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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi friends,
I am new in Europe and i am basically an Asian citizen. If i understand correctly, there will be a percentage of the gross salary which will be deducted as social contribution, pension, health etc in france. I will be working in france only for a duration of 1- 2 years(i have a CDI working agreement ). So will i get any benefits or opt out of any of the things which is irrelevant for me. I think close to 22% will be deducted from my salary for all the above contributions.

After two years of work i will be going back to my own country, so is there a way to reduce this 22% deduction as i wont be getting any benefits...
 

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But it is possible you'll wind up getting something for your contributions.

While you're in France, you'll be covered by the sécu (national health insurance) which is definitely worth something. And, while I don't know what the minimum is for time served, you may well find that you're entitled to a stipend pension when the time comes. A friend of mine worked in Switzerland for 3 years, and now she gets 50 CHF a year in pension payment. It ain't much, but it's something.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the reply. Health insurance is definitely a good benefit. In wiki i saw that minimum number of years of contribution to the retirement fund in order to receive a full pension is 40 years. And 10% decrease per missing contribution year.!! I didn't understand that.
Also since i have CDI contract, can my company force me to go back from France? I have read that French labour laws are very strong.
 

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The retirement thing is complicated - and actually, they have been moving toward requiring 42 years of service for a "full" retirement pension. But there is some provision for receiving at least a token amount (or sometimes a one time pay out) with just a few years of contributions.

As far as the CDI is concerned, as long as you're employed by the same employer, you can continue to renew your carte de séjour (i.e. your residence permit). While it's not impossible to terminate you, it requires a certain, very specific procedure - so yes, French labour laws are pretty strong. They don't, however, override the immigration laws.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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It is very important that you keep all the documents you will have relating to your employment in France, including salary and your national identity number, which will be useful when the time comes for you to file a claim for any pension you may be entitled to.

For very small amounts, as Bev has said, there is sometimes a single payment but it's worth having!
 
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