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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I was just wondering if one of the experts would give us a better understanding of what these new rules mean? Will my husband who's recently received his spouse visa be subject to this charge? And when?

Many thanks!
KHP
 

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Nothing has been decided yet - just government proposals. I think they are talking about a levy of £200 a year until ILR?
 
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Which is very cheap considering what you could get for that fee. A student in Australia, the USA etc would be expected to have extensive medical insurance with no access to any public services on offer.

Far as i saw its students and temp entrants with visas between 6 months and 1 year long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Which is very cheap considering what you could get for that fee. A student in Australia, the USA etc would be expected to have extensive medical insurance with no access to any public services on offer.

Far as i saw its students and temp entrants with visas between 6 months and 1 year long.
OK thanks. Though to be fair the history of NHS is very different to the US system and is not a comparable entity in my opinion. My fear is that with these types of changes is that they are a kind of salami slicing of the system. They start with charges for immigrants because it's popular with a large section of the public but then it will continue to everyone else once the system of payment is in place.

There is obviously a problem with the rising costs of the service but instead of increasing national insurance contributions, which would be fairer and more practical they are choosing to make changes that will garner votes in the run up to the next election.

Thanks,
KHP
 

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Which is very cheap considering what you could get for that fee. A student in Australia, the USA etc would be expected to have extensive medical insurance with no access to any public services on offer.

Far as i saw its students and temp entrants with visas between 6 months and 1 year long.
From reading the new immigration law, I think it applies to all those with leave to enter until such time as they receive ILR. I think the levy idea is a very good one. The present amount is rather low but we will see what they decide on.
 

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I think it would be good as well. It seems like the fairest way to determine who will pay depends on if you are paying into the system with your taxes with the exception of those residents who are on benefits. I keep hearing people calling healthcare I the uk "free". I don't consider it 'free' but 'prepaid'. I have no idea how much of my husbands income goes towards healthcare through taxes but I would imagine it is a fair amount. Even so I would have no problem with paying a certain amount in the first year or two in order to use the system since we will have not contributed that much yet. Seems fair to me.
 

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We came in with the understanding we would have private insurance coverage. Of course once we got here and got our policy information we realised it does not cover gp visits, medications or emergency. We use NHS for that and the private insurance kicks in for specialists. I was not really happy about that but it was too late to back out of the move at that point or renegotiate the contract. The first time I have to wait for hours at emergency I might regret it. ;)
 

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I would be interested in hearing people's thoughts on migrants working full-time in the UK yet do not have ILR. I wouldn't oppose the charge, but seems a little tough to me when we're paying in via our salaries every month...
 

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We came in with the understanding we would have private insurance coverage. Of course once we got here and got our policy information we realised it does not cover gp visits, medications or emergency. We use NHS for that and the private insurance kicks in for specialists. I was not really happy about that but it was too late to back out of the move at that point or renegotiate the contract. The first time I have to wait for hours at emergency I might regret it. ;)
I'll have to review my policy but I think it covers A&E and things at the GP that are not NHS funded screening programmes (what we call Pap smears in the US, bowel, etc). The dental part of my insurance covers a lot too. My husband did all the legwork re finding a comprehensive policy before we married - apparently the search can be a bit frustrating.

So far as a long wait at A&E, thank God I've not had to test that. Private or NHS, I think they take you at A&E in turn depending on seriousness, though.

@Marie1715, yes, paying in now, but hadn't paid in before arriving and finding work; costs may exceed the pay-in for the first few years so I do think the fee is reasonable for anyone not on ILR or naturalised.

Jmho, though, and again, it's 'easy' for me to say that because even though I have the ILR now I'm still carrying private insurance. I'd love to get the coverage I've got for £200pa rather than the monthly premium I'm paying now, for example.
 

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We came in with the understanding we would have private insurance coverage. . ;)
Was private medical insurance part of the "deal" for you to get your visa approved? I think the proposal is that non EU spouses would either have private medical insurance or pay the levy. I did not know that they were already requiring private medical insurance.
 

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I came over on a Fiancée visa and had no extra medical insurance, other than the tail end of an annual trip insurance policy that I'd taken out the previous year (I was mortgaged to the hilt, as it were, with out of province medical cover as I often took spur of the moment day trips to the USA and didn't want to be caught without).

I fully expected to have my basic medical needs covered by the NHS according to the provisions that they (NHS) set out with regards to people who are in my visa situation and whatever coverage that I wasn't entitled to, we were/are prepared to pay for privately. I was/am fortunate that I haven't been so terribly ill that I've needed hospitalisation (just a couple of visits to establish a continuance of some meds I was on in Canada), so I've lucked out there. We do have excess cover through Beneden health, but have yet to use it.

If I had to pay an annual £200 levy for care every year as a non-UK citizen on FLR until I got ILR, I wouldn't complain too much, as that's way less than what I was paying per year when I lived in British Columbia (CAD 780$/GBP £465 per year, NOT including any dental cover or prescription costs of >CAD 10$/GBP £6 dispensing fee plus medicine cost per item).

That said, I'm hoping that the proposals don't come into effect until next Fall and that if I have to pay, they'll pro-rate my levy as I'm eligible for ILR in 50 weeks time.
 
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