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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I am moving to Paris imminently. I have the contract for my job. But I now need to find somewhere to live.

This is proving absolutely impossible.

Work will pay for the first month in a furnished apartment, but I cannot even find this!

And after that I had planned to find a local agent to find something more permanent, but I'm worried that could be difficult.

Perhaps I should take the plunge and get a 6 month apartment without looking at it. But I dont even know where I can find something like this.

Anyone got any ideas? or any advice?

So far I have had no luck with:
Paris Attitude
Vingt Paris
Janet Cole Paris
 

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What do you mean by you've had no luck? No available apartments? Or nothing that meets your needs/budget, etc?

Try the FUSAC F U S A C for short-term rentals. (Check both the big and the small ads.) You could also try finding an "apart-hotel" in or around Paris. That would give you a place to stay until you could get out and around with an agent to look at regular flats to rent.

Just be aware that a normal residential rental (i.e. unfurnished) involves a 3 year lease. You can get out of the lease with proper notice, etc., but anything with a shorter rental term is covered by the same laws that cover hotel and vacation rentals.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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In Paris, do unfurnished rents go up every year? So if you sign on for a 3 year lease, will the rent go up every year of those three or does it lock in at the rented rate?
The rent increase is usually written into the 3-year lease. It can be fixed, but most often it's set in terms of an official index of cost of living published by INSEE (the French statistical agency).
Cheers,
Bev
 
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Lodgis.com, Paris & New York apartments rentals & sale = best agency so far and very reliable.

Also Parisattitude.com is good - I dont have a bad experience with them they have very accurate pics and are one of the largest agencies preferred by expats. I suggest best would be to book a temporary 3 month rental and while in Paris look for a longer term rental...it's not easy to find a good apartment in Paris unless you are willing to shell out loads of money.
 

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I am also finding it difficult to find a place in Paris, I have just got an internship in Paris for 6 months. And to go the official route to get an apartment seems very difficult - for example need a French based guarantor. There seem to be a lot of adverts around and rooms but a lot don’t respond and etc... and some are fraudulent seems a very difficult process to find decent accommodation when an intern with short term contract and small wage...Any advice would be most welcome!!!
 

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Just some thoughts for you timothyjames... There is usually an easy way to get an apartment, it usually goes through intermediaries like agencies, and it's often much more expensive or full of fees but has the convenience of not having to do any leg work yourself. I don't actually live in Paris yet, but I do have experience looking for apartments in ways that jump off the more comfortable path here in New York and also in other cities and I've been doing some steady research on the Parisian rental scene. So take this for whatever it's worth and anyone should feel free to jump in and put me in my place if I'm wrong.

You can look in pap.fr, FUSAC, the papers, private signs on buildings, wherever, but ultimately if what you want is to deal directly with an owner or landlord you'll have to hit the streets and pound the pavement making appointments for yourself. You will also have to have your finances in good order before presenting yourself to someone renting an apartment. In Paris, the law is on the side of the renter and therefore, a prospective tenant coming from an agency that has already looked into you is far more reliable than someone walking in off the street. Completely understandable, I'd say. This is why they may say that they want to see up to a year of rent locked up in an account. By law, you can take off whenever you want with 90 days notice. So they need to know, for example, that you won't split in the middle of July leaving them with an empty apartment through August when everyone's gone from the city. They can't stop it from happening anyway, but obviously someone willing to lock up a big amount of money for rent is probably more responsible and less likely to disappear.

I think you need to show up to see apartments the way you would show up for a job interview; well presented, with papers in hand, pleasant, showing them "I don't come approved by an agency but I am completely legitimate and I keep my word and I am committed to being a good tenant that isn't a risk." And even then, some of them simply won't care anyway even after showing you the place. The key, I think, is to see lots of places, get a feel for yourself for how the visits go and as always in these things, learn to compromise. It is always the name of the game when looking for your own apartments in any city. Don't set your hopes on anything that isn't an absolute must. And even then, look over your absolute musts and see which ones you can be flexible with. I used to think there was no way I'd live in an apartment in Paris without a full oven and range on top. But I realise that cuts down on a certain number of apartments and I can just buy a double burner somewhere when I get there and get a nice big powerful toaster oven. And I actually DO cook! Walking into a place and saying, "What? There's no stove?" are the kinds of warning signs to landlords or guardiens that you may be more than they want to handle. 'Make it work' becomes the motto when living in cities like this.

Again, I could be wrong because I haven't spent a single day yet walking around looking for apartments, but I think these things will help you find your own place and help you look as ideal a candidate as possible. People living in Paris... PLEASE feel free to tear apart what I've said here. As I said, it ONLY comes from research and lots and lots of reading here and on other forums, not from actually doing it myself. Does no good to give him bad advice, right? :eek:
 
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I think its impossible for a foreigner to arrive in Paris and rent an apartment the way normal french people do. You have no choice but to go through english speaking agencies and pay them the fees etc, it's usually 1 month fee, 2 months security deposit and if you have no french job or french guarantor then be prepared to put away 6 months rent in a bank garantie - unfortunately there is no other way around this. Oh and good luck getting the Bank Garantie...if you know anything about how lazy french banks and bank managers are....lol. People don't like to work in France....agents will not call you back....landlords won't care to respond... there is too much demand for housing in Paris and too little supply - so no one cares...and anyway the mentality is to work as little as possible and make as much as possible - this is not necessarily a bad mentality because in many ways I do exactly the same myself...lol....that's also why France is a more enjoyable laid back country...if you want quick services then go to UK or USA...

