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Paid for kids college..now it is our turn. My husband and I are in our early 50's and are looking into just picking up and moving for 6 mos...maybe a year...maybe forever. We are adventurous and have travelled quite a bit. We want the experience of a new culture. We will be giving up the security of our paychecks and family at least for the short term, Has anyone else done this?
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum!

The exact process of moving overseas depends quite a bit on how you intend to do things. I chucked it all and moved overseas at the age of 40 or so, and so I first had to find a job so that I'd have an employer to handle all that visa stuff. If you're planning on working, you'll more or less have to go that route, too.

To do some sort of "early retirement" or "extended sabbatical" you need to consult the website of your local Italian Consulate to see what the procedure is for getting a visa without work privileges. It will help if you have family ties to Italy and if you speak the language reasonably well.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Great info. We really are at the begining stages of what all this will take...I have been doing a lot of reading on line too. As with anyuthing, there is a lot more "process" than I realized, but it is all good. There is also a slight possibility of a job transfer which would make things a lot easier. Thanks
 

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We will not be forfieting a pension...those days are gone at most US companies. With a little luck we may get a job transfer...but doubtful. Maybe we can get work at the Villa Casale once we find the "handsome English speaking manager"!
 

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Hi, there, my husband and I live in New York State, U.S.A., and my heritage is Italian. I speak it decently (dialect), and my passion is to live in Italy. We will be retiring; we bought a new 2 bedroom home in Calabria this past July after a careful process of searching and deciding. We are very excited. We hope to sell our home here and be there by maybe October, hopefully!
It would be great to put together a nice group and once in a while speak English, right? If anyone knows how to ship a car there cheaply, please let me know.
Thanks.
MaryAnn
 

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If anyone knows how to ship a car there cheaply, please let me know.
Thanks.
MaryAnn
Unless it's a classic car honestly don't bring your car.

Think of it this way gasoline is currently around 1.3 a litre. So over $7 US an US gallon. The Prius is considered a high mileage car in the US but around here it's just average. If you factor in the cost of shipping. Getting the car legal. The higher cost for repairs.
 

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It's time

Paid for kids college..now it is our turn. My husband and I are in our early 50's and are looking into just picking up and moving for 6 mos...maybe a year...maybe forever. We are adventurous and have travelled quite a bit. We want the experience of a new culture. We will be giving up the security of our paychecks and family at least for the short term, Has anyone else done this?
My husband and I are positioning ourselves to do just the same; sellling the house and wrapping up our work. It seems as though the "kids" got the best of us....and now it's time to rekindle "US". Please keep in touch how your plans are playing out. Best of luck to you both!!!
 

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Paid for kids college..now it is our turn. My husband and I are in our early 50's and are looking into just picking up and moving for 6 mos...maybe a year...maybe forever. We are adventurous and have travelled quite a bit. We want the experience of a new culture. We will be giving up the security of our paychecks and family at least for the short term, Has anyone else done this?
Ciao a tutti,
We are doing the same, and have already purchased a house in capestrano (abruzzo region). We would like to live there permanently in less than 2 years. If anyone has any info on visas and residency in italy that they would share that would be great. Things to consider are, should we remain US citizens, or should we be dual citizens. I have heard that to remain US citizens you have to return to the US for a short time every couple of years. I will not be needing to work there, but I might do some renovation work just to keep busy. We are in the process now of getting things together here (real estate, money) to position ourselves to be self sufficient in italy. Again any advice would be appreciated.
Bill
 

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Can't tell you much about the Italian visa process, but I can tell you that there is no need to return to the US periodically in order to maintain your US citizenship when living abroad. You are supposed to continue to file tax returns, declaring your worldwide income - but failure to do so won't affect your citizenship.

The question of taking or not taking Italian citizenship is one for you to decide after you have lived there long enough to be eligible for naturalization. It usually takes about 5 years or so of residence. In practical terms, about the only big advantage (besides that of having an EU nationality) is that of being able to vote where you live.

Giving up your US citizenship is actually quite difficult these days. And doing so can subject you to various penalties if they suspect you're renouncing your nationality "for tax reasons."
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Can't tell you much about the Italian visa process, but I can tell you that there is no need to return to the US periodically in order to maintain your US citizenship when living abroad. You are supposed to continue to file tax returns, declaring your worldwide income - but failure to do so won't affect your citizenship.

The question of taking or not taking Italian citizenship is one for you to decide after you have lived there long enough to be eligible for naturalization. It usually takes about 5 years or so of residence. In practical terms, about the only big advantage (besides that of having an EU nationality) is that of being able to vote where you live.

