Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can you cross the border on foot from Laredo to Nuevo Laredo?

I have read posts about car jackings in Nuevo Laredo so I am reluctant to drive there.

How much is Mexican car insurance for 1 day? Is there a TIP bond required for longer stays in Nuevo Laredo?

Can you use a T Mobile Cell phone or a Tracfone in Nuevo Laredo?

I am interested in meeting up with ExPat Retirees in Nuevo Laredo to get info on retirement in Mexico.

:wave:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,720 Posts
On foot? Sure, if you want to.
You fear to drive, but want to walk??????
I think you will have to talk to one of the insurance places at the border. No deposit for the free zone.
It is amazing how quickly cell phone service drops when you cross the border. Good luck with that.
Expat retirees in Nuevo Laredo? Why???? Good living is a lot further south.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,006 Posts
Where is the best place to relocate further south?
Any place is better than Nuevo Laredo, no disrespect meant, of course, to those living in NL who are very happy there!

What is the "best place" depends on what you are looking for in terms of a new home in Mexico.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Any place is better than Nuevo Laredo, no disrespect meant, of course, to those living in NL who are very happy there!

What is the "best place" depends on what you are looking for in terms of a new home in Mexico.
I am primarily looking at the border towns: Nuevo Laredo, Juarez, Mexicali and Tijuana. But I really don't much about Mexico. I used to visit Baja when I lived in LA and I have been to Cancun and Puerto Vallarta on vacation.

What is wrong with Nuevo Laredo? :wave:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I am primarily looking at the border towns: Nuevo Laredo, Juarez, Mexicali and Tijuana. But I really don't much about Mexico. I used to visit Baja when I lived in LA and I have been to Cancun and Puerto Vallarta on vacation.

What is wrong with Nuevo Laredo? :wave:
Although most people assume otherwise, life in border towns can be quite enjoyable. I have been living very happily in Juarez for over 3 years now and would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

I understand that most members of this forum live further South, as it is ideal in many situations but I wish people would consider that some people have very good reasons for wanting/needing to live in a bordertown, so immediately discounting the idea it's always the best way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Can you cross the border on foot from Laredo to Nuevo Laredo?

I have read posts about car jackings in Nuevo Laredo so I am reluctant to drive there.

How much is Mexican car insurance for 1 day? Is there a TIP bond required for longer stays in Nuevo Laredo?

Can you use a T Mobile Cell phone or a Tracfone in Nuevo Laredo?

I am interested in meeting up with ExPat Retirees in Nuevo Laredo to get info on retirement in Mexico.

:wave:
I would also be happy to answer any questions about Juarez, but no experience with the other two border locations you mentioned. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts
I am primarily looking at the border towns: Nuevo Laredo, Juarez, Mexicali and Tijuana. But I really don't much about Mexico. I used to visit Baja when I lived in LA and I have been to Cancun and Puerto Vallarta on vacation.

What is wrong with Nuevo Laredo? :wave:
We drove through Nuevo Laredo at night and saw excellent shopping and a large choice of American fast food. HEB, the great Texas based grocery chain, has a huge store there. To tell you the truth it looked nicer than Laredo, TX. Drove through some nice, shady neighborhoods too. What it looks like when you cross the border into Mexico is only a part of the greater city.

What you should be concerned about is the boiling hot weather for much of the year. And yes, I have been there in the summer and have lived in Eagle Pass and McAllen. It's as severe with air conditioning needed as living inside in Canada in the winter needing heat. It's not a dry heat, you will sweat like crazy just walking outside. If you want to be near the border but have better weather consider Saltillo. And Saltillo, with decent shopping itself, is near Monterrey with about anything you could want. The mountains between Monterrey and Saltillo are amazing, and I've lived in Colorado, New Mexico, and Washington State, have seen amazing mountains.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
1. Can you cross the border on foot from Laredo to Nuevo Laredo?

2. How much is Mexican car insurance for 1 day?

:wave:
I can probably answer two of those questions. (I've numbered them but otherwise left your text intact.)

1. If the International bridge in Laredo doesn't have two way pedestrian traffic it would be astonishing, so I'm betting I can say "Yes" without having been there.

2. Yes about short term policies. If you want to shop, just Google "mexican auto insurance". I'd just as soon not even recommend my agent to you because it would smack of me having some kind of conflict-of-interest issue in regards to what I am about to tell you.

Do get a policy.

Some US insurance agents sell policies that "cover you" in the "free trade zone" (about 25 miles south of the border in most places), but what they do not tell you is that should you have an accident your US policy is not considered to be a valid auto insurance policy in Mexico.

Nor will the US adjuster even cross the border to give you an estimate for repairs. Since you car will be impounded until the matters surrounding the accident are settled -- and since you yourself will likely be in jail if anyone is hurt, a US policy will not do you any good until you get your car back to the US.

I interviewed a State Farm agent in Las Cruces about these issues, and she was not even aware of these aspects of Mexican law and thanked me for making her aware of them so she could pass them on to her clients. The US agents aren't trying to mislead anyone --- just repeating what they are told about the policy.

Having the "free trade zone" feature on your US policy is still a great idea, though. Progressive paid for a repair when someone hit my car while parked at the Rio Grande Mall in Juarez without a peep of protest.

Just don't think anything except a Mexican auto insurance policy is going to work for you in Mexico.

It should be added that any use of alcohol or drugs invalidates even your Mexican policy.

