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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!

I'm new here so let me just introduce myself! I moved to France about 6years ago to be with my boyfriend (who is French). We lived in Paris up until a year ago when we decided to move south for a bit more of a peaceful life!

I have a few questions that are quite embarassing/stupid (please don't be too hard on me for being so naive)!

Health Insurance:
Up until this date, I've gone no further then to have a provisional French Health Insurance Number. I know, it's not very smart of me to have gone no further... It was a nightmare in Paris to try and get through all the bureaucratic malarky and I honestly just gave up in the end because every time I went there was something not right or something the last person didn't tell me I needed and thus I didn't have. I've even had to denounced my rights to the NHS in the process of all that, so I really am in a muddle.

- Is the following information correct? My boyfriend and I are going to be PACsed very soon, at this point I can be 'put on' his Carte Vitale and covered by his insurance and mutuelle.
- Will the fact I have no 'number' of my own affect my status (be it work or anything else) in the future?

Double Nationalité:
I'm considering applying for double nationality. As mentioned before, I have lived in France for the last 6years, and I'm aware that one needs to have lived in France for 5years to apply. However, I have not worked in France and I haven't been on a rental contract/bills (the flat in Paris continued in my boyfriends name, as well as the bills). - Please don't assume I've been lazing about for 6years, it's not the case!
- I'm guessing there is no possible way for me to prove to the French standards that I have lived in France for 5years? I'm assuming that attestations aren't even worth the paper they're written on.
- Does a PACs count as a marriage in the terms of applying for the double nationality?

Thank you all very much in advance!
 

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Have you been making a French tax declaration in those years?

H
 

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No...

I feel so stupid :/
Oh dear :(

I'm not sure I want to comment on the legality of that.

It sounds like you need to get your act together and "regularise" your residence here. Then you can sort out your health cover etc etc etc. THEN you can think about nationality issues.

H
 

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But I've not been working ?
Doesn't matter. If you haven't been earning then you won't have any tax to pay, but it affects your rights - and debts - to other things. If your boyfriend has been declaring you as a "dependant" (which I'm not sure he can), things like taxe d'habitation would have been reduced as a result of his lower tax liability. It also means you're not accruing any pension or healthcare rights.

So unless you have a seriously healthy private income - which you otherwise must be declaring SOMEwhere - you really do need to get this sorted asap.

H
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I left all of that to my boyfriend to sort out before I moved over here because I didn't speak a word of French. Apparently he's assured me that things are ok when they're not... I'm really starting to panic now, I've known somewhere that something can't be right.. but I've not known who to ask or turn too..

Right now I feel like a plonker and completly lost.

Where do I start finding things out? Who do I need to call or see? Bearing in mind that my French isn't fantastic?
 

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I left all of that to my boyfriend to sort out before I moved over here because I didn't speak a word of French. Apparently he's assured me that things are ok when they're not... I'm really starting to panic now, I've known somewhere that something can't be right.. but I've not known who to ask or turn too..

Right now I feel like a plonker and completly lost.

Where do I start finding things out? Who do I need to call or see? Bearing in mind that my French isn't fantastic?
RIGHT, OK
First ports of call are the Hotel des Impots and Secu, followed by CAF. If you really can't cope with the French (after six years in France - what HAVE you been doing?), make an appointment to see an Assistant Social via the Mairie or the Centre Socio-Medical. These people are generally well-educated and have some knowledge of English - or can find someone who has - and, more importantly, they're on YOUR side to help sort out all the bureaucratic niceties. But be honest with them. And, yes, there may be some backdated penalties for both you and your boyfriend because you've been living here for so long "under the radar", but, in the longer term, it should be to your advantage.

I'm sure Bev or someone else will chip in with other useful info and contacts, but you really do need to start taking responsibility for yourself and stop relying upon someone who sounds as flaky as your bf.

- and - btw - what HAVE you been doing with yourself for 6 years?

Sorry to sound so dictatorial, but it sounds like you do need a serious kick up the a***.

Hils
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've been doing my Master's degree, helping my sister in law who has an autistic child and daily dealing with my boyfriend after a breakdown after he was mise a pied from a company to whom he was loyal for 15years (and yes he won the case after 2years of tribunal with damage and interests).

You can judge me if you want, but my life hasn't been peachy since I moved to France.

Et beh, mon francais ca passe, mais les fontionaires ne sont pas trés patiente avec moi comme j'ai un accent et les mots juridique ou le jargon comme ca bah j'ai du mal avec, je trouve ca normale.

You've certainly made me feel like a class A fool. Obviously I should have dealt with this stuff... I'll do my best to manage my life better..
 

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I've been doing my Master's degree, helping my sister in law who has an autistic child and daily dealing with my boyfriend after a breakdown after he was mise a pied from a company to whom he was loyal for 15years (and yes he won the case after 2years of tribunal with damage and interests).

You can judge me if you want, but my life hasn't been peachy since I moved to France.

Et beh, mon francais ca passe, mais les fontionaires ne sont pas trés patiente avec moi comme j'ai un accent et les mots juridique ou le jargon comme ca bah j'ai du mal avec, je trouve ca normale.

You've certainly made me feel like a class A fool. Obviously I should have dealt with this stuff... I'll do my best to manage my life better..
My apologies - I didn't mean to be judgmental, but, on the basis of what you said, it was difficult not to be - sorry.

