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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I currently work for a multi national in the UK. Over the last couple of years i have mainly been working overseas, mainly in the US. I have a Blanket L1 visa and have recently been asked to transfer from the UK company books to the US books.

This is all fine by me i just have a few concerns:

1) For the first few months after transferring i will be working in the US but living in the UK. I have been told that i will need to get a US Social security number for tax purposes along with a US bank account. Is this possible without a US address. Can anyone tell me how my taxes will work in the UK as ill still be a resident there, but ill be getting paid by a US company?

2) My boss wants me to move to Denver, CO eventually. I have a girlfriend of nearly 8 years (i know i should have married her by now!!) Will i have to get a separate visa for her? If so which one?

Any help would be great,

Thanks
 

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You don't necessarily need a US address to get a social security number and card, however, when you become "resident" in the US is more a matter of your visa than where you are physically set up for those first few months.

If you need to get your social security number before your arrival in the US, you can contact the Social Security office at the London consulate for information: Federal Benefits / Social Security | Embassy of the United States

Opening a bank account will be a bit trickier, as banks around the world are required to "know your customer" and most require some form of face to face contact in order to open an account. Contrary to popular belief, however, a social security number is not a legal requirement for opening an account. It may be easiest to simply set up a bank account the next time you're over in the US and change your address when you get established in more permanent quarters.

When you are working in the US, you will pay taxes to the US. You should file a document with the UK tax authority to tell them you are "non-resident" in the UK so that you will be off the hook for UK taxes. There is a tax treaty between the US and UK that generally keeps you from being double taxed, but you have to be sure to follow the proper procedures to keep matters straight.

As for the girlfriend, yes, you either have to marry her (and get her a dependent visa) or she has to get her own visa. The US doesn't recognize de facto relationships for immigration purposes.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for that info Bev,

Another question for you: before i get moved over to the US i will be working over here and getting paid in to a US Bank account but i will still be living in the UK. What is the easiest and cheapest way of getting my money to the UK? Thanks
 

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Your L1 visa is still valid? Or are you at the end of the 6 (or 7) years?
Inform yourself so you know how long it will take to get your wife in the US. I know it's easy when you are married before you apply for your visa. I don't know how it works when you already have the visa, before you get married.
 

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Thanks for that info Bev,

Another question for you: before i get moved over to the US i will be working over here and getting paid in to a US Bank account but i will still be living in the UK. What is the easiest and cheapest way of getting my money to the UK? Thanks
Depends how much of the money you need or want to transfer at a time. If you're headed to the US to live eventually, chances are you don't want to transfer it all. But other folks here have more experience with transferring money between the US and UK than I do. Direct bank transfer are generally the easiest, but going through an FX company can get you a better rate of exchange, and often a better transfer price.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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The very cheapest way is to use a U.S. credit card with a generous cash rebate and no added foreign transaction fee to make as many purchases in the U.K. And to pay off the full balance of that credit card every month, preferably via automatic payment so you don't forget.

Capital One's Quicksilver credit card is among the best examples of that type of credit card, but there are some other examples.

Cash drawn from ATMs in the U.K. using a U.S. ATM/debit card with zero foreign transaction fee and zero ATM fees is another fairly inexpensive way to move money, assuming the ATM in the U.K. does not impose a local fee. (Many do not.)
 
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