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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, I’ve been reading as much as I can find on here about applying for the Passeport Talent visa. I'll start with our specific circumstances. I’ll try to be as concise as possible.

My wife and I are buying a house in SW France. Our intent is to live there year round. I am a freelance musician and she is an arts administration employee / freelancer (depending on how this all shakes out) for a music ensemble in Chicago. We have enough contract work at various points over the next year (outside of France) to support ourselves and pay our mortgage (which has already been secured with a french bank). The ideal plan is for my wife to be able to work remotely for the Chicago company in France, both continuing to do her normal duties while also adding the in-France-specific work of seeking out development opportunities for the ensemble in France and in other countries in the EU. It is our understanding that this situation is only legit if we are granted a passeport talent visa, which would also enable me to seek out work in France in addition to outside its borders.

We have an appt at the Chicago consul next week. We are trying to decide whether to go for the passeport talent or play it safe and go for a long stay visitor visa and try to build a more substantial case for the p-t when we’re over there. The advantage is that with the p-t up front we’d be we’d have a more manageable financial situation and we’d be a few steps closer to our eventual goal of permanent residency. The disadvantage is that we’re worried our pitch might be a longshot and getting declined could keep us here in the states another month or longer.

I have two main concerns that I’m hoping those with experience can weigh in on:

1) We received an email from a consul at the Chicago office in which he suggested that we *may* be eligible for the “national or international fame/renown” rubric. We recognize this is not an airtight fit though. This renown, if we are able to prove it (which I think we can, they have impressive performance history in France), is not her’s but that of the US ensemble she will be contracted to represent. Has anyone had similar experience with applying has a 'representative of renown'?

2) Will the fact that we are purchasing a home to live in full time land in our favor by giving evidence that we our serious about integrating with the culture and that we are supporting the local economy through property taxes, utilities, insurance, local goods … or will it appear presumptuous for us to have purchased a home prior to securing a visa and thus anger them?

Please respond if you have input, especially if it’s re: something we’re not considering in all this (besides the obvious that it might be risky to buy without having this stuff sorted).

Thanks for any help,
jt
 

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The passeport talent visa is still relatively new, so it may be difficult to find enough folks who were successful in obtaining one to be able to draw too many general conclusions.

As far as the "fame" of your organizations, it might be useful if you could show some form of support from said famous organization for your project. Showing that they are behind your efforts could help convince the consulate of your sincerity.

OTOH, the purchase of property in France probably won't make that much of a difference either way. Lots of folks buy "vacation homes" in France and unless it's a chateau or something, it doesn't really carry any weight in the visa process. (The French attitude toward money and investment is rather different from the US attitude.)

And you mention getting a visitor visa as a backup. Just be aware that, on a visitor visa, you will not be allowed to work in France. (Having your primary residence in France while working is enough to make you "tax resident" in France - which complicates matters even more.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And you mention getting a visitor visa as a backup. Just be aware that, on a visitor visa, you will not be allowed to work in France. (Having your primary residence in France while working is enough to make you "tax resident" in France - which complicates matters even more.)
Cheers,
Bev
Thank you for the reply, Bev. Regarding the last paragraph, the contract work would mean for example me leaving France for about a month to work in the UK (for which I will def have a temp work visa from UK) and my wife leaving for 6 weeks to work in California. Are you saying that if France is our primary residence that even traveling outside of France to work is a problem?
 

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Thank you for the reply, Bev. Regarding the last paragraph, the contract work would mean for example me leaving France for about a month to work in the UK (for which I will def have a temp work visa from UK) and my wife leaving for 6 weeks to work in California. Are you saying that if France is our primary residence that even traveling outside of France to work is a problem?
There are 3 criteria for determining if you are tax resident in France. Meet any one of the three and you are considered tax resident - and thus should be paying not only French income tax, but French "cotisations" (which are the social insurances).

The first of these involves having your primary residence in France.

The issue, I guess, is that working anywhere in Europe involves being properly registered for taxes and social insurances. If you're working in the UK (on a contract or otherwise), you aren't necessarily going to be enrolled in the NHS (which is also residence-based, like the CPAM is).

What you probably ought to be doing is establishing a business entity in France - to register with and pay your cotisations (and possibly taxes) - and then billing your customers/contracts as a French company. It might actually help your visa application if you could present a plan that included what form of business entity you are going to operate under, etc. because that shows that you are planning on "integrating" to the extent of complying with all the laws on taxes and cotisations and becoming part of the French social insurance system.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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