I think you will manage quite well with your French, and that you will find the fonctionnaires will be patient - it is in their interest after all - just don't pick the busiest time of day. Perhaps you can phone or drop by to make an appointment and tell them then that you might need more time than their average "client". Be humble - convince them that they are the ONLY person who can help you sort this out (which of course they aren't but it makes them feel good and needed).

& btw, none of us have a peachy life, but there are things you CAN control and influence - and should; there are others which just arrive unasked-for and out of the blue and just have to be dealt with as best as possible. We all make mistakes and take unwise decisions - few of them are life-threatening, they just tend to cost a lot :(

You can - and WILL - get this sorted. Now get on with it ...... :)

Hils
 

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OK - first of all, you're English, so at least you're not actually "sans papiers" - just kind of cruising under the radar at the moment. You're really supposed to have some sort of health care coverage - but until and unless you get caught, that's not really a problem.

You say you've been doing a master's degree - through a French university? I'm somewhat surprised they didn't ask you for some proof of insurance - but if they didn't, then they didn't. And if anyone asks you about it, you just say you had no idea. (Ideally, you should have gotten a form from the health authority in the UK to transfer your UK based benefits to France for up to your first two years here - but it's way too late for that.)

When you guys get PACS'd you will be able to go on your partner's Carte Vitale - but you will get your own social security number (and card) to use. You probably want to make sure you submit the information about your temporary number when he submits the information to URSSAF or CPAM or whoever handles that stuff these days. If you can find a job before he puts you on his card, just have your employer put in the paperwork to get you a social security number. (Some employers don't seem to want to do that these days - but it's really easy and they can do it online if they use net-entreprises.fr)

As far as nationality goes, it really won't do anything for you except give you the right to vote. Everything else you're entitled to by being an EU national. Health insurance here is a function of having paid in for a minimum period of time, and the fact of not having worked during your time living here will definitely look "strange" and could be held against you when they evaluate your level of "assimilation." Being PACS'd does not give you any advantage - you'd still be going for "naturalization" rather than taking nationality by marriage. But even if you were getting married, you'd have to show how well assimilated you've become (usually includes stuff like a job, paying taxes, etc. etc.). Probably better to wait a bit so you have all the necessary paperwork to show.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thankyou Bev.

I was planning to start soon as an auto-entrepreneur... at least I hope so... meaning I hope that all this isn't going to come and kick me in the arse and that I'll not be able to. Will I be able to do as you say and put myself in for a social security number (considering I'll be self employed)?

I'll try and call The Hotel des Impots and CAF tomorrow. Any idea how much I'll be asked to pay for the rectrospect?
 

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You may need a carte de séjour in order to sign up as an AE. As a Brit, you're entitled to get a carte de séjour (it costs, but not too much) from the préfecture. You need your British passport and some i.d. photos. Ask at your local mairie what the prefecture requires to get a carte de séjour as an EU national. Once you have that, much of the other stuff will go a bit easier, because a carte de séjour is an i.d. they "understand." (Never confuse a fonctionnaire - make it easy for them to do whatever it is you want.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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You may need a carte de séjour in order to sign up as an AE.
Cheers,
Bev
On the basis of experience, no you don't need a carte de sejour if you're a UK national, even to start as an AE.

H
 

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As far as I can tell you don't have much to worry about. You have a temporary social security number, so you have in some form been registered in France. You are and EU citizen and have not been a burden on the French state and you have been resident as a student (perfectly legal). Whichever comes first - your PACS or your AE registration, get your healthcare sorted out and get a permanent social security number. Either by having your boyfriend declare you as his "ayant droit" if your PACS is first, or by registering with RAM as part of your AE registration. And then go to the tax office, plead ignorance and ask what they want you to declare in terms of missed years. Once you are PACsed you will declare your tax affairs with your boyfriend so it should get simpler in the future.
I can't see why you would need to involve or contact CAF unless you have children.
 

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I can't see why you would need to involve or contact CAF unless you have children.
CAF is/has a wealth of information about your rights and duties, whether you have children or not. They'll tell you if you don't need to be talking to them, but will point you in the right direction for the people you do need to be talking to. That's all ..... in the situation this poster is in, she should be looking for any and all sources of help and info.

H
 

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I suggest a rendez-vous with an assistant social he/she will give you most of the information needed.
exactly what I said way back when ....
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks everyone for the continued flow of information. I'm in the process of dealing with all of it.

To my surprise (but probably not to yours!) I need even more certification for my PACS in France then I thought. I already had the certificat de coutume, but I also need to contact the Ministere des affaires étrangers and have a certificate from the tribunal in Paris to show I'm not already PACs'd in France (since I've lived in France for more then a year).

I'm getting my head round it all with the help of my in-law family :)

Once I have that sorted I'll go for the next hurdle (but I'll contact a assistant social between now and then!).

For the AE I heard on the news today that they're probably going to change it considerably in the near future, so I'll have to think my way round that too !

Thanks again for all of your help :)
 

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It's probably almost easier to just get married in France than to PACS (and practically speaking, I still don't understand the big difference). But cheer up, if you were getting married, you'd have to get both a certificat de coutume AND a certificate of celibacy. The French do love their paperwork!

However it does sound like you're making progress! Keep us posted.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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