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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,


This is my first post. I have a very specialized circumstance that seems to be impeding my progress to finalize this Visa. Mind you, I have already passed the TRA assessment and sponsored by WA. I will be finally lodging with the DIAC in the coming week and before the upcoming changes on July 1st.


Here is my dilemma:

My migration agent is asking me for 12 months evidence of "full time" employment. I work as a Union Boilermaker in the industrial field. I primarily work on Industrial sized boilers, steam generating turbines, etc. My work, for the last 9 years as a Boilermaker, has always been seasonal in essence. Ive always made a decent living for myself and frictional unemployment is just a natural fact of my career. My work fluctuates and is dictated by by a number of variables (ie: energy legislation, energy demands, contract bids,etc)
So, I have intermittent pay slips over the course of 12 months, with periods of unemployment...(totaling over 75k). This may be a problem for me, but I find it hard to believe that the DIAC has not encountered a scenario similar to this. My agent keeps asking me to get my union hall to write a letter stating that Ive been a full time employee of the union...this is not a possibility. My union hall does not employ me, they represent and dispatch me to any given job that may arise. I DO NOT want to forward 2500$ to lodge a 176 Visa if its only to be shot down...is it impossible to think outside of the box? Has anyone encountered serious implications from a career that is tuned a tad different from the norm and is considered "seasonal"?

Any advice on this matter would be tremendously appreciated. I can not believe the amount of road blocks I have broke through trying to obtain this visa.


Charles
 
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Seasonal work wont get you a visa. You need full time (more than 20hrs a week in DIACs eyes) paid employment over 12 months in the last 24.

It's not about thinking outside the box. It's Australian Migration Law and no Case Officer or agent can bend it for you.
 

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I just looked back at the evidence I provided back in 2009 and my visa was approved with me only providing 3 payslips from the same employer. One of these was dated March so it showed my year to date earnings for the previous tax year, but I don't remember being asked to provide anything else.
The verification procedures may have changed in the last couple of years but if they haven't then casual work may slip through the net if you're lucky and you've earned enough.
 

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Greetings,


This is my first post. I have a very specialized circumstance that seems to be impeding my progress to finalize this Visa. Mind you, I have already passed the TRA assessment and sponsored by WA. I will be finally lodging with the DIAC in the coming week and before the upcoming changes on July 1st.


Here is my dilemma:

My migration agent is asking me for 12 months evidence of "full time" employment. I work as a Union Boilermaker in the industrial field. I primarily work on Industrial sized boilers, steam generating turbines, etc. My work, for the last 9 years as a Boilermaker, has always been seasonal in essence. Ive always made a decent living for myself and frictional unemployment is just a natural fact of my career. My work fluctuates and is dictated by by a number of variables (ie: energy legislation, energy demands, contract bids,etc)
So, I have intermittent pay slips over the course of 12 months, with periods of unemployment...(totaling over 75k). This may be a problem for me, but I find it hard to believe that the DIAC has not encountered a scenario similar to this. My agent keeps asking me to get my union hall to write a letter stating that Ive been a full time employee of the union...this is not a possibility. My union hall does not employ me, they represent and dispatch me to any given job that may arise. I DO NOT want to forward 2500$ to lodge a 176 Visa if its only to be shot down...is it impossible to think outside of the box? Has anyone encountered serious implications from a career that is tuned a tad different from the norm and is considered "seasonal"?

Any advice on this matter would be tremendously appreciated. I can not believe the amount of road blocks I have broke through trying to obtain this visa.


Charles
my advice is that u either convince union to give letter of employment otherwise ur case will be complicated
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just looked back at the evidence I provided back in 2009 and my visa was approved with me only providing 3 payslips from the same employer. One of these was dated March so it showed my year to date earnings for the previous tax year, but I don't remember being asked to provide anything else.
The verification procedures may have changed in the last couple of years but if they haven't then casual work may slip through the net if you're lucky and you've earned enough.


The only problem is:

They will most likely want payslips up to the date of lodging of the visa, in which case I am unemployed at the moment. As a union, industrial tuned boilermaker, it is very typical not to have work in the summer and winter months. I appreciate your response, hopefully there will be a way around this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Seasonal work wont get you a visa. You need full time (more than 20hrs a week in DIACs eyes) paid employment over 12 months in the last 24.

It's not about thinking outside the box. It's Australian Migration Law and no Case Officer or agent can bend it for you.


