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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone tell me if studying for an open university degree and working full time is an acceptable way to establish residency for the purposes of applying for a home student loan. My 19-year-old is happy to work for the next 2 years to establish her residency but she also wants to study and some universities will accept open university credits towards undergraduate degree courses, but if she studies full time under the open university will this jeopardise her ability to establish residence, even if she works full time as well? Thanks for all your help.
 

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It's three years' residence prior to her starting her degree for both home student fees and financial support, and it must not be primarily for the purposes of full-time education.
Assuming she has the right to work, then being in FT employment for 3 years will work, but studying at Open University as well may make her ineligible for support, as it's usually only given for first-time degree study. She will have to disclose her previous study on application for student support, which may rule her disqualified.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
establishing residency in UK

Thanks for replying. This is exactly what we are trying to find out - but who can give us the answer? The other route we are pondering is how many hours are full-time study and up to how many hours part time study can my daughter undertake, while still working full time, without jeopardising her ability to establish residency?
 

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Thanks for replying. This is exactly what we are trying to find out - but who can give us the answer? The other route we are pondering is how many hours are full-time study and up to how many hours part time study can my daughter undertake, while still working full time, without jeopardising her ability to establish residency?
Normally, for every year or part of a year your daughter studies towards a degree, such as on OU, she loses some entitlement to support for any new degree course she wishes to be enrolled on.
See page 5 on http://www.direct.gov.uk/prod_consu...en/@educ/documents/digitalasset/dg_200470.pdf
and
Other previous study : Higher Education: Money and Funding: Advice: www.nus.org.uk
Student Finance England (if studying in England) are getting tough on those with previous study (including OU) and can refuse part or all of financial support when transferring to a full-time degree course. Even if your daughter doesn't claim any financial support while on OU, she is still on a publicly-funded course so will affect her eligibility after transfer. The way it works is if she studies on OU for 3 years (distance learning, part time), she will lose support for the first two years of her new three-year degree course, and if she studies with OU for two years, she loses support during her first year, and so on. So if she manages to start in the second year of her new degree using credit from OU, she may not get any help at all.
She should phone the helpline and find out how previous study will affect her support on 0845 300 50 90.

As for studying while working full-time in order to qualify for home student status, the only rule is study isn't the main purpose of her stay in UK. So any distance learning she undertakes while working full-time (like 40 hours a week) should be ok. She will then be eligible for home student tuition fees, but as stated, she may not get financial support or only partial support towards a new degree. And she may be charged overseas student fees by OU.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
residency and open university

Thanks. OU will charge overseas fees - we already confirmed this. Wow. The UK really make it difficult for expat kids to set up their lives back here. You would think they would be welcomed a bit more for all the bi-or even trilingual skills and their multi-cultural, globalised, tolerant attitude to the world! Surely if a 19 year old can pick herself up, transport herself halfway around the globe, get a job within a week and save $10,000 in one year, while still supporting herself, she has to be valued for showing some kind of initiative, resilience, determination etc etc etc. So to penalise her for wanting to both work and study seems a bit short-sighted in my opinion. Or perhaps this is just a mother's point of view.
 

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Thanks. OU will charge overseas fees - we already confirmed this. Wow. The UK really make it difficult for expat kids to set up their lives back here. You would think they would be welcomed a bit more for all the bi-or even trilingual skills and their multi-cultural, globalised, tolerant attitude to the world! Surely if a 19 year old can pick herself up, transport herself halfway around the globe, get a job within a week and save $10,000 in one year, while still supporting herself, she has to be valued for showing some kind of initiative, resilience, determination etc etc etc. So to penalise her for wanting to both work and study seems a bit short-sighted in my opinion. Or perhaps this is just a mother's point of view.
That is so, and it's one of the reasons why many expat kids do their degrees abroad, or find that some other English-speaking countries can be cheaper, such as Australia and sometimes even US because of generous scholarships.
The only expats who face none of these problems are those whose families are excercising treaty rights in EU.
UK can be terribly parochial when it comes to having expats back, with little regard for international experience or qualifications. You wouldn't have thought so with the long history of the Empire and Commonwealth, but the world has moved on and in the harsh climate of recession and job shortage, people tend to look after their own.
 
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