Despite these facts, tens of thousands of Americans just cruise on over in their cars and drive without incident. But it's really not a joke when something serious happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
We drove through Nuevo Laredo at night and saw excellent shopping and a large choice of American fast food. HEB, the great Texas based grocery chain, has a huge store there. To tell you the truth it looked nicer than Laredo, TX. Drove through some nice, shady neighborhoods too. What it looks like when you cross the border into Mexico is only a part of the greater city.

What you should be concerned about is the boiling hot weather for much of the year. And yes, I have been there in the summer and have lived in Eagle Pass and McAllen. It's as severe with air conditioning needed as living inside in Canada in the winter needing heat. It's not a dry heat, you will sweat like crazy just walking outside. If you want to be near the border but have better weather consider Saltillo. And Saltillo, with decent shopping itself, is near Monterrey with about anything you could want. The mountains between Monterrey and Saltillo are amazing, and I've lived in Colorado, New Mexico, and Washington State, have seen amazing mountains.
Your mention of the heat, VanTexan, is definitely something anyone moving to a Mexican border city should consider.

If you do have to walk or take the bus for transportation you're going to be spending prolonged periods exposed to the heat. Not a problem if you're a person of adequate physical stamina and stay well hydrated. But if you feel the slightest degree of vertigo or feel hypertensive, find a place to sit and cool it a while. This can happen to a 30 year old in peak physical condition, older person, anyone.

I mention these things because I know firsthand how easy it is to under estimate the slow gradual way heat saps your strength, and, as it does, it slowly saps your mind of its ability to stay focused -- hence talk of mirages some people see when lost in the desert without water. In an urban setting, even a mild heat exhaustion can make people do things like forget to look both ways before crossing a street. It just creeps up on a person.

But people from even the coldest climates learn these things very quickly and adjust just fine to the heat --- although many people who have lived here all of their lives still do not take the proper precautions such as keeping a couple of gallons of fresh water in the car when taking road trips in this region.

Conditions are just the same along the Mexican side of the border.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Sorry for all the dire warnings about the heat and car accidents. But they are things people should be aware of...

The forum can be a great place to learn a lot about many fascinating regions of Mexico, but life can be great here in the Borderland, too!

Best of luck if you decide to move to one of the places you mentioned...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,006 Posts
Sorry for all the dire warnings about the heat and car accidents. But they are things people should be aware of...

The forum can be a great place to learn a lot about many fascinating regions of Mexico, but life can be great here in the Borderland, too!

Best of luck if you decide to move to one of the places you mentioned...
Since most forum members don't live on the border, it would be nice if you could tell us what life is like there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,006 Posts
Thanks, Isla...very, very much.

But being such a literate and thoughtful person yourself you should know better by now than to ask a writer to write about something...:) They never quit once started.
You make me blush, ElPaso. Please write as much as you wish!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
You make me blush, ElPaso. Please write as much as you wish!
I know just where to start, too... For right now, though, a few other things need to get done first.

Strange, I have never been a forum participant before. Despite having had a couple of very active ones in which I rarely participated, at all.

But it's a great break from the monotonous task in front of me at the moment, and some of the posters here have interesting stories to tell of their own.

Nice to see things from a different view...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Exporting vehicle parts to Guadalajara several years ago a trip to Nogales to arrange transfer through customs was mandatory, definitely not my preference for a business trip. Naturally being ignorant and rather shortsighted regarding a city I had never been to I arrived envisioning a dirt town full of murderers and cheap mescal.

Actually I was pleasantly surprised. My 1st impression was a sense of vitality; people were active, engaged, and multicultural for the most part. Very robust business community, at least regarding the auto industry. My 2nd trip required an overnight stay which introduced me to the Marques De Cima Hotel. Not the Camino Real in GDL but a wonderful facility, I go months now without an overnight stay yet they remember me by name when I e-mail to reserve a room.

Delicious food. The La Roca Restaurant is undeniably exacting cuisine settled in a beautiful retired hotel dating back to the mid-1800s. The coffee shop across from the hotel serves up a hearty breakfast and lunch. Again, I am recognized, the young waitress refills my coffee cup without me having o ask. I like genuine people and this community features it.

Back in August I was in town for several days and invited familia from Sinaloa to join my wife and I. While my wife & sister-in-laws were shopping at the new mall my 11 year old niece and I went bowling (as a teenager in Chicago I never thought I would actually bowl in Nogales). Later we drove around the city to observe its cultural landscape; a very appealing suburban neighborhood, some incredibly beautiful expensive casas, an old meticulously manicured city park with children running around, and old historic train cars.

Where the heck is all the violence, refuse, and depredation so exposed by the media? ?? Suppose I’ll have to return again to look further. However, good tequila can be found.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Although most people assume otherwise, life in border towns can be quite enjoyable. I have been living very happily in Juarez for over 3 years now and would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

I understand that most members of this forum live further South, as it is ideal in many situations but I wish people would consider that some people have very good reasons for wanting/needing to live in a bordertown, so immediately discounting the idea it's always the best way to go.
Yes, although I am a semi-retired entertainment lawyer, I was to stay close to the music scene in Austin. Originally, I thought about Tijuana to be close to LA but that is just too far away from my home and family in Nashville so I settled on Nuevo Laredo.

I have never been to Juarez, but I do like El Paso.

:wave:
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top