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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a tricky one. We are flying from the US to Germany with our dog. Then we are going to rent a car and drive to Paris to live for six months. We will get all the proper shots, certificates and paperwork to fly the dog into Germany, but do we need to jump any legal hoops to drive with him into France? I am hoping that once in an EU country (i.e., Germany), we won't need further paperwork to take the dog into another EU country. But I don't know where to go to find the answer to that question.

Thanks for any help on this. Everyone here has been so helpful with my dog food and other K9 inquiries.
 
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Depends on the time-lag between Fido arriving in Germany and arriving at teh border in France.

I know that there is a rather narrow time window ( from memory, 48 hours ) from which an animals shots have been given to them being 'imported'. That said, not a single one of our 11 animals was inspected or even mentioned by any official at all on teh day when we moved.

I'd get an authoritative answer from an official source - maybe your carrier - and hen you get it, have them put it in writing.
 

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Frankly, I wouldn't worry about it.

I moved my cats from the US to Germany and then moved them to France - 3 years later. Driving from Germany to France there is no one at the border to check for anything.

If you were moving for the long term, you would need to present all the paperwork to your vet in France (to avoid re-starting the vaccination routine) but since you're only staying for six months, there shouldn't be any problem. Hang onto the paperwork just in case your dog needs to see the vet while you're in France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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This may be a tricky one. We are flying from the US to Germany with our dog. Then we are going to rent a car and drive to Paris to live for six months. We will get all the proper shots, certificates and paperwork to fly the dog into Germany, but do we need to jump any legal hoops to drive with him into France? I am hoping that once in an EU country (i.e., Germany), we won't need further paperwork to take the dog into another EU country. But I don't know where to go to find the answer to that question.

Thanks for any help on this. Everyone here has been so helpful with my dog food and other K9 inquiries.
We're also flying into Germany and then proceeding on to France. The main reason we're doing this is because Lufthansa provides the greatest space allowances for dogs. Our dog flies in the cabin with us (see avatar). At least we'll be able to get some decent beer and sausages before we proceed to France.

We're not worried about going into France. I worked in Germany for 20 years, close to the French border and we crossed into France at least every other week, half the time with our dog. Usually there is no one at the crossing (the one after Saarbruecken on the Autobahn 8). When the police are there, its usually to check trucks. If there is a terror alert the police will be out in force and look at you to see if you resemble anyone they're looking for (If you wear a head scarf and have a long beard they may want to ask you some questions:)). If your car is loaded down with goods, giving the impression you are a smuggler, they also may also want to talk to you. Other then that, don't worry about it.
Bon Weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We're also flying into Germany and then proceeding on to France. The main reason we're doing this is because Lufthansa provides the greatest space allowances for dogs. Our dog flies in the cabin with us (see avatar). At least we'll be able to get some decent beer and sausages before we proceed to France.

We're not worried about going into France. I worked in Germany for 20 years, close to the French border and we crossed into France at least every other week, half the time with our dog. Usually there is no one at the crossing (the one after Saarbruecken on the Autobahn 8). When the police are there, its usually to check trucks. If there is a terror alert the police will be out in force and look at you to see if you resemble anyone they're looking for (If you wear a head scarf and have a long beard they may want to ask you some questions:)). If your car is loaded down with goods, giving the impression you are a smuggler, they also may also want to talk to you. Other then that, don't worry about it.
Bon Weekend.
Thank you, Coton, that makes me feel better to hear that.

We also chose Lufthansa because of the dog, but because they have the only nonstop from Detroit with a big enough plane to hold Crosby's crate. He is 80 pounds, a golden retriever. I so wish I could take him on board instead of worrying about him underneath. How great for you and your dog. I could swear they said the weight limit inside the plane was 40 pounds on Lufthansa, but later I wondered if I misheard the reservationist. Maybe it's so! But where would a 40-lb dog sit?
 

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Thank you, Coton, that makes me feel better to hear that.

We also chose Lufthansa because of the dog, but because they have the only nonstop from Detroit with a big enough plane to hold Crosby's crate. He is 80 pounds, a golden retriever. I so wish I could take him on board instead of worrying about him underneath. How great for you and your dog. I could swear they said the weight limit inside the plane was 40 pounds on Lufthansa, but later I wondered if I misheard the reservationist. Maybe it's so! But where would a 40-lb dog sit?
It was a while ago, but when I brought the cats to France, the animal shipper assured me that Lufthansa is one of the best airlines for shipping animals - and Frankfurt has the best animal handling facilities in all of Europe.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Thank you, Coton, that makes me feel better to hear that.

We also chose Lufthansa because of the dog, but because they have the only nonstop from Detroit with a big enough plane to hold Crosby's crate. He is 80 pounds, a golden retriever. I so wish I could take him on board instead of worrying about him underneath. How great for you and your dog. I could swear they said the weight limit inside the plane was 40 pounds on Lufthansa, but later I wondered if I misheard the reservationist. Maybe it's so! But where would a 40-lb dog sit?
Here's Lufthansa's pet policy:
Lufthansa - Animals

Animals up to 8KG (17.6 lbs) are allowed in the cabin so unfortunately your goldie won't be able to stay next to you. If you can avoid it, don't fly in the summer months as this is sometimes a problem with pets in the cargo hold on a hot tarmac.
(I think we need a dog smiley).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's Lufthansa's pet policy:
Lufthansa - Animals

Animals up to 8KG (17.6 lbs) are allowed in the cabin so unfortunately your goldie won't be able to stay next to you. If you can avoid it, don't fly in the summer months as this is sometimes a problem with pets in the cargo hold on a hot tarmac.
(I think we need a dog smiley).
Thank you for the link, Coton90. I'll double-check what Lufthansa told me on the phone. And I'm all for a dog smiley! Maybe a wagging tail, even. We are flying the end of November, so I'm more worried about cold than heat. However, our guy is a Michigan dog and loooooooooooooves cold weather and sitting in snow for hours. I'm more concerned about May when we fly him home to our son. We're not coming back until the middle of June, so we plan:flypig::flypig::flypig: to fly Crosby back before it heats up.

Sorry for the three flying dogs. I'm emoticon-challenged! (Are those even dogs?)
 
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