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I'm not sure if I'm doing this correctly?? But I have several questions about moving to the UK (specifically Scotland). Is it difficult for an older couple to relocate and find jobs? And where to we start? Does anyone know anything about the requirements for selling real estate in Scotland? Would someone age 65 have a problem finding a job if his entire career has been in restaurant marketing as a director and V.P? Or is it as hard for older people to find work there as it is in the US? Any help would be appreciated!


My husband and I will both be completing our PhDs in 2011 in the US. We are American citizens. We would like to move to London and get our next jobs there after we graduate.

What are the steps we need to take first to do this? And since we are married, does only one of us need to get a job first in order for us to move there? My husband would like to continue doing research, I would like to teach but am not sure if it is easy to get a teaching job over there since the education system is quite different.

Do we get a job first, then visa? Or do you need a visa before you look for a job? I really have no idea of the steps we should take first. Is there a UK government website that clearly explains the process?
 

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I'm not sure if I'm doing this correctly?? But I have several questions about moving to the UK (specifically Scotland). Is it difficult for an older couple to relocate and find jobs? And where to we start? Does anyone know anything about the requirements for selling real estate in Scotland? Would someone age 65 have a problem finding a job if his entire career has been in restaurant marketing as a director and V.P? Or is it as hard for older people to find work there as it is in the US? Any help would be appreciated!
While I need more details to give a full answer, basically, if you only have US citizenship, it will be very difficult to get a visa which enables you to live longterm in UK. While age as such isn't a barrier to finding work, you have to get a required points total based on your qualifications, experience and salary to get a kind of visa that allows you to come to UK, look for work and take up a position, called Tier 1 (General). UK Border Agency | Highly skilled workers
If you don't qualify because of lack of points, then the only other kind of visa requires a sponsorship by a prospective employer, who has to demonstrate you have skills in short supply and there are no other UK or EU applicants able to do the job, after extensive advertising.
Now even if you qualify for a Tier 1 visa, it doesn't of course guarantee a job, and frankly the job market at the moment is truly frightening, with very few jobs and 100s and 1000s of people after a single vacancy. Companies are looking to shed jobs, not recruiting, and there are very many highly skilled and experienced people looking desperately for work.
And the UK has even abolished a 'retirement' visa for people looking to retire in UK with their pensions and investment income and not needing to work. So even if you don't intend or need to work, getting the right kind of longterm visa will be very difficult.
 

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As you may have noticed, I've moved this out to a thread of its own.

As Joppa has already noted, there are fewer and fewer countries these days that offer a "retirement" visa - but in any event, a retirement visa would not allow you to work.

Finding jobs anywhere in Europe past the age of about 45 or 50 is a real "challenge," and would be even more so for a foreigner who needed a work permit/visa. Sponsoring a visa is usually quite a bureaucratic hassle for an employer (and involves fairly significant fees in most countries), so unless you have some training or experience that is in very short supply in the UK, your chances of qualifying for a visa with working privileges are pretty slim.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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While I need more details to give a full answer, basically, if you only have US citizenship, it will be very difficult to get a visa which enables you to live longterm in UK. While age as such isn't a barrier to finding work, you have to get a required points total based on your qualifications, experience and salary to get a kind of visa that allows you to come to UK, look for work and take up a position, called Tier 1 (General). UK Border Agency | Highly skilled workers
If you don't qualify because of lack of points, then the only other kind of visa requires a sponsorship by a prospective employer, who has to demonstrate you have skills in short supply and there are no other UK or EU applicants able to do the job, after extensive advertising.
Now even if you qualify for a Tier 1 visa, it doesn't of course guarantee a job, and frankly the job market at the moment is truly frightening, with very few jobs and 100s and 1000s of people after a single vacancy. Companies are looking to shed jobs, not recruiting, and there are very many highly skilled and experienced people looking desperately for work.
And the UK has even abolished a 'retirement' visa for people looking to retire in UK with their pensions and investment income and not needing to work. So even if you don't intend or need to work, getting the right kind of longterm visa will be very difficult.
I had occasion to introduce a business colleague to a well-known (and expensive) firm of immigration solicitors recently. As the colleague is sponsored by a foreign company he will probably get his visa in due course. One thing that the solicitor mentioned was that anyone with £1 million in cash will have no problem coming to the UK as an investor. This often works for someone involved in the real estate business as a principal.

In the absence of that, there are some EU-Law tricks, such as getting a work permit for Luxembourg or another EU/EEA/Swiss country and having the EU firm "assign" you to the UK for up to one year on the "Rush Portuguesa" principle. But that is only a temporary fix.
 
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