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I have received, by email, a letter stating that my VLS-TS long stay visa validation has been register and that I have paid the €200 fee. I received another giving Information relating to the medical exam. There is no mention of an interview meeting tho I have seen plenty of references elsewhere. Is an interview still required and if so what can I expect during this meeting? Especially how advanced must my Fr. Language skills be and will they be tested? All my correspondence in this process has been by email. Can I expect that to continue? Thanks for any information.
 

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Not sure what interview you are talking about, but I currently received an email relating to the medical exam too with a date on it. Here is an article that may help: https://www.americaineinfrance.com/2020/03/02/visa-validation-ofii-appointment/
Thank you, The medical exam requirement is clear. I am asking about an additional meet referred to on some sites as "OFII interview" during which , one brings the usual documents plus the stamped medical examination papers from your medical visit. During that interview language skill are evaluated, and civics training assigned. Is this interview still required?
 

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Yes, sorry! I just realized the interview you were talking about and edited my comment.

I have no idea and am in the same boat as you. I figure if it was still required, it would be mentioned in the email received when validating the visa...hoping someone who has just completed this process can respond too.
 

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It all depends on what sort of visa you are on. The VLS-TS is a designation common to several sorts of visas. If you are on something like a vie privée et familialle visa, then you'll have further meetings and classes at the OFII. If you're here on a visitor visa, the medical may be your only "in person" meeting before your titre de séjour is up for renewal a couple months before it expires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It all depends on what sort of visa you are on. The VLS-TS is a designation common to several sorts of visas. If you are on something like a vie privée et familialle visa, then you'll have further meetings and classes at the OFII. If you're here on a visitor visa, the medical may be your only "in person" meeting before your titre de séjour is up for renewal a couple months before it expires.
Sooo....Long stay visa.. deprives me of that opportunity, I take it...thank you... as per usual, a comprehensive answer..
 

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Just follow whatever instructions they give you. These things also have a tendency to change fairly quickly over time. They'll let you know if there is anything further you need to do.
 

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I have received, by email, a letter stating that my VLS-TS long stay visa validation has been register and that I have paid the €200 fee. I received another giving Information relating to the medical exam. There is no mention of an interview meeting tho I have seen plenty of references elsewhere. Is an interview still required and if so what can I expect during this meeting? Especially how advanced must my Fr. Language skills be and will they be tested? All my correspondence in this process has been by email. Can I expect that to continue? Thanks for any information.
Hello,

I am in France on a LSV-Spouse of a French National. I had to go through all of this. Here is what I can tell you thus far. I received my confirmation letter in the mail (a month or so ago) stating that I should show up at the medical clinic in Montpellier. After that, I was scheduled for my meeting on the same day (only a half-hour) later than my medical appointment. Luckily the OFII office is right around the corner from the medical center. I arrived at the medical center, not knowing where to go, or what to do, I went to the self service computer, they gave me a number, and I was then speaking with a receptionist fairly quickly. I was then told to wait, and my number would be called. I was called into a small room, given a chest x-ray, and was told to wait for my copy. Everyone was very nice, and very helpful. After I received my x-ray, I hustled over to the OFII office, I was about 15v mins. late, but I wasn't alone, as the medical center was pretty bust that day. I was directed to a classroom, where I was explained about a test we would be given, an assessment to see our level of French. Upon completing my exam, I was then seen by another doctor, who just asked me a bunch of questions about my health history in the US, basic stuff, nothing too personal. :) Upon my interview with the doctor, she gave me a medical paper that I will use for my renewal next year. She cleared me, and sent me back to the classroom. I then sat with an OFII case manager, we talked a lot, and she explained ,y "contract" that I was about to sign. It stated that I had to attend a two-day French history class, and also 100 hours of language class, as my French wasn't good enough to pass the A1 exam at this time. So now I go to class every Tuesday from 9-5, and get free French lessons! It's a nice mix of people, and the teacher is great. Everyone has been incredibly helpful, and I am impressed with how they are trying to integrate their "visitors". Once I complete the A1, I can proceed to the next level, and keep heading up the ranks, until I reach my B1, which would be needed for citizenship if I wanted to get that. I've been married to a French citizen for 25 years, but never studied the language, and we speak English at home unfortunately.

Keep an open mind, and smile a lot, it will get you far. It can be frustrating, but everyone wants to help.

