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The Argentinian economy is on the rocks...hence populist gestures of this kind which are in reality like shooting yourself in the foot. I notice La Presidente was carefully posed against a portrait of Eva Peron....

This and the renewed fuss over the Falklands.

I feel about the Falklands as I do about Gibraltar....both God-forsaken dots on the map whose inhabitants wish to remain British.

So they should be allowed to. End of story.
 

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I beg to differ. First of all, I was under the impresion that the Argentinian economy was doing quite well, but havent checked lately.

I for one totally respect a president that puts the interests of its people first, instead of those of banks and inverstors. The argentinians didn't have enough petrol to cover their growing needs, despite of having the natural resources to do so, and this is because of mismanagment and greed of Repsol spanish buffons.
Yes a contract has been broken, but the deal was done during deperate times for Argentina, and the spanish, as usual, took advantage. What starts badly, badly ends, as we say in Spain (and probably in Argentina too).

What is found in Argentinian soil, should be used to the best interest of their own people. As for the Facklands, I agree, their inhabitant should remain british if they wish to do so, but what it is found in Argentinian soil and water, should belong to them.
 

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The royal elephant killer story was on the BBC news yesterday. And some twit from the OECD was quoted saying Spain was only good for wine and flamenco.

Better to be talked about than not talked about, I suppose.
 

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The royal elephant killer story was on the BBC news yesterday. And some twit from the OECD was quoted saying Spain was only good for wine and flamenco.

Better to be talked about than not talked about, I suppose.
...I know, I 've lost all sense of national pride. OUr royals are shooting precious wildlife, Flamenco gets on my nerves, and I secretly admit that I'd rather have californian wine...But HEy, at least we are still the football world champions, right? Althought the french think that they were doped .

oh well...
 

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...I know, I 've lost all sense of national pride. OUr royals are shooting precious wildlife, Flamenco gets on my nerves, and I secretly admit that I'd rather have californian wine...But HEy, at least we are still the football world champions, right? Althought the french think that they were doped .

oh well...

I love your attitude lol!!!

Jo xxx
 

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Just love all those over the top adjectives
Spain’s under fire PM Mariano Rajoy admitted the country would not be able to fund itself unless it slashed spending. Even Spain’s King Juan Carlos was dragged into the crisis. He was slammed by Spanish media for flying to Botswana to hunt elephants.
But an article a week is all I can take from The Sun :)
 

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The royal elephant killer story was on the BBC news yesterday. And some twit from the OECD was quoted saying Spain was only good for wine and flamenco.

Better to be talked about than not talked about, I suppose.
Is the WWF doing anything about kicking JC out?
 

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I beg to differ. First of all, I was under the impresion that the Argentinian economy was doing quite well, but havent checked lately.

I for one totally respect a president that puts the interests of its people first, instead of those of banks and inverstors. The argentinians didn't have enough petrol to cover their growing needs, despite of having the natural resources to do so, and this is because of mismanagment and greed of Repsol spanish buffons.
Yes a contract has been broken, but the deal was done during deperate times for Argentina, and the spanish, as usual, took advantage. What starts badly, badly ends, as we say in Spain (and probably in Argentina too).

What is found in Argentinian soil, should be used to the best interest of their own people. As for the Facklands, I agree, their inhabitant should remain british if they wish to do so, but what it is found in Argentinian soil and water, should belong to them.
I see where you are coming from ...but if you extended that principle the Spanish Government would be entitled to nationalise Carrefour and the UK Government should nationalise Zara as well as the vast foreign-owned petroleum corporations.:)
Are you sure that Kirchner's actions have benefitted the country rather than being a shallow populist gesture -like the Falklands sabre-rattling - to distract attention from a mismanaged economy with rising inflation? The seizure of corporate assets-which is what it is- is in contravention of both law and practicality in that it is likely to lead to extreme reluctance on the part of foreign investors to pump much-needed money into the Argentine economy.

I'm afraid that the idea that a national leader who ignores the interests of banks and investors is acting in the national interest just doesn't square with the world as it is. Any modern nation state that cares for the interests of its people will be very careful about the way it treats banks and investors, especially one like Argentina the economy of which, as with so many South American states, has been deformed by decades of misdguided and mismanaged collectivism.

It's a romantic notion, the heroic leader defying the evil predatory capitalists, I agree. But notions and reality sadly rarely coincide and we are back to the tired old cliche of seeing the world as it is...

And could the fact that Argentina has failed to develop its natural resources to the benefit of its people also lie at least in part with the mismanagement and corruption of past and not so past Argentinian politicians?
 

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Argentine inflationis running at 23+% !

The problem is the speculators. They've got bored elsewhere& have turned their attention to Spain , once again !
The Spanish have done all that has been asked of them by Implementing swinging austerity cuts. It's extremely difficult to have growth when asked to implement austerity !
They have increased exports & reduced imports & now have a net income.Inflation is low, lower than the Uk. Yes there's the highest unemployment in the EU but that's what austerity brings. The ten year bond interest rate is being forced up, by the lenders & speculators, but as one economist pointed out at the weekend ; Why would you invest in German ten year bonds at 1,75% when any sane person can work out that over this period german wage rises & inflation will leave you with less than your original investment ? Another professor from the Madrid institute pointed out on Bloomberg yesterday that the Spanish have accepted the cuts , done everything asked of them & are still getting a kicking ! Why ? + their fierce pride will not allow them to seek help( even if it was necessary) or ask for a bailout!
This is something that is giving me extreme cause for concern at the moment which it shouldn't be.
If you allow speculators ( Gamblers in essence ) to run the markets I've always said that it's a recipe for disaster.
The EC Bank won't lend to eu countries at low rates but will lend to any eu bank at 1% ! So you've got banks borrowing at 1% & buying government bonds at 6% !!!!!!!!!!! It's just encouraging the speculators to put pressure on to up the bond rates.
When they talk of 'bailouts' it's worth bearing in mind that Cataluña alone has a gdp equivalent to that of Austria ! It's never going to happen.
 

