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So I was putting together the itinerary for our trip for the application and Holy Wow! I had no idea that one-way tickets were going to be so expensive...

I know not to purchase one until our visas are in hand but in the meantime, does anyone have tips or ideas for how to get a ticket at a more reasonable price? Do you just guesstimate when your next trip home will be and buy a return one with that in mind every time? Or is there a website that specializes in finding the one way ones at a cheaper rate? A particular airline that does them? Or do you just bite the bullet and consider it one more expense of moving to the UK?

Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated!

Shelly
 

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So I was putting together the itinerary for our trip for the application and Holy Wow! I had no idea that one-way tickets were going to be so expensive...

I know not to purchase one until our visas are in hand but in the meantime, does anyone have tips or ideas for how to get a ticket at a more reasonable price? Do you just guesstimate when your next trip home will be and buy a return one with that in mind every time? Or is there a website that specializes in finding the one way ones at a cheaper rate? A particular airline that does them? Or do you just bite the bullet and consider it one more expense of moving to the UK?

Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated!

Shelly
Most people find that a roundtrip ticket is cheaper than a one-way ticket and just don't end up using the return ticket.
 

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I am in the process of researching this as well. I plan on calling some airlines and asking for prices on an open ended ticket. So far I have found the cheapest airlines to be Virgin Atlantic and British Airways. If you are a student or teacher STA has the cheapest flights I have seen. I hope that helps!
 

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Depending on the time of year when your visa is issued, finding a reasonably priced ticket may not be easy even on the 'cheap flight' sites. Round-trip or one-way, if you want to get back in a hurry you may have to pay far more than you'd like especially during tourist season.

The problem of course being that until a determination is made we are all advised not to buy a ticket. However, the clock and calendar tick over during the wait for a determination; cheap seats go quickly, 'regular' tourist travellers have the luxury of planning and timing their travels. Visa applicants just want to get home to their spouse.

My visa was issued the middle of June last year and by then ticket prices were sky-high even booked 30+ days ahead. One-way, round-trip, gah, the prices were sickening.

I flew back to Scotland @£806 (one-way because it was the first available flight not wanting a 30 day wait), crammed into what can only be called a cattle-car arrangement with the seat-back of the incredibly inconsiderate cretin ahead of me in my lap.
 

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There is always a trade-off between cost and ticket flexibility. But if you research, you often find a mid-price ticket that offers some flexibility (such as cancellation for a price), which is still miles cheaper than a last-minute flight. And since the bulk of fare is made up of taxes and charges, you may still get a significant proportion of your money back (but do check with airlines as many impose a handling fee). So despite what UKBA says, it may be worthwhile getting a partially flexible ticket bought, say, 6 months in advance of your intended travel, and should your visa fail to come through in time, you can cancel or re-book at a reasonable cost.

If you buy a return (roundtrip) ticket with the intention of only flying one-way, do cancel your return flight after you've flown, even if you get nothing back. It keeps you on the right side of your ticket's T&C and keeps the airline happy (so that they can re-sell your seat for more profit!). Usually nothing happens if you do a no-show for your return leg, but if you belong to a frequent flyer club, the airline may flag you up as rule breaker.
 
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