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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I need some help and I think that you guys (and girls, of course) might be the ones that can help me.

The thing is this - I am looking for a job and I do not have too much experience doing so. It is funny that someone after more or less 6 years of studies has not learned this basic thing. There is a subject for the schools to put forward!

Anyway, as I guess most of you actually do have a job, I therefore cannot find anyone more suitable to help me find one as well. I am not necessarily asking You to give me a job per se (hey, I am listening to everything though), I am merely asking you for your advise, any advise.

When google-ing the net I found little good information and I therefore started my own blog (loooking4job-blog) (no urls where allowed initially, but you know the drill) where I will make entries about my life looking4job (failures, success, what to do, what not to do etc.). I am hoping that what you tell me can help me be better at it.

So, why not help a young guy on his way, build some karma (I’ve heard it’s good for you).

First question: What should I do and how should I do it to get a job?

Thanks!
Daniel
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Yes, I will of course go to some job websites to have a look. Do you know of any good ones?
But how will i know what kind of job that is suitable for me? I haven't had a real full-time job before, my educational background is law, but even though I definitely could see my self work in that field I do not want to limit myself to that. What do you think I should do, any suggestions are welcome.
 

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Start networking like there is no tomorrow. Who do you know? Who do they know? Get your wardrobe in order. Have resumes proofed, proofed and proofed. Nothing like a silly typo:>) Get involved in organizations such as Chamber of Commerce, Young Professionals ... short - get your face on the streeet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think networking might do the trick, and I will definitely walk down that road. And I have joined my native country chamber of commerce. But what do you mean about getting your wardrobe in order and have my resume proofed?
 

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I think networking might do the trick, and I will definitely walk down that road. And I have joined my native country chamber of commerce. But what do you mean about getting your wardrobe in order and have my resume proofed?
You are a professional, are you not? In eight years I have maybe seen 10-15 resumes without a typo. Nasty little critters make you look like you did not read what you handed out. Polished shoes, groomed nails, extra shirt/tie in the car (nothing like coffee when you are in a hurry), feeling and acting like you are comfortable in pofessional attire not like this is dress-up ... the basics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see what you mean - to be a professional you have to act accordingly, be comfortable in those shoes etc..

And no, I am not yet a professional, but that is exactly what I am trying to be.

Thanks for the advice, may I put your advice on my blog (I will make a reference to where I got it from)?
 

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Wear the shoes at home, get used to suit/tie, quit using your college punch words - grow up a bit. Be polite, remember names and stories behind the names, be pleasant, follow up on a casual conversation.
 

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Cliche but... be yourself. If you feel uncomfortable wearing a tie or suit, and don't want to go working with this set of clothing, then don't wear it for your interview neither. You gotta be yourself because, after all, you wanna be hired for who you are rather than for the role you played, not?

Keep a CV updated. I have two versions of mine, a lengthy one with lot of details on the jobs done, and a short one only summarising without much explanation. Depending on the company or vacancy you can then see which version suits best (often the job agency will know the companies and give you advice)

Visit the website of the company prior to your job interview ; if you know the backgrounds of the company, this usually gives a very good impression. Think about previous tough situations at work and how you handled them, because this is a question often re-occuring in interviews. If the recruiter asks you your weaknesses (also a common one) then try to answer with something which isn't necessarily a bad thing (for example: I sometimes pay too much attention to details, am a bit perfectionist, ... -- this can be a benefit in some situations so you answered the question without reducing your chances to be hired)

Something I do is keeping an address list of companies and recruitment agencies sorted per country or city, which I try to keep updated as well although the latter isn't always easy. But it can come in handy for future reference.

Networking is extraordinary important to find out where the jobs can be found, as not all vacancies are widespread on the standard recruitment sites or in frequently used recruitment agencies. LinkedIn is a great networking tool for this, some may also use Facebook for this but I'd be reluctant to use FB for jobhunting purposes.
 

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IMO make a killing CV and submit this on different job portal sites. Use your social networks/contacts i.e. friends/family friends. Go to freelancer, craigslist, ODesk and other sites. I am sure you'll find some good job related to your field.
 

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Never heard of ODesk but Craigslist ?! Craigslist is very handy for second hand stuff, event tickets, dating of friendship announcements, vending/selling music or computers etc... But I never heard of people using this site particularly for jobhunting , I'd also be surprised if many employers would publish their vacancies there. Usually, they'll either recruit through agencies or -if they use any sites- LinkedIn and similar career-focused sites would be the first place they'll publish vacancies. LinkedIn can be an extremely useful tool, and unlike Facebook etc this networking site is used for what it was created for and not for any silly games or such. If you use LinkedIn well, you can get a great amount of addresses of companies in a specific city or country which you would not easily find at other places.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
CV is a hard nut to crack, as either it seems as people think it is too long and full of not important content, or it is too short and not providing all the content that you have and wish to express. I have as, Gerrit, one short and one longer but to whom do I send which?