Good luck!
D
 

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Hello,

I am in France on a LSV-Spouse of a French National. I had to go through all of this. Here is what I can tell you thus far. I received my confirmation letter in the mail (a month or so ago) stating that I should show up at the medical clinic in Montpellier. After that, I was scheduled for my meeting on the same day (only a half-hour) later than my medical appointment. Luckily the OFII office is right around the corner from the medical center. I arrived at the medical center, not knowing where to go, or what to do, I went to the self service computer, they gave me a number, and I was then speaking with a receptionist fairly quickly. I was then told to wait, and my number would be called. I was called into a small room, given a chest x-ray, and was told to wait for my copy. Everyone was very nice, and very helpful. After I received my x-ray, I hustled over to the OFII office, I was about 15v mins. late, but I wasn't alone, as the medical center was pretty bust that day. I was directed to a classroom, where I was explained about a test we would be given, an assessment to see our level of French. Upon completing my exam, I was then seen by another doctor, who just asked me a bunch of questions about my health history in the US, basic stuff, nothing too personal. :) Upon my interview with the doctor, she gave me a medical paper that I will use for my renewal next year. She cleared me, and sent me back to the classroom. I then sat with an OFII case manager, we talked a lot, and she explained ,y "contract" that I was about to sign. It stated that I had to attend a two-day French history class, and also 100 hours of language class, as my French wasn't good enough to pass the A1 exam at this time. So now I go to class every Tuesday from 9-5, and get free French lessons! It's a nice mix of people, and the teacher is great. Everyone has been incredibly helpful, and I am impressed with how they are trying to integrate their "visitors". Once I complete the A1, I can proceed to the next level, and keep heading up the ranks, until I reach my B1, which would be needed for citizenship if I wanted to get that. I've been married to a French citizen for 25 years, but never studied the language, and we speak English at home unfortunately.

Keep an open mind, and smile a lot, it will get you far. It can be frustrating, but everyone wants to help.

Good luck!
D
Thank you for this detailed recount of your experience! This is super helpful. I'm just curious about the language test. Do you know around what level you would have gotten the language classes waived? Or reduced in hours perhaps? Is your French fairly advanced or more beginner? i.e. do you speak regularly, get around town easily on your own, make social connections in French, etc? Just as some examples to understand your level :) I'm considering between applying for this visa as a PACSed partner of a French citizen, or considering also just staying on a visitor visa. The former is good because it would allow me to work should the opportunity arise, though that's not necessarily my plan. The latter is quicker and easier to do of course. If the vie privee et familiale will land me in a 1x weekly French class, that would be a decision factor for me, hence my digging for more details :) I'm a grad student online through a US university and while I would LOVE to better my French for free with others, my time is tight these days unfortunately.
 

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I am under the impression that if you can show proof that you have passed the A1 exam, you should be fine. With that being said, they will also get a feel for your language aptitude when you are in the interview, so I'm not 100% sure. Sorry if that's not very helpful.
 

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I have received, by email, a letter stating that my VLS-TS long stay visa validation has been register and that I have paid the €200 fee. I received another giving Information relating to the medical exam. There is no mention of an interview meeting tho I have seen plenty of references elsewhere. Is an interview still required and if so what can I expect during this meeting? Especially how advanced must my Fr. Language skills be and will they be tested? All my correspondence in this process has been by email. Can I expect that to continue? Thanks for any information.
Just went through this interview last week. After having paid and validated the VLS-TS, as you did, sometimes a month and some ago, I received a week or so ago, in the mail, an invite for a medical exam (actually X-Ray, at the Radiology Dept), followed by an interview at the OFII, in proximity of said hospital.

All went flawlessly: arrived for the X-Ray @ 8 - got in @ 8:15 - out with the results @ 8:30 - meeting @ OFII @ 8:45. We were approx 10-12 people in the room. We were welcomed by someone who explained the process of Integration Republicaine, and associated contract we were supposed to sign, then took a test for A1 level (trivial), after which each individual underwent an approx 30min interview with an associate from OFII, during which we went through details about why, how, when, what, etc, related to our presence in France.

As I passed the A1 level, I was not considered (at this time) for any additional language needs ("dispense de formation linguistique"), I signed the CIR, and ack-ed the only obligation for someone like us, at this time, which is to undergo four sessions of "formation civique". I received (had the choice of dates and times) confirmation for the first two sessions - CVH (competence et valorisation de l'humain) - in a specialized location. Again - all was seamless. I was also seen by a nurse, who completed the medical record folder with height, weight and existing medical info, and - as result of the X-Ray - produced a document "Certificat De Control Medical" - one copy for me, and one to file @ the prefecture, when applying for the carte de sejour (3 months before the VLS expires).

