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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello,

i am an american artist who is thinking about moving to france from germany.
i currently have long-term residency as well as working papers in germany, as well as health insurance through the german artist union.
my family has purchased property in france and i have been back and forth between germany and france all summer, working on the old house in france, and doing my best to keep up with exhibitions in germany.
although i would like to move to france permanently, the process of getting a cartes de séjour seems like a pain in the neck, especially given the fact that i already have papers and am already squared away in germany.

can someone provide with a link or some info about beginning the process of getting a cartes de séjour, how long it typically takes, what are the pitfalls, etc.

much appreciated for any and all infos in advance.

allbest,

tra
 
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Suggest you look at the first thread on the France page ; New rules for some categories demanding "le titre de sejour".

Its a 'sticky' thread so it will stay at the top.
 

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You might want to take a look at this page, from the EU portal website: Status of Non-EU Member Country nationals who are long-term residents

I've only had a chance to skim it, but it looks promising if you've been living in Germany for 5 years or more. Scroll down to the bit about "Right of residence in the other Member States" - as usual, there are plenty of disclaimers, but it seems to promise some lightening up of the procedures.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I've only had a chance to skim it, but it looks promising if you've been living in Germany for 5 years or more. Scroll down to the bit about "Right of residence in the other Member States" - as usual, there are plenty of disclaimers, but it seems to promise some lightening up of the procedures.
Cheers,
Bev
thanks a lot bev. i've been living in germany for 3 years come february, when i would have to go in and renew my visa. so unfortunately i don't qualify for the 'right of residence in other member states'.

is there a site detailing the process of acquiring a working and/or residential visa here in france? it seems like everyone i ask has a different answer to that question and it would be great to get some reliable information on all that.
much appreciated,

tra
 

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You' re making me extremely nervous because I ran into considerable immigration difficulty when I attempted to move from Germany to France. Officially, you have to request your visa through the French consulate in Germany, since that' s your legal residence at the moment.

Now, it has been a few years - and many changes to the immigration laws - but I got the distinct impression that the guys at the consulate in Germany didn' t have a clue how to handle a visa application from an American and were more interested in avoiding the problem altogether. Hence, I got bad information and wound up spending nearly 2 years as an illegal here in France.

You should start by contacting the French consulate in Germany (last I knew, there was one in Stuttgart), but don' t be surprised if they aren' t too sure what to tell you, but don' t want to admit they don' t know. There is every reason to hope that the situation has improved in the 15 years since I dealt with them.... but maintain a healthy skepticism if anything they tell you just doesn' t sound right somehow.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You' re making me extremely nervous because I ran into considerable immigration difficulty when I attempted to move from Germany to France. Officially, you have to request your visa through the French consulate in Germany, since that' s your legal residence at the moment.

Now, it has been a few years - and many changes to the immigration laws - but I got the distinct impression that the guys at the consulate in Germany didn' t have a clue how to handle a visa application from an American and were more interested in avoiding the problem altogether. Hence, I got bad information and wound up spending nearly 2 years as an illegal here in France.

You should start by contacting the French consulate in Germany (last I knew, there was one in Stuttgart), but don' t be surprised if they aren' t too sure what to tell you, but don' t want to admit they don' t know. There is every reason to hope that the situation has improved in the 15 years since I dealt with them.... but maintain a healthy skepticism if anything they tell you just doesn' t sound right somehow.
Cheers,
Bev
hmm. well, inasmuch as i'm about to run out of my time on my german papers (if i don't renew them) in february 2010, i suppose i might as well just let that happen and go on with getting the french papers in hopes that that wil dovetail right into the correct window of time after that.
where can i find simple, up to date, information on just getting a carte de sejour?

many thanks in advance,

tra
 

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where can i find simple, up to date, information on just getting a carte de sejour?
To get a carte de sejour, you have to go through a local prefecture - the one in the departement where you are becoming resident. And recently the process has been changed so that your first year, you may need to present your validated visa to the OFII (a recently renamed office dealing with immigration matters). At this point, you need to go to the consulate and get yourself a visa (long-stay, I would imagine). You could check the visa requirements for any of the French consulates in the US to get an idea for what is required.

France isn't noted for providing "simple, up to date" information on most administrative procedures, and the visa and immigration requirements have been changing rapidly over the last year or so. The main thing usually is that you have to show you have a "reason" for wanting to live in France (i.e. family ties, study or work) and the means to provide for yourself while you're there (again, family, work or savings).
Cheers,
Bev
 
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