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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone actually done the new citizenship application and test, since the rules change in April? Has the process actually been updated yet? does everyone now need to do an English test, and has the test been updated?

thanks
Rich
 

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Has anyone actually done the new citizenship application and test, since the rules change in April? Has the process actually been updated yet? does everyone now need to do an English test, and has the test been updated?

thanks
Rich
Actually the new law has been passed by the parliament and is currently with senate committee. All the applications since the announcement of changes are withheld and will be processed once the decision has been made by senate.

If it's passed then everyone needs to live at least 4 years on permanent resident VISA and have competent English (IELTS 6.0 and equivalent) to get their citizenship.
 

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Has anyone actually done the new citizenship application and test, since the rules change in April? Has the process actually been updated yet? does everyone now need to do an English test, and has the test been updated?

thanks
Rich
The Bill (that is, the first draft of the proposed changes) was introduced to Parliament on 15 June, and referred to the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee on 22 June. They will report their views by 4 September.

After that, any changes will have to be made, and the Bill will have to be reconsidered by Parliament. So that discussion will probably happen later this year.

Whether the bill becomes law, and with what changes, is unknown - it depends on Parliament at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, I guess then, there is no point applying until it's gone through?

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Thanks, I guess then, there is no point applying until it's gone through?

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
It may be that if they are stockpiling applications, and when the new law is passed (or not) then they may process applications in order of lodgement. May.

There will be a lot of applications and processing times are long, so that may be something to think about - if and/or when you meet the PR residence condition. :)
 

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Actually the new law has been passed by the parliament and is currently with senate committee. All the applications since the announcement of changes are withheld and will be processed once the decision has been made by senate.

If it's passed then everyone needs to live at least 4 years on permanent resident VISA and have competent English (IELTS 6.0 and equivalent) to get their citizenship.
No, it doesn't work that way. :)

To be passed into law, a Bill must be passed by both Houses of Parliament, the House or Representatives, and the Senate. Together, these constitute the Parliament of Australia. The Bill must then receive Royal Assent. Only then does the "Bill" become an "Act of Parliament" - a law.

First, a law must be proposed - a draft Act of Parliament. In has no legal standing yet.

That is called a "Bill". A "Bill" is a proposal for a new law, or a proposal to change an existing law.

A "Bill" only becomes an Act of Parliament - a law - when it has been passed by both Houses of Parliament and has received assent from the Governor-General.

It works this way:

Normally the Minister responsible gives written notice to the House of Representatives that he/she will propose a Bill, for whatever purpose.

The next sitting day of the House, the Bill is read for the first time, and is available for all members, and the public, to see.

Normally immediately after this, the Minister moves that the Bill be read a second time, and then makes a speech explaining all the details to the House. After that, debate is deferred to give Members time to study the Bill, and to allow for public discussion and reaction.

One option (there are other options too) during the process is for the Bill to be referred to a committee to gather information, evidence, witnesses, etc, as it sees fit - but the committee cannot change the Bill. The committee can then make recommendations to the House.

This is where the new proposed Citizenship Bill is right now - the second reading (in the House of Representatives) has been moved, but the second reading debate hasn't happened yet.

Then, some (often considerable) time later, there is the second reading debate. The opposition and other Members have their say. After that, there is a vote by the House to establish whether the Bill can be read a second time. If the House approves, that effectively signifies the second reading of the Bill is complete.

After this, the Bill may or may not be considered in detail, depending on Members. The third reading of the Bill, after this point, is pretty much just a formality.

After the Bill is passed, it goes to the Senate - three readings there too. The Senate can agree, or send the bill back to House with proposed changes. These may be agreed to or not, and there may be some communication between the two Houses about this at that time. If the Bill doesn't get agreement by both Houses, it may be laid aside (effectively, dropped) unless it's something imperative like a Supply Bill. Then, there can be a double dissolution and a fresh election.

When a Bill has passed both Houses in identical form, it becomes law after it is presented to the Governor-General and gets his/her assent - whether starting from that date, or retrospectively, or from a future date.

It's important to understand that Labor and the Greens have signified they will not pass the law in its present form - to pass the law, there would either need to be changes, or the Government will need to get votes from the cross-bench in the Senate so it can get the numbers to pass the Bill there.

kaju
 

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No, it doesn't work that way. :)

To be passed into law, a Bill must be passed by both Houses of Parliament, the House or Representatives, and the Senate. Together, these constitute the Parliament of Australia. The Bill must then receive Royal Assent. Only then does the "Bill" become an "Act of Parliament" - a law.

First, a law must be proposed - a draft Act of Parliament. In has no legal standing yet.
That is called a "Bill".

A "Bill" only becomes an Act of Parliament - a law - when it has been passed by both Houses of Parliament and has received assent form the Governor-General.

It works this way:

Normally the Minister responsible gives written notice to the House of Representatives that he/she will propose a Bill.

The next sitting day of the House, the Bill is read for the first time, and is available for all members, and the public, to see.

Normally immediately after this, the Minister moves that the Bill be read a second time, and then makes a speech explaining all the details to the House. After that, debate is deferred to give Members time to study the Bill, and to allow for public discussion and reaction.

