Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a US Citizen living in Philadelphia w/ recently granted UK Spousal VISA. I've received multiple job offers for companies in London. The strange thing is that all the offers are lateral salary moves, which from Philadelphia to London is nothing less than a step down. It's not for lack of interest by the companies, they say that what they are offering me is market value there. I'm wondering if anyone has had similar experiences and/or advice on salary parity in London and the US.

The most recent offer I received was a lateral salary move and instead of relocation bonus, they offered an advance on part of my salary as reimbursement for relocation expenses, tax-free. My job is actually as a Recruiter, and although I've done plenty of relocations for candidates, I've never heard of relocation expenses coming out of salary as an advance, it's always been in addition to the salary.

Very interested in other folks' experiences with this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I'm a US Citizen living in Philadelphia w/ recently granted UK Spousal VISA. I've received multiple job offers for companies in London. The strange thing is that all the offers are lateral salary moves, which from Philadelphia to London is nothing less than a step down. It's not for lack of interest by the companies, they say that what they are offering me is market value there. I'm wondering if anyone has had similar experiences and/or advice on salary parity in London and the US.

The most recent offer I received was a lateral salary move and instead of relocation bonus, they offered an advance on part of my salary as reimbursement for relocation expenses, tax-free. My job is actually as a Recruiter, and although I've done plenty of relocations for candidates, I've never heard of relocation expenses coming out of salary as an advance, it's always been in addition to the salary.

Very interested in other folks' experiences with this.
I would say that you are very lucky to have received job offer even before moving to the UK !
Congratulation on that because it is normally quite difficult to get the first job (if you do not have any UK work experience). I am not sure why you expect them to pay for your relocation (as you are coming here on a spouse visa and not on a specific work visa linked to the employer). Unless your work is very specialised I would imagine they can find candidates here in the UK without having to pay for relocation..??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
I haven't gotten my visa yet, but I'd say with the economy as it is, you are very lucky to have a job before leaving the states.

They didn't headhunt you, you applied to them because you were already moving; so I'd be surprised that they would give you any relocation pay.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback. I do specialize in recruitment for a very niche market, there are probably less than 30 people who do it in the world. Either way the relocation in this case is just a way to be creative with compensation. I guess the way I'm looking at it, if I'd be relocating a candidate from London to Philly or from San Francisco to NYC, etc., the package would reflect the cost of living differential. Is the economy so different in London that the pays are actually lower?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Salaries that I've seen in the less expensive areas are similar in England to what they are in the US, after the exchange rate is factored in. With the cost of living in London, it'll be a huge step down, but that's really a London thing, not your company's fault.

I live and work in a suburb of L.A., making about half of what I would in L.A. The job postings I've seen in the town in England I'm moving to, about 40 miles south of London, pay about the same as what I make now. If I had to live in either L.A. or London on that salary, I wouldn't be able to make it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Thanks for the feedback. I do specialize in recruitment for a very niche market, there are probably less than 30 people who do it in the world. Either way the relocation in this case is just a way to be creative with compensation. I guess the way I'm looking at it, if I'd be relocating a candidate from London to Philly or from San Francisco to NYC, etc., the package would reflect the cost of living differential. Is the economy so different in London that the pays are actually lower?
But you are moving to the UK anyway and you sought them out, so I don't think that they'd even consider offering you re-lo when you're going to move there anyway, especially when it's likely a domestic posting that you've applied to and they could easily hire and train a UK candidate.

And yes, I've fallen into that trap as well.... I've blindly applied for positions in the U.S. in the past, just to see how my Canadian CV stacks up and none of my would-be employers would ever consider offering relo, given that it was a domestic ad that I was replying to and there are plenty of local candidates in the area.

In regards to the lack of salary parity... unfortunately, that's something that only the marketplace can control. I make what I thought was a decent wage here in Vancouver, but a recent look (i.e. yesterday) shows that for the same position in Calgary with my experience, I could easily be making 7-10$/hr more (and that would be augmented by a lower cost of living in Alberta, a lower income tax rate and a 7% sales tax rate as opposed to 12% in BC).

Conversely, thanks to a very strong union, I make a better wage here in Canada than I would in most places in the USA, if a similar posting to my current job were up for offer.

I know it's terrible that you see your job offers as being lateral or a step down salary wise, but that's the risk we take when we move from one job market to another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,676 Posts
I'm a US Citizen living in Philadelphia w/ recently granted UK Spousal VISA. I've received multiple job offers for companies in London. The strange thing is that all the offers are lateral salary moves, which from Philadelphia to London is nothing less than a step down. It's not for lack of interest by the companies, they say that what they are offering me is market value there. I'm wondering if anyone has had similar experiences and/or advice on salary parity in London and the US.

The most recent offer I received was a lateral salary move and instead of relocation bonus, they offered an advance on part of my salary as reimbursement for relocation expenses, tax-free. My job is actually as a Recruiter, and although I've done plenty of relocations for candidates, I've never heard of relocation expenses coming out of salary as an advance, it's always been in addition to the salary.

Very interested in other folks' experiences with this.
Thanks for the feedback. I do specialize in recruitment for a very niche market, there are probably less than 30 people who do it in the world. Either way the relocation in this case is just a way to be creative with compensation. I guess the way I'm looking at it, if I'd be relocating a candidate from London to Philly or from San Francisco to NYC, etc., the package would reflect the cost of living differential. Is the economy so different in London that the pays are actually lower?
I think they are actually being generous considering you are moving on your own.

