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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was having lunch with a friend and colleague yesterday and wanted to use the French for "fun" but realised I didn't know it so asked him. Shockingly he admitted that there is no word for "fun" in French, so they use the English

Having checked, different versions of French have been spoken since the 5th Century, there are currently some 43,000 words and there have been about 15,000 meetings of the Academie Française

So how can it be that in over 2,000 years none of the Academie's "immortels" have thought of adding one more word for fun ? .... and what if anything does it say about the culture ?

Of course the words they do use also say something about the culture, what for example does the word "schadenfreude" say about the German culture ?

Best, Rick
 

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Another one for the egg-heads in here: "cosy"...

And v.v. "sympathique"
 

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hi Rick

Yes , I agree the word fun is difficult / impossible to translate. Another example, how do you say, for example "learning should be fun". The word "plaisir" does not give the same nuance?

I agree that it does say something about culture.

DejW
 

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Ah yes, I first discovered the lack of a word for "fun" when I started noticing how badly most French people misuse the English word "funny." (Typical example: "Oh we had a funny time last weekend.")

Similarly, there is no noun form of the word "ride" - as in "can I give you a ride to the store?" or "I have to go when Suzy does. She's my ride." In fact, I can't even say that I ride my donkey, but rather that I go mounted on him. (Which sounds a little kinky to me...)

Besides, what do you expect when the word "jamais" means both "ever" and "never"?
Cheers,
Bev
 

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...

Similarly, there is no noun form of the word "ride" - as in "can I give you a ride to the store?" or "I have to go when Suzy does. She's my ride." In fact, I can't even say that I ride my donkey, but rather that I go mounted on him. (Which sounds a little kinky to me...)
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Bev
In English (UK) we would raise eyebrows at "ride" used as a noun like that as well (similar to your "mounted on"); we would say "lift". But we do "ride" our 4-legged friends (amongst other things) as a verb.

lol

NB what d'you do on a bicycle? :D
 

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Besides, what do you expect when the word "jamais" means both "ever" and "never"?
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Bev
- or, indeed, when a "coup de main" means being helpful, but a "coup de pied" is something you wouldn't want? .... or when "plus" means either "more" or "no more"? (Incorrect grammatically because in the negative sense, both "jamais" and "plus" should have a "ne" preceding them somewhere, but it's not what people say .....)

h aaaaaaaaargh lol
 

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I am not prepared to discuss whatever "I do " on a bicycle.

DejW


In English (UK) we would raise eyebrows at "ride" used as a noun like that as well (similar to your "mounted on"); we would say "lift". But we do "ride" our 4-legged friends (amongst other things) as a verb.

lol

NB what d'you do on a bicycle? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Didn't take long to get from "fun" to "kinky" did it ? .... actually I looked up "kinky" in the translation site I use (well it's raining and there's nothing on the TV !) and there are many different options in French depending on the context

R
 

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Not pointing the finger but I think it's clear who's responsible for that ..... !!!!!!!!!! :D
 
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