One option during the process is for the Bill to be referred to a committee to gather information, evidence, witnesses, etc, as it sees it - but the committee cannot change the Bill. The committee can then make recommendations to the House.

This is where the new proposed Citizenship Bill is right now - the second reading (in the House of Representatives) has been moved, but the second reading debate hasn't happened yet.

Then, some (often considerable) time later, there is the second reading debate. The opposition and other Members have their say. After that, there is a vote by the House to establish whether the Bill can be read a second time. If the House approves, that effectively signifies the second reading of the Bill is complete.

After this, the Bill may or may not be considered in detail, depending on Members. The third reading of the Bill, after this point, is pretty much just a formality.

After the Bill is passed, it goes to the Senate - three readings there too. The Senate can agree, or send the bill back to House with proposed changes. These may be agreed to or not, and there may be some communication between the two Houses about this at that time. If the Bill doesn't get agreement by both Houses, it may be laid aside (effectively, dropped) unless it's something imperative like a Supply Bill. Then, there can be a double dissolution and a fresh election.

When a Bill has passed both Houses in identical form, it becomes law after it is presented to the Governor-General and gets his/her assent - whether starting from that date, or retrospectively, or from a future date.

It's important to understand that Labor and the Greens have signified they will not pass the law in its present form - to pass the law, there would either need to be changes, or the Government will need to get votes form the cross-bench in the Senate so it can get the numbers to pass the Bill there.

kaju


Thanks for explanation. It's really helpful.
 

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No, it doesn't work that way. :)

To be passed into law, a Bill must be passed by both Houses of Parliament, the House or Representatives, and the Senate. Together, these constitute the Parliament of Australia. The Bill must then receive Royal Assent. Only then does the "Bill" become an "Act of Parliament" - a law.

First, a law must be proposed - a draft Act of Parliament. In has no legal standing yet.
That is called a "Bill".

A "Bill" only becomes an Act of Parliament - a law - when it has been passed by both Houses of Parliament and has received assent form the Governor-General.

It works this way:

Normally the Minister responsible gives written notice to the House of Representatives that he/she will propose a Bill, for whatever purpose.

The next sitting day of the House, the Bill is read for the first time, and is available for all members, and the public, to see.

Normally immediately after this, the Minister moves that the Bill be read a second time, and then makes a speech explaining all the details to the House. After that, debate is deferred to give Members time to study the Bill, and to allow for public discussion and reaction.

One option during the process is for the Bill to be referred to a committee to gather information, evidence, witnesses, etc, as it sees it - but the committee cannot change the Bill. The committee can then make recommendations to the House.

This is where the new proposed Citizenship Bill is right now - the second reading (in the House of Representatives) has been moved, but the second reading debate hasn't happened yet.

Then, some (often considerable) time later, there is the second reading debate. The opposition and other Members have their say. After that, there is a vote by the House to establish whether the Bill can be read a second time. If the House approves, that effectively signifies the second reading of the Bill is complete.

After this, the Bill may or may not be considered in detail, depending on Members. The third reading of the Bill, after this point, is pretty much just a formality.

After the Bill is passed, it goes to the Senate - three readings there too. The Senate can agree, or send the bill back to House with proposed changes. These may be agreed to or not, and there may be some communication between the two Houses about this at that time. If the Bill doesn't get agreement by both Houses, it may be laid aside (effectively, dropped) unless it's something imperative like a Supply Bill. Then, there can be a double dissolution and a fresh election.

When a Bill has passed both Houses in identical form, it becomes law after it is presented to the Governor-General and gets his/her assent - whether starting from that date, or retrospectively, or from a future date.

It's important to understand that Labor and the Greens have signified they will not pass the law in its present form - to pass the law, there would either need to be changes, or the Government will need to get votes form the cross-bench in the Senate so it can get the numbers to pass the Bill there.

kaju
Excellent briefing. So from your observation and perspective what's your call? Is this bill likely to be passed and brought into effect or highly likely to be laid off due to lesser votes?

Cheers,
Kaushik.

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Excellent briefing. So from your observation and perspective what's your call? Is this bill likely to be passed and brought into effect or highly likely to be laid off due to lesser votes?

Cheers,
Kaushik.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
Well, I'm not the Parliament so I don't know! :)

If I had to guess, I'd say it is likely to pass, close to the end of the year - there will maybe need to be some deals with the cross-bench to pass the Bill. Even then it may not pass exactly as it is - it's not uncommon for some changes to be made along the way to get a Bill passed.

I'd also hope that the Committee recommendations and public reaction may cause the Government to at least lower the IELTS level requirement a bit too, and possibly there maybe some changes for the test. I suspect the 4 year residency requirement will be accepted.

But for all of that, we'll have to wait and see - your guess may be as good as mine, or perhaps better! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replies all. The current applications on the immi site, look the same as the old ones, with plenty of info on the coming changes. It seems to me that they dont actually know what the process will be. How can you have people applying with the old forms and supporting docs, and then process them based on the new rules (which require extra supporting docs)! I think I'll just have to wait until its all sorted out, and then we'll know what we actually need to submit, and what the process will be.
 
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