The economy in the UK in general is way different. Salaries are lower and disposable income much lesser than in the US.

If I were you, I would take the offer and will pay the necessary dues. Then in 6 months time, and after your name is around and you have put the UK experience in your CV, you can look around for something better.

My personal experience has been great. My employer matched (didn't exchange) the figures of my salary and gave me some extra perks I didn't have back in Philadelphia, and once I relocate to my next post, my salary will be exchanged from (GBP£) to (US$) which will give me a nice pay rise.

Animo
(Cheers)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi Jrge, thanks for the comment. Because I'm in recruitment, it takes a significant amount of time to build up clients (and commission) in a new market, so moving again in 6 months is something I'm hoping to avoid and make the right choice the first time!

I'm currently making $65k salary ($240k OTE) and the offer is for £40K salary (unlimited OTE) So to start, I'll be making a quarter of what I make now, in a city much more expensive. I guess at some point one just has to take the plunge and I'm interested to know how other folks have experienced this decision making process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
$65K at the current exchange becomes £42334.50. Considering the economic climate and the extremely competitive job market here in the UK, I'd say you aren't losing that much, especially with the unlimited OTE, and have actually done outstandingly well. Congrats! Great new husband AND a job before you even arrive, wowsa!

US Dollars to Pounds (USD/GBP) and Pounds to US Dollars Currency Converter.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
$65K at the current exchange becomes £42334.50. Considering the economic climate and the extremely competitive job market here in the UK, I'd say you aren't losing that much, especially with the unlimited OTE, and have actually done outstandingly well. Congrats! Great new husband AND a job before you even arrive, wowsa!

US Dollars to Pounds (USD/GBP) and Pounds to US Dollars Currency Converter.
Completely agree with A_i_S.... plus everything is relative... the cost of living is definitely higher in the UK than it is in North America, but you'll be paid in £ and not USD.

I'd take a look around at the cost of different things as well, and compare the price in PA to the price in the UK... the cost of housing is stupidly expensive but there are things* that are definitely cheaper the UK than in the USA, so it all evens out in the end. PLUS you get really inexpensive healthcare (non-HMO) without having to figure out how the hell you're going to pay for it (just imagine, doctor's visits without the co-pay)... after a year in the UK, you'll get free hospital care as well.

So, the USD $2k supposed "loss" in salary is (imnsho) more than made up for by all of the hidden perks of the market you're entering (unlimited OTE, virtually free health care, lower cost on day to day living items etc).




*take for example, the book Fifty Shades of Grey... at Amazon.com, it's USD $9.57 (£6.23) + tax and shipping (if your order is <$25) whilst at Amazon.co.uk the exact same book is £3 (USD $4.61) and it INCLUDES the appropriate VAT and the book qualifies for free shipping... sometimes you can find it for slightly cheaper at a local bricks and mortar store (am thinking Waterstones, Blackwell's, and Foyles... the UK's answer to B&N/Borders), and while I don't know about you, I'd rather spend <$5 on a book in London than more than twice as much for the same book in America
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,065 Posts
You're in a pretty unique situation that very few people are going to be able to relate to. Not very many people come to the UK on a spouse visa who also have a job offer in their field. Many people come over on spouse visas and struggle to find work of any kind, much less something in their field. If you were an economic migrant, you might decide that the financial side outweighs the experience of working in another country and turn down the job. However, you are coming because you want to live with your wife and not solely to advance your career. As others have said, in this economy you're extremely fortunate to have a job offer at all.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,065 Posts
*take for example, the book Fifty Shades of Grey... at Amazon.com, it's USD $9.57 (£6.23) + tax and shipping (if your order is <$25) whilst at Amazon.co.uk the exact same book is £3 (USD $4.61) and it INCLUDES the appropriate VAT and the book qualifies for free shipping... sometimes you can find it for slightly cheaper at a local bricks and mortar store (am thinking Waterstones, Blackwell's, and Foyles... the UK's answer to B&N/Borders), and while I don't know about you, I'd rather spend <$5 on a book in London than more than twice as much for the same book in America
However, if you wanted to read that book on a Kindle it would cost you $79 purchase it in the US, while the exact same product costs £89 ($137) in the UK. When I compare like for like on products that I use, in most cases I find them to be cheaper in the US and I'll stock up on them when I return to the US for a visit. I have, however found some store brand replacements for some items which are of good quality and cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,676 Posts
Hi Jrge, thanks for the comment. Because I'm in recruitment, it takes a significant amount of time to build up clients (and commission) in a new market, so moving again in 6 months is something I'm hoping to avoid and make the right choice the first time!

I'm currently making $65k salary ($240k OTE) and the offer is for £40K salary (unlimited OTE) So to start, I'll be making a quarter of what I make now, in a city much more expensive. I guess at some point one just has to take the plunge and I'm interested to know how other folks have experienced this decision making process.
You will indeed take two steps backwards, but the salary you've been offered isn't that "bad" and you are very blessed to have that offer, trust me! (Average salary here is £25K)

Just be prepared to adjust your monthly budget until your client base grows. And...send your spouse to work!:D

Animo
(Cheers)
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top