Sometimes if you don't have a lot of money to throw away upfront on renting - it's better to find a roommate situation, much easier and most people will not be as difficult. The laws concerning tenancy in France are very strict and totally against the landlords - you can't blame them for being so difficult really....with a roommate though the laws are much easier.
 

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I should state that in addition to what I said, I do also speak French which is also an essential and somewhat obvious part of making all those things go smoother. ;)

A few things, moving2france...
"there is too much demand for housing in Paris and too little supply - so no one cares" - I'm in New York, and outside of Hong Kong, London, Tokyo, and Moscow there is no city that comes close to the demand for housing in any of these cities. I'm not saying it's not a tough market in Paris, just that from where I was giving my advice to James1983 was from the perspective of a place with one the toughest markets in the world. 6-12 months rent secured in a bank is nothing compared to having to prove to a landlord that your salary is three times the amount of 1 year's complete rent and also having to pay the agent 15 per cent of the first year's rent. And that is for the cheapest apartments. Often, a guarantor won't help, so they'll just ask you to pay the whole year up front. No, none of these are typos. I can't imagine what the condo rental market is like, I'm just talking about the average apartments that people rent. But alas, this isn't about New York.

"You have no choice but to go through english speaking agencies... be prepared to put away 6 months rent in a bank garantie" - from what I've read, and I could be wrong, it's precisely when you DON'T go through agencies that you have to be willing to lock up a year's rent in a bank account as well. I think the moderator had said that to me and I've read it elsewhere since.

Anyway, james found a place and I'm sure he's happy. James, maybe you can tell us what things helped you secure your place?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
After a few weeks of painfully slow back and forth with three big agencies, none of which had anything suitable available, i became aware of Fusac as recommended by someone on here

i sent the same email to the following agencies:

maximhome.fr
rentparisnow.com
furnished-apartments-rental.com
Qhi paris (no website the contact is: [email protected])
rentparisnow.com

They all got back to me very quickly and were all very helpful and eager to find something for me - as you would expect from an agent!

Within a day i had my sights set on a particular apartment and was lucky enough to be in Paris the following day so went to see it. . .paid the first month's rent, need to pay the deposit (one months rent) when i move in and that's it - no guarantors or full years rent needed

Its a one bed apartment which i prefer to a studio

It seems a bit too good to be true actually so will keep you posted how i get on - i move next Monday!

Knowing my luck I will probably turn up just as the building is getting demolished or something
 

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A few things, moving2france...
"there is too much demand for housing in Paris and too little supply - so no one cares" - I'm in New York, and outside of Hong Kong, London, Tokyo, and Moscow there is no city that comes close to the demand for housing in any of these cities. I'm not saying it's not a tough market in Paris, just that from where I was giving my advice to James1983 was from the perspective of a place with one the toughest markets in the world. 6-12 months rent secured in a bank is nothing compared to having to prove to a landlord that your salary is three times the amount of 1 year's complete rent and also having to pay the agent 15 per cent of the first year's rent. And that is for the cheapest apartments. Often, a guarantor won't help, so they'll just ask you to pay the whole year up front. No, none of these are typos. I can't imagine what the condo rental market is like, I'm just talking about the average apartments that people rent. But alas, this isn't about New York.
I would say that is the worst case scenario in NYC. There are plenty of agents that don't require a salary that is 3x the rent or a 15% fee. During my NY years, I had an apartment on Bleecker and MacDougal, another off of Bedford (Williamsburg) and a third amazing apartment on Lorimer Street (large one bedroom with a private backyard 3 blocks from the L) and didn't have to do anything crazy to get them-other than to be quick! I was given a credit check and paid first and last month's rent and a one month agency fee. You just have to look a bit harder for those types of agencies--but they exist! :cool:

In London, we did have to pre-pay 6 months of rent. It didn't go in an escrow account or anything, we just paid it all to the landlord and then didn't have to pay rent again until our 7th month. We did find it easier in London in the sense that there didn't seem to be the issue you find in NYC where the minute it is posted online 3 people are calling to put in an application. We got the apartment we wanted (on day 3 of looking.) What we did find in London was that most flats online were old ads of places that had been rented long ago. In fact, our agency in London put our flat that we had just let on Right Move AFTER we rented it. :rolleyes: I'm a bit jaded now and when we go to Nice don't intend to get too attached to any ads--just to find a broker and literally see what they have.
 
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I've lived in London and NYC too and I still find Paris to be the most difficult to rent a long term proper apartment - maybe also because agents in Paris dont work as hard or care as much as they do in London and New York. In NYC - I was able to view 10 apartments a day and see over a 100 before I decided on one...if you try doing that in Paris they will never put up with it. It's difficult to find a GOOD apartment in Paris, and there are a lot of bad apartments in Paris.

Also its easier if you have a job in France - for me it was even more difficult because I don't work and live off independent income so proving that to french landlords is tricky - and the only way around is to get a bank garantie. In London and NYC if you offer 3 months rent upfront at least they are willing to give you a lease - in Paris even if I offered to pay 3 months upfront + 2 months security deposit + 15% of the years rent in fees - they still did not agree to give me a 1 year lease, not on the type of apartment I wanted. In some bad apartments they are more flexible but not at all for the higher end. The tenancy laws in France are against the landlord and in favour of the tenant that's why they are extra cautious.
 
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