's retiring from his US post in April, hurrah!).

I also gather we'll need to show proof of health insurance. We have, and will maintain for a couple of years as a safety back-up, US health insurance. But I doubt they'd accept that - would they? We'll be applying for the Carte Vitale, and getting a mutuelle.... but should we do those BEFORE declaring residency? Except don't you need to show the declaration of residency to apply for the Carte Vitale?? (Pauses to chase tail, scratch head and sigh!)

Also - it seems that since the 2003 "Loi Sarkozy" a EU citizen no longer needs a carte de sejour, but the feeling seems to be that it's a good idea to have one for ID purposes. Would you agree? And if so, would we apply for the carte de sejour at the same time as we declare residency, or later/as a separate effort?

And is it true that dealing with French bureaucracy has a similar anti-Alzheimer's effect to doing a daily crossword?:)

I should add that the folk in the various offices are always really sweet to us, but I'd rather not look like a total idiot in front of them too often!

Cheers! And sorry for the convolutions.....

NMMove
 

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If you're both UK citizens, you have no need of visas. Hence, no need to "prove" your resources, etc. etc. First problem solved!

Second one, however, is a bit touchier. Unless you or your husband is entitled to a UK pension, you aren't entitled to any coverage from the French system. You will need full blown Expat health coverage. Although it's a legal requirement, it's rare that the issue comes up until and unless you need hospitalization and then you're "found out." But it's a very good idea in any event.

For expat coverage intended to meet the visa requirements, you can check with the US expat group, AARO AARO - Association of Americans Resident Overseas which offers a group coverage for its members designed to meet visa requirements, and said to be very reasonably priced for what you get. Further, there is a readily available brochure on the website that explains what it's all about - so you have something with which to compare private offers through other international insurers.

In France you don't actually "declare" residency if you're moving there to "exercise your EU rights" (which include retiring to France). As UK citizens, you can (and probably should) apply for a carte de séjour - it saves having to carry your UK passport with you everywhere as i.d. proving you are "legal" in France.

See, it's not nearly as complicated as you thought!
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Hi,
You mention your husband's "french pension" ; what is this , is it a state retirement pension? If it is you will qualify for health cover. If it is private , you will ,as has been said , need full private health insurance until you qualify for a UK state pension. Will you be getting a UK state pension? Your US health insurance (if it covers outside the states may be acceptable-why not take the details to the CPAM and ask them?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Clarifications

We're both entitled to a French state pension, and a US state pension (social security). There's a reciprocal social security agreement between the two. (Actually, we're also entitled to a UK pension from the first years of our career, but the UK appears to be playing dumb on that!) We've both had our career dossiers brought up to date in France.

My question about proving resources comes from this extract of Anglo Info's page on residency (at Residency in France for EU and non-EU Citizens - Carte de Sjour French Residence Permit - AngloINFO Paris & Ile de France (France)

"Inactif/Not working (retired, student, other)
"EU-citizens moving to France with no income from employment (such as retired people and students) have the right to live in France, but need to show they have the financial resources to be self-supporting and not depend on the French state.
"This requires: proof of pension for the retired, or proof of sufficient financial resources to support themselves and dependent family members without requiring French social assistance or health insurance. Students must be enrolled in an educational institution or vocational training and have proof from a French bank of sufficient monthly revenue to support themselves and dependent family members."
 

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Even when you apply for a carte de séjour as an EU citizen, you have to show what you are living on - i.e. to determine your category, which for you will be "inactif." They basically want to see that you have something to live on.

It's considerably less stringent a requirement than the consulate asking proof of resources when you apply for a visa.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Hi,
Once you start drawing a french state pension you will be subject to social charges on it and so to health cover just as if you were working. The french pension office should deal with adding any UK entitlement , so you should talk to them about it.
As UK citizens you don't need a visa or a carte de sejour, your UK passport is all that is required. The only time you might be asked for evidence of income is if you try to claim french welfare .
When we arrived 19 years ago from the UK, we had to show proof of income ,and health cover to obtain a carte de sejour, but for EU citizens that has now ceased, in practice , although it can , in theory be applied in certain cases -see above.
 
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