I understand, but I wasn't the one who put Boilermaker on the MODL list to begin with. This was my initial interest in Australian migration. It was to my understanding that a majority of Boilermakers are essentially seasonal craftsmen. I work an average of 2100 (that's well over 20 hours per week) per year...just not spread out over twelve months, I complete my hours in half the time, which means I typically work rigorous, 60-90 hours a week for two-three months straight, then a some time off, then another two/three months straight. I'm not asking anyone to "BEND" the rules for me, I don't appreciate the tone of your message, although I value the information.


Charles
 
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So couldnt you call it extended shift work? I know self employed people do this when applying if their work is seasonal by showing tax returns etc.

Or if you cant provide the evidence right now then look at the 457 if you can find a sponsor. You could then look at PR on the basis of employment with them later. Or does the 475 provisional have the same recent work experience requirements?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So couldnt you call it extended shift work? I know self employed people do this when applying if their work is seasonal by showing tax returns etc.

Or if you cant provide the evidence right now then look at the 457 if you can find a sponsor. You could then look at PR on the basis of employment with them later. Or does the 475 provisional have the same recent work experience requirements?


I will have to discuss this with my migration agent, I have an incredible amount of time restraints at the moment though. My agent wants to lodge the visa on the 23rd, then obtain all pertinent documentation before July 1st, as the laws are supposed to change again.

The only course of action I can take is writing a letter explaining the very nature and inner workings of The International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, the union membership I'm apart of. I spoke with my union representatives yesterday, they said I cannot use the term "employee" in my letter, but as long as its not too far out of bounds, they will slap a signature on it. Like I have stated before, I pay union dues to have them represent me, and they dispatch me to work, but in essence, I am not on their specific payroll.

I work for a slew of contractors during the year....I counted 12 separate tax forms from 12 different employers last year, all totaling a grand total of 70 thousand for the 2010 tax year, and 13 thousand from unemployment benefits....so total, approximately 82 thousand.

This has been a personal dream of mine, my agent told me that the TRA assessment and state sponsorship were the hardest parts of the migration process......I hope this roadblock wont shoot me down.

I will ask my agent on Monday, again, thanks for the information/insights.


Charles
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As of March 13th 2012, I have secured a 176 permanent residency visa. This is for all you union welders out there, it's a long road trying to prove your man hours and training, but it's possible.

Kind Regards,

Rootweave
 

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would you be able to get a letter which says that you have been working for atleast 20 hours/ week .....

......For the purpose of awarding points, the department considers skilled employment in the nominated occupation or a closely related occupation will comprise at least 20 hours employment per week......
http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/general-skilled-migration/pdf/points-test.pdf

How many continuous pay-slips can you provide ?
I guess the most recent 5-6 are more than enough...
I provided the most recent 3 payslips and it turned out to be just fine..

Greetings,


This is my first post. I have a very specialized circumstance that seems to be impeding my progress to finalize this Visa. Mind you, I have already passed the TRA assessment and sponsored by WA. I will be finally lodging with the DIAC in the coming week and before the upcoming changes on July 1st.


Here is my dilemma:

My migration agent is asking me for 12 months evidence of "full time" employment. I work as a Union Boilermaker in the industrial field. I primarily work on Industrial sized boilers, steam generating turbines, etc. My work, for the last 9 years as a Boilermaker, has always been seasonal in essence. Ive always made a decent living for myself and frictional unemployment is just a natural fact of my career. My work fluctuates and is dictated by by a number of variables (ie: energy legislation, energy demands, contract bids,etc)
So, I have intermittent pay slips over the course of 12 months, with periods of unemployment...(totaling over 75k). This may be a problem for me, but I find it hard to believe that the DIAC has not encountered a scenario similar to this. My agent keeps asking me to get my union hall to write a letter stating that Ive been a full time employee of the union...this is not a possibility. My union hall does not employ me, they represent and dispatch me to any given job that may arise. I DO NOT want to forward 2500$ to lodge a 176 Visa if its only to be shot down...is it impossible to think outside of the box? Has anyone encountered serious implications from a career that is tuned a tad different from the norm and is considered "seasonal"?

Any advice on this matter would be tremendously appreciated. I can not believe the amount of road blocks I have broke through trying to obtain this visa.


Charles
 

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Congratulations !!!!!

As of March 13th 2012, I have secured a 176 permanent residency visa. This is for all you union welders out there, it's a long road trying to prove your man hours and training, but it's possible.

Kind Regards,

Rootweave
 
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