All that has been stated above are important and of course helpful, but I cannot sometimes feel like it gets too much. What I mean is that sometimes it feels like you spend too much time on amending and improving something that from the start wasn't all that bad. E.g. a CV. The taste of CV's is like a persons behind - divided.

If you would put things to do in some form of order what would you regard as the most important?

Once again, I am very thankful for all advice and I am absolutely going to use and be help by them. I am also thinking of compiling them together and make one or several entries about them on my blog, would that be okay for you who gave me the advices?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This is going to sound weird, but I have not heard about Linkedln before. I will definitely look that up. Do you think it is as good for a person with none to little work experience (at least there is nothing wrong with my educational experience:)), as I have?
 

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Never heard of ODesk but Craigslist ?! Craigslist is very handy for second hand stuff, event tickets, dating of friendship announcements, vending/selling music or computers etc... But I never heard of people using this site particularly for jobhunting , I'd also be surprised if many employers would publish their vacancies there. Usually, they'll either recruit through agencies or -if they use any sites- LinkedIn and similar career-focused sites would be the first place they'll publish vacancies. LinkedIn can be an extremely useful tool, and unlike Facebook etc this networking site is used for what it was created for and not for any silly games or such. If you use LinkedIn well, you can get a great amount of addresses of companies in a specific city or country which you would not easily find at other places.
Depends on the area, but our local craigslist has lots of job postings. Many of them are for really good employers, like government.

What also helps is practice interviews. Just apply for jobs, any jobs, and consider the interview practice for when you land "the perfect job offer." Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I do not want to boost, and there is perhaps not much to boost about since I have only been to about ten interviews in my short life, but I have always landed the job or other position when I have been to an interview. I guess that is one of my strengths.

But everything can be better.
 

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as for a CV: I tend to attach both the short and long version to the application mail, with "short" and "extended" in the title. The interviewer/HR worker can then choose the version he likes best : a detailed long one, or a short summarised one.

When applying through a job agency, they can usually advice weither it's best to send the short or long version of your CV as they usually know the recruiters that post job vacancies through their agency. Sometimes they even know the interviewers well enough to advise on replies they like to hear during the interview.

Also, keep in mind that local traditions play their part in a CV. For example I learnt to list previous jobs in chronological order, while in some of the other countries where I lived it's more a habit to list them starting with the most recent experience and then listing them with your first job at the end.



LinkedIn is definitely good for ANYONE who is serious about jobhunting. The one thing you need to keep in mind (and this is why I like LinkedIn): this is one of the few really well used networking sites. By that I mean: sites like Facebook and MySpace are networking sites where most people come to just chat and have fun. LinkedIn is not a networking site for the sake of making lot of new friends and play funny games, it's about exchanging information about jobs specifically and network for professional purposes only. But because it's used for that, it becomes very effective, you don't have to search the useful info hidden in a pile of silly applications and discussions, because LinkedIn is really business orientated.



Two things which makes jobhunting a hassle for me:
1) I deliberately change jobs only when changing location. I always dreamt of living in different countries, it was my childhood dream and now I'm realising the dream. I only changed jobs so far when I decided to relocate to another country. The problem is that the employment search may be different in the country you wish to go to, and finding the right vacancies or the right job listings or direct contacts of employers isn't easy from a distance. For example if I decide I want to move to Brazil, I will somehow have to find a listing of Brazilian employers known to hire foreigners, and some reliable job sites listing useful vacancies for Brazil. Just a random example but you catch my drift of why this is trickier than to go jobhunting locally.
I keep a list of addresses per country, you never know it may come in handy sometime :)

2) the question I hate most of all is the "where do you see yourself in 3 years time? what is your ambition?" etc. That's just lying that's required whenever an interviewer asks that. I mean, they want to hear stuff like "hope to be promoted and make my way up the hierarchy of the company", whereas in reality I am simply totally uninterested to grow to a management position or so (moreover, I rather wouldn't, because of all the hassle involved with it. But being honest in that will more or less make your chance to get the job extremely small, it's easy to apply for for example a secretary job but the average employer doesn't like it when you are fine with staying at that level of the hierarchy)
 
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