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Argentine inflationis running at 23+% !

The problem is the speculators. They've got bored elsewhere& have turned their attention to Spain , once again !
The Spanish have done all that has been asked of them by Implementing swinging austerity cuts. It's extremely difficult to have growth when asked to implement austerity !
They have increased exports & reduced imports & now have a net income.Inflation is low, lower than the Uk. Yes there's the highest unemployment in the EU but that's what austerity brings. The ten year bond interest rate is being forced up, by the lenders & speculators, but as one economist pointed out at the weekend ; Why would you invest in German ten year bonds at 1,75% when any sane person can work out that over this period german wage rises & inflation will leave you with less than your original investment ? Another professor from the Madrid institute pointed out on Bloomberg yesterday that the Spanish have accepted the cuts , done everything asked of them & are still getting a kicking ! Why ? + their fierce pride will not allow them to seek help( even if it was necessary) or ask for a bailout!
This is something that is giving me extreme cause for concern at the moment which it shouldn't be.
If you allow speculators ( Gamblers in essence ) to run the markets I've always said that it's a recipe for disaster.
The EC Bank won't lend to eu countries at low rates but will lend to any eu bank at 1% ! So you've got banks borrowing at 1% & buying government bonds at 6% !!!!!!!!!!! It's just encouraging the speculators to put pressure on to up the bond rates.
When they talk of 'bailouts' it's worth bearing in mind that Cataluña alone has a gdp equivalent to that of Austria ! It's never going to happen.

All true....but it was electorates all over Europe, Australia, New Zealand and the U.S. who allowed this to happen by voting in Governments that followed slavishly the free market 'greed is good' philosophy.
Tory or New Labour, Republican or Democrat...all followed the deregulate,privatise, free trade, free movement of capital and people neo-liberal agenda.
The rich got richer by creaming off the profits of corporate enterprise, the less well-off gorged on ultimately unaffordable credit to fund a lifestyle they could previously only aspire to.
A sense of entitlement isn't the sole property of those on welfare....far too many people fail to understand that there is no law that says you should have a bigger house, a newer car, your 'dream' home in Spain.
Blaming Governments, especially the comparatively prudent Spanish Government of Zapatero, for all the current ills is shifting responsibility from those voters that put them there, surely...
And yes, the markets determine economic policies and outcomes, not national governments.
But how, realistically, at this time to change this dreadful state of affairs?
The deficit must be reduced, debt repaid and a new approach instigated.
There is no other way.
 

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Here's another cheery little article about Brits trapped in Spain, and the effect of the mass exodus on a local community (Villanueva del Trabuco).

'Any expats who could move back to the UK already have. The rest of us are trapped' - Europe - World - The Independent

I'm a little puzzled why it cites the fall of the euro as a reason for them wanting to leave. A fall in the euro means their pensions go further, surely?
Yes that article is quite mixed up. The headline says

As house prices tumble, and the euro falls just as fast, a dark shadow has been cast over the Britons who retired to the sun
It's just wrong.
 

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Here's another cheery little article about Brits trapped in Spain, and the effect of the mass exodus on a local community (Villanueva del Trabuco).

'Any expats who could move back to the UK already have. The rest of us are trapped' - Europe - World - The Independent

I'm a little puzzled why it cites the fall of the euro as a reason for them wanting to leave. A fall in the euro means their pensions go further, surely?

I guess the rise in prices has overtaken the fall in the euro/£ rate.
But some of these people have only themselves to blame. Taking on mortgages one really can't afford is a recipe for disaster whether in S****horpe or Salou.
Again, retiring to Spain was viewed as part of the 'never had it so good' consumer package of the 1980s. People uppede sticks and left the UK on a shoestring.
When we contemplated moving to Spain in the summer of 2008, we had already experienced a drop of almost 30% in income as a result of the CKZ/£ exchange rate. The £ at that time would buy 1.22 euros, as now. I did our calculations on the basis of 1:1 parity, never thinking we'd need that margin of 'safety'.
When we arrived in December 2008 the £ was getting us....1 euro!!
 

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Here's another cheery little article about Brits trapped in Spain, and the effect of the mass exodus on a local community (Villanueva del Trabuco).

'Any expats who could move back to the UK already have. The rest of us are trapped' - Europe - World - The Independent

I'm a little puzzled why it cites the fall of the euro as a reason for them wanting to leave. A fall in the euro means their pensions go further, surely?
It's just nonsense . The final paragraph about putting the keys through the letter box says a lot for the quality ! In reality None of them would have a mortgage .

This says it all !! " But, he adds gloomily, corned beef prices in his local Iceland have gone through the roof." :rofl:
 

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It's just nonsense . The final paragraph about putting the keys through the letter box says a lot for the quality ! In reality None of them would have a mortgage .

This says it all !! " But, he adds gloomily, corned beef prices in his local Iceland have gone through the roof." :rofl:
Hahaha
That has be a candidate for Quote of the Year! With that kind of attitude he wasn't going to last his retirement out anyway, was he?
:bounce:Thanks for pointing that out Gus:bounce:
 
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