HTH
 

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I'm just curious about the language test. Do you know around what level you would have gotten the language classes waived? Or reduced in hours perhaps? Is your French fairly advanced or more beginner? i.e. do you speak regularly, get around town easily on your own, make social connections in French, etc?
Don't let the language requirement put you off. If you are PACSed with a French person, you should go ahead and get your vie privée et familiale carte de séjour. Just for your reference, take a look at the chart of the Common European Framework of References for Languages in Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_European_Framework_of_Reference_for_Languages
 

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Thanks for your insight! I plan to go ahead with the vie privee et familiale, so this is all really helpful to hear. Out of curiosity, for the civilization classes, were they offered in your city or did you need to travel? And where are you living if you don't mind me asking? I'm curious if these classes are offered all over or only bigger cities.
 

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Generally speaking the "civics" classes are usually offered either at or near (i.e. within walking distance) of the OFII office.

As you'll see from the chart, the A1 level is really pretty basic - and it's what's required in order to renew your carte de séjour at the end of the first year (along with your various certificates for having attended the classes and any other meetings they require as part of the contrat d'integration.
 

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Generally speaking the "civics" classes are usually offered either at or near (i.e. within walking distance) of the OFII office.

As you'll see from the chart, the A1 level is really pretty basic - and it's what's required in order to renew your carte de séjour at the end of the first year (along with your various certificates for having attended the classes and any other meetings they require as part of the contrat d'integration.
Got it, thanks Bev!
 

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Just went through this interview last week. After having paid and validated the VLS-TS, as you did, sometimes a month and some ago, I received a week or so ago, in the mail, an invite for a medical exam (actually X-Ray, at the Radiology Dept), followed by an interview at the OFII, in proximity of said hospital.

All went flawlessly: arrived for the X-Ray @ 8 - got in @ 8:15 - out with the results @ 8:30 - meeting @ OFII @ 8:45. We were approx 10-12 people in the room. We were welcomed by someone who explained the process of Integration Republicaine, and associated contract we were supposed to sign, then took a test for A1 level (trivial), after which each individual underwent an approx 30min interview with an associate from OFII, during which we went through details about why, how, when, what, etc, related to our presence in France.

As I passed the A1 level, I was not considered (at this time) for any additional language needs ("dispense de formation linguistique"), I signed the CIR, and ack-ed the only obligation for someone like us, at this time, which is to undergo four sessions of "formation civique". I received (had the choice of dates and times) confirmation for the first two sessions - CVH (competence et valorisation de l'humain) - in a specialized location. Again - all was seamless. I was also seen by a nurse, who completed the medical record folder with height, weight and existing medical info, and - as result of the X-Ray - produced a document "Certificat De Control Medical" - one copy for me, and one to file @ the prefecture, when applying for the carte de sejour (3 months before the VLS expires).

HTH
A question for you, and also anyone who has gone through the process: They ask for your vaccination history cards, correct? In the US we have a card which lists all the mandatory/recommended vaccines we have ever taken.

If they do require it-I left my card in the US...do you think a photocopy would suffice?
 

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A question for you, and also anyone who has gone through the process: They ask for your vaccination history cards, correct? In the US we have a card which lists all the mandatory/recommended vaccines we have ever taken.

If they do require it-I left my card in the US...do you think a photocopy would suffice?
We went through the process about 8 1/2 years ago and they didn't ask for a vaccination history at that time...and I can see how they'd want to do that now, unhappily.

If your OFII meeting is soon enough that you cannot get the card sent to you AND you end up needing it, by all means use a photocopy / scan of it. The worst they can do is say, "No" and ask you to get the original, as well.

The French also know their rules are sometimes quirky. If you simply tell them something doesn't exist where you're from, they will often just get it and move on. If you tell them that it was impossible to get an original of your vaccination history because all deliveries are taking a really long time now due to the pandemic...and that you've had someone scan and email you a copy (showing you're committed and resourceful!)...it's the sort of thing to which they might just say, "OK, no problem". It would be good if whatever you're going to give them appears official <s>.

Best of luck.
 
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