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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I *think* I understand what this means, but would love some verification from somebody with more knowledge than I have. Obviously I am not meant to go on the dole or receive any sort of hand-out from the government. But I am less clear about if it applies to public services or not. My main two examples/questions:

1. As the dependent child of someone coming over on a spouse/settlement visa, is my daughter able to attend a state school? I have been assuming that she would be and already applied through the council and got her placement. Am I right about that? Or does she need to be in a public school and pay tuition to go to school in the UK?

2. How does this work with NHS and health care? I was assuming that we could see my husbands GP and he (my husband) is under the impression that we would be able to do so free of charge but I am not sure if that would be using public funds either... Will we need to pay for our health care during the time between arriving and applying for ILR?

These are two things I had just assumed I understood but am second guessing after reading some other posts and re-reading the "no recourse to public funds" information. Could somebody fill me in with the facts on this?

Much appreciation always,
Shelly
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Nyclon. That was what I thought but it all starts to get confusing after awhile. I just wanted a definitive yes or no from someone with more background knowledge than me.

Many thanks again,
Shelly
 

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No problems about enrolling at state (maintained) school.

About NHS care. Broadly yes, but when it comes to in-hospital care and operations, hospital trust is the arbiter and practice can vary. For those on a visa and is working (paid employment or self-employment), you have full cover but if you are on a time-limited visa (such as 27-month spouse visa) or FLR and neither you nor your spouse is currently working, you can be charged during the first 12 months.

See Are you taking up or resuming permanent residence in the UK? : Department of Health - Health care

As I said, some trusts are stricter than others (esp in London), so your experience may vary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ooohh, Joppa, that document confused me again.

Hopefully we will not be in need of any hospitalization anyway, but in the unlikely event... I will most likely not be working in the first year, but my husband definitely will be working. So are you saying that it is at the discretion of the hospital that we (hopefully will not ever) show up at?

We will be in Glossop, if that makes any sort of difference.

That page also mentions prescription medications. My understanding, in reading it, is that we would pay for prescriptions but it would be the same amount as anyone on the NHS paying for a prescription. Is that correct?

Sorry about all the questions and clarifications and thank you again,
Shelly
 

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Ooohh, Joppa, that document confused me again.

Hopefully we will not be in need of any hospitalization anyway, but in the unlikely event... I will most likely not be working in the first year, but my husband definitely will be working. So are you saying that it is at the discretion of the hospital that we (hopefully will not ever) show up at?
If you are a worker or a spouse/dependant of a worker, you should be covered from start.

We will be in Glossop, if that makes any sort of difference.
Your nearest general hospital will be in Stockport (Stepping Hill) and you come under Stockport NHS Foundation Trust.
NHS Foundation Trust | Every Patient Matters | Welcome

That page also mentions prescription medications. My understanding, in reading it, is that we would pay for prescriptions but it would be the same amount as anyone on the NHS paying for a prescription. Is that correct?
You just pay £7.65 per item. You can get an annual season ticket (pre-payment certificate) for £104 if you have more than 15 prescribed items a year.
 
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