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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone:
I am beginning to plan retiring full time Mexico sometime from 18 to 24 months from now (8-2-2017). I have been googling my brains out reading all I can about places that interest me in Mexico and this forum has been helpful.

#1 on my list is the Lake Chapala area. I don't require much, just a clean quiet space, a patio with a view, comfortable chair and a good book. Maybe some cleaning and or cooking help twice a week if affordable. I would like to eat out 5 or 6 times a month and cook at home the rest. Do you thik it possible for me to find such a place and services and live comfortably on $2200 per month?

Thanks for your consideration, I plan to be an active member in this forum.
GrayGeek::cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply Chicois, I have a very close relative planning on touring Lake Chapala in the next 6 months or so. I will depend on her opinion. She and her husband will be moving to Mexico also but thy plan to buy a house. If I can jugle my current work obligations, it's possible that I will join them on thier tour. I am trying to save every dollar I can for expenses.
 

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Being active in finding information is a good start.
Are you by yourself on that $2200 a month income? if so, you can manage just fine. In fact, 2 people can manage on that.

Pay no attention to the implied negative when you hear the lake Chapala area called "Gringolandia". Yes, there are a lot of expats from the U.S. and Canada living here. So? That means you have a large group of people from which to choose your new friends, si?
Since there are so many, it also means you will find many interest groups, from golfers to bridge players, artists and just about anything else you can think of.

There are people who prefer to find a thoroughly Mexican environment in a small town far from other expats. That's another choice.

Nothing wrong with going either way. I do agree you should try whatever you choose on a 180 day tourist visa first. "Boots on the ground" is a good start.

Welcome and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Lagoloo !
Yes it will be only me. My cousin (she knows me well and her opinion I trust completely)so wherever I end up she will be some where near with her husband. I do look forward to meeting and socializing with other expats in the area. I play a little guitar so meeting other musicians would be fun.
GG
 

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With 2200 bucks per month, you can live well almost anywhere in Mexico. Well at least the places I know--without TOO many gringos. We live in the mountains of Ver. on much less than that, with a servant-gardener about 4 days per week at salary of 15 bucks per day. Great climate, cheap expenses--especially MEDICAL and DENTAL...nobody I know even has insurance, it is so cheap here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tell me more a medical expenses please ?
I take a few prescriptions that will probably follow me to the grave so getting renewals and cost of prescription drugs is a concern.

And thanks to the previous reply Frankania.
 

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Best pharmacy is Dr Simi, with stores everywhere in Mexico. 2nd is Farmacia Guadalajara--also everywhere. Most drugs do NOT need prescriptions, so bring the papers along to see. If they do need prescription, then go to a private doctor $2 per visit in most clinics, and GET the prescription there. I have FREE govt healthcare (IMSS) since I was a teacher here, but private docs are so cheap, that I usually use them for faster service & second opinions.....
 

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There is also Seguro Popular, available to all residents including expats. This covers all medical needs including prescription drugs, but private out of pocket care in very inexpensive compared to the U.S.
 

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I think it is a good idea to carry some kind of medical evacuation insurance, and that would be a new expense for your budget. Some choose to plan to die here one way or another.

I was on a prescription drug that affected Triglyceride levels and cholesterol in one medication. It is unavailable here and the doctors are not familiar with it, but can prescribe two drugs to accomplish the same things, so you need to be prepared to be a little flexible. I've read that very few doctors are authorized to prescribe opiates, so some things may be a problem to continue getting.
 

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I think it is a good idea to carry some kind of medical evacuation insurance, and that would be a new expense for your budget. Some choose to plan to die here one way or another.

I was on a prescription drug that affected Triglyceride levels and cholesterol in one medication. It is unavailable here and the doctors are not familiar with it, but can prescribe two drugs to accomplish the same things, so you need to be prepared to be a little flexible. I've read that very few doctors are authorized to prescribe opiates, so some things may be a problem to continue getting.
I am a permanent resident of Mexico and may become a citizen one day (once I have the patience to deal with the red tape required) and will die here, no doubt. Why would I need medical evacuation insurance if medical care here is certainly equal to that found in the States and available at a reasonable cost?
 