Giving up your US citizenship is actually quite difficult these days. And doing so can subject you to various penalties if they suspect you're renouncing your nationality "for tax reasons."
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks Bev,

Remaining a US citizen is the way to go, I have read that we may have to pay italian taxes also but would get credit on US taxes for that, still researching that one though.
From what I see the first step is to get a visa from the italian consulate showing proof of income to be self sufficient, and then when in italy applying for a permit to stay and then a certificate of residency.
I guess there would really be no reason that we would need to become italian citizens.
Bill
 

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Ciao a tutti, We are doing the same, and have already purchased a house in capestrano (abruzzo region). We would like to live there permanently in less than 2 years. If anyone has any info on visas and residency in italy that they would share that would be great. Things to consider are, should we remain US citizens, or should we be dual citizens. I have heard that to remain US citizens you have to return to the US for a short time every couple of years. I will not be needing to work there, but I might do some renovation work just to keep busy. We are in the process now of getting things together here (real estate, money) to position ourselves to be self sufficient in italy. Again any advice would be appreciated. Bill
sorry Bill, cant advise on that one
 

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Hi Bill,

Where did they move the Highlander Bar to after the earthquake? We were in Capestrano in October and couldn't find it. You'll have to visit across the valley in Ofena, lots of expats have bought there.

Barry
 

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Hi Bill,

Where did they move the Highlander Bar to after the earthquake? We were in Capestrano in October and couldn't find it. You'll have to visit across the valley in Ofena, lots of expats have bought there.

Barry
Hi Barry,
I was also in capestrano at the end of October. I don't know of any place called the Highlander bar, there is a pub that serves Guinness on tap. The owners name is Fernando and he is originally from capestrano then moved to Boston as a child only to come back to capestrano to live now. The place is new and I think he relocated it from down the street, maybe that was the place. It is in the village center with a green sign hanging out front. There is also a small place across the center that serves caffe, pannini, and sells a few other things. The restaurant in the center, I was told had earthquake damage, so they are working on getting that back together, I heard the first floor fell to the ground.
I have been to ofena and it is nice, It can almost be seen from my terrace just a small hill across my street that blocks the view, but I can see the town above it.
Do you visit capestrano often, do you have a house in the area?
Bill
 

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The Highlander Bar use to be beside the pharmacy. Beer and a panini then across the piazza for a gelato!
We have a house in Carrufo. Part of Villa Santa Lucia just above Ofena but no bar or store so we have to go to Ofena, Capestrano or up to Castel Del Monte for liquid refreshment or a meal.
Check out the "Moving to Ofena" thread for lots of expats in the valley including one, Mia Solas, with a house in Capestrano.

Barry
 

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Be aware that getting a residenza elettiva visa for Italy from the US is NOT easy -- I just went through the process -- consulate demanded a minimum of 48,000 eu in guaranteed annual income plus deeds to house or long-term lease in Italy before even considering our application (family of 2). Not sure, but I think our 1 year Schengen visa must be renewed (and reviewed) annually until we apply for Italian citizenship.
 

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Be aware that getting a residenza elettiva visa for Italy from the US is NOT easy -- I just went through the process -- consulate demanded a minimum of 48,000 eu in guaranteed annual income plus deeds to house or long-term lease in Italy before even considering our application (family of 2). Not sure, but I think our 1 year Schengen visa must be renewed (and reviewed) annually until we apply for Italian citizenship.
Hi Jim
48,000eu, that's crazy, who needs that much a year to live a simple life in italy, my italy house has no mortgage. I don't even spend the equivalent of that in US dollars here, and I have a mortgage, 3 vehicles, a small business, 2 rental properties, and all the insurance and everything else to maintain this crazy american lifestyle! Thanks for the info Jim, has anyone else found this to be the case?
:confused: Bill
 

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Ok, this is what I have found on the internet concerning income requirements to enter italy with a visa. According to the info in these tables for 2 people to get a 1 year visa it would require 12676.78 euros proof of funds to stay for the year, if I am doing the math right, which I think I am. Also for a residency visa(retirement without working) you need to show proof of residency (owning a house in italy or a long term lease), also you may need to show proof that you can leave at the end of the visa (possible prepaid airline ticket). I don't know how long you can apply for a visa using this info, but even if you had to reapply every year it is not a big deal.
Again anyone who has done this and can confirm this, it would be appreciated.
 

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We saw the same information on the Italian interior ministry website -- however, rather than argue with the Italian consulate in NYC about income limits, we gave them what they asked for -- there is no RIGHT to a visa, even if you are a property owner! And, we couldn't find any appeals process in case of a denial, so . . . rather than get a denial and have to start the process again, we simply complied. BTW I heartily agree that we won't come close to spending that amount, owning houses without mortgage, and living a simple life, but dealing with bureaucracies sometimes it's simpler to bend rather than break. Bottom line, we have gone through the process, and we do have our visas for residenza elettiva.
 

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The amount has nothing to do with the min amount to live on.

It's supposed to be high enough you will not become a drain on Italy in any way. High enough you are a positive for the country. High enough you will not work.

The other thing is it'll likely depend on the type of income. A government pension is fairly safe. If you're income comes from a company pension it's far less safe. So depending on the type of income it'll be discounted.

The numbers per day are usually for short term tourist visas. Some countries need a visa for even short visits.
 
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