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Best pharmacy is Dr Simi, with stores everywhere in Mexico. 2nd is Farmacia Guadalajara--also everywhere. Most drugs do NOT need prescriptions, so bring the papers along to see. If they do need prescription, then go to a private doctor $2 per visit in most clinics, and GET the prescription there. I have FREE govt healthcare (IMSS) since I was a teacher here, but private docs are so cheap, that I usually use them for faster service & second opinions.....
Dr. Simi (Farmacias de Similares) carries generic medicine that may or may not have the same effects as quality-controlled generics and brand-name drugs. I've never seen Farmacia Guadalajara in Mexico City. I buy mine at my local Superama pharmacy - the prices are quite competitive, and they usually have what I need.

You do need prescriptions for antibiotics and "psicotrópicos".

I don't have health insurance at the moment but have had no problem being able to pay my medical bills, including gall bladder surgery last year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Gracias for the replies:

I will be 69 when I reach Mexico. The only precondition I have is Diabetes 2. My A1C is currently about 6. I am making a concentrated effort to lose weight, exercise and eat right. I hope to be below 5.7 A1C well before retiring. So I should not need metformin once I reach my goals. I'll have to keep an eye on my mexican diet to keep my weight under control. All of that said does anyone have an Idea what current Seguro Popular premiums are for a fairly healthy 69 year old male?
 

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There are a lot of things that are different between medical care in the US and Mexico. Sure - it is possible to get by, live, and spend less money than you would spend in the US - but it is almost like comparing apples and oranges. If you are healthy - then it really doesn't matter. We have IMSS and are happy with it. But - my wife, who is very healthy gets 2 visits with our GP/year. IF she were to need to see a doctor in the mean time - that would most likely be outside of IMSS - unless we were to visit the emergency room - which I don't think we would do.

IMSS is seriously trying to address high BP and diabetes. I have high BP. I HAVE TO see my GP once every month. Twice a year I have lab work done. Last time the IMSS lab said I was 'pre-diabetic'. I went to an outside lab (very nice facility) and they said 'no'. Whatever drugs I pick up at the IMSS pharmacy are available at any pharmacy without a prescription. At the same time - the cost of those drugs would almost be equal to the annual cost of the IMSS insurance. Controlled drugs can be rather expensive in Mexico - both for the drug itself and for the doctor who would write the prescription.

I'm only saying all this to point out that medical care in Mexico - while probaby cheaper - is not free - and is not quite the same thing as in the US.
 

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I'm only saying all this to point out that medical care in Mexico - while probaby cheaper - is not free - and is not quite the same thing as in the US.
Has anyone on this thread implied that medical care in Mexico is free? What is not the same thing as in the US, medical care or medical insurance?
 

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Dr. Simi (Farmacias de Similares) carries generic medicine that may or may not have the same effects as quality-controlled generics and brand-name drugs. I've never seen Farmacia Guadalajara in Mexico City. I buy mine at my local Superama pharmacy - ...
Many years ago I needed Salbutamol because I ran out. I bought an aerosol spray labeled Salbutamol at Similares - their brand name for $20.00 pesos. I used it for a couple of days without getting any relief and then read my regular spray container [inhaler] I took out of my trash container and it was 200 doses and had X micrograms and costs $70.00 pesos at the time. The Similares was labeled 100 doses and contained 1/20 th. of the micrograms of active ingredients of my regular brand. In other words instead of 2 sprays per dose I would need 40 to equal my regular spray. That was the last time I shopped at Similares for medicnes. Some people had warned me of Similares doing these tricks.
 

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There are differences between IMSS and Seguro Popular: IMSS charges a flat fee based on your age.
SP bases the fees on "means testing" but is pretty generous in their assessments. Often free. The biggest difference is that those with "pre existing conditions" are not covered for those conditions under IMSS, or there is a waiting period. This could be a problem for a diabetic. Seguro Popular will cover them.

"medivac" coverage is for those who have faith that they will receive better care in the U.S. and will be able to use their Medicare coverage. For them, they are advised to continue paying for Part B every month since there is a heavy penalty to sign up again if you drop it. Be aware that Medicare will not pay for treatment in Mexico except for certain emergencies when people are not permanent residents. All this information can be found with the help of Senor Google.

Personally, I don't exactly trust the "Similares" drugs and one poster did a good job of explaining why.
 
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