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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hola amigos! With the new laws in effect for residency, and having gotten my Residente Permanente, I find myself in a bit of a dilemma.
Our vehicle was exported from the US and imported to Mexico (that a whole 'nother story) and thus no longer insured to be driven in the USA.
Does anyone know how to get non-owner liability insurance that would cover me in Canada and the US? Is there such a thing as international driving insurance for non-owned vehicles, such as when you borrow or rent a vehicle in either Canada, US or Mexico?
I currently have Mexican Auto Insurance but I don't believe Canada or the US will respect it.

Thanks for any help or advice.
 

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Hola amigos! With the new laws in effect for residency, and having gotten my Residente Permanente, I find myself in a bit of a dilemma.
Our vehicle was exported from the US and imported to Mexico (that a whole 'nother story) and thus no longer insured to be driven in the USA.
Does anyone know how to get non-owner liability insurance that would cover me in Canada and the US? Is there such a thing as international driving insurance for non-owned vehicles, such as when you borrow or rent a vehicle in either Canada, US or Mexico?
I currently have Mexican Auto Insurance but I don't believe Canada or the US will respect it.
Thanks for any help or advice.
Now, wait, Stephen, if you don´t own the car did you steal it up there in the U.S? I am just joking, of course, but I don´t quite understand how you exported a car into Mexico without owning it. I presume it is leased and U.S,.plated.

What I do believe I know is that you can get full insurance in the U.S. and Canada for rental car but I am almost certain that, if you are driving a personally owned vehicle up there with Mexican plates you will only be able to purchase liability coverage. Any other coverage contained in a Mexican auto insurance policy

You have brought up a good point. Sincé we live witihin a few kilometers of the Guatemala border in Chiapas, we sometimes travel there by car but we will not take our personally owned vehicles into any place in Central America and, frankly, we probably would not take our cars into the U.S. or Canada either. We mostly travel in France or Guatemala but rent cars at local agencies in those countries rather than drive our personally owned cars there. Too risky in our opinions. We rarely return to the U.S. but if we did we would fly up ther and rent a car locally. Too many Billy Bob deputy sheriffs just waiting to harass you with those Mexican or California plates and God help you if you have an accident in which you can be implicated.

One more thing. Sincé we have two personally owned cars and live in homes some 1500 kilometers apart here in Mexico, we plan to leave one car in Chiapas and one in Jalisco. We may spend six months in each place so we don´t want either car to become inopperable when we are out of town for several months. We haven´t tried this yet but we are told that we simply need to disconnect the battery cables on the car we are not using for several months to avoid a power drain. You might want to leave your car there in Nayarit and fly to Canada - otherwise that deputy sheriff Billy Bob just might pull you over in Texas and being pulled over in Texas by some ******* cop is not a desirable event.
 

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Thanks. I agree on all points made. My issue is that I have no insurance to drive. It's next to impossible to get insurance when you don't own a vehicle. I am hoping to get on my wife's policy, but she is Canadian and I am US. Could pose issues. The farther I recede from the system, the more challenging it is to function. It seems to be an "either or" system––constantly invest your funds into corporate America or suffer the consequences.
I just talked to Geiko Insurance. They won't touch me, probably due to the non ownership and dual country profile.
Frustrating!
 

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Now, wait, Stephen, if you don´t own the car did you steal it up there in the U.S? I am just joking, of course, but I don´t quite understand how you exported a car into Mexico without owning it. I presume it is leased and U.S,.plated.

What I do believe I know is that you can get full insurance in the U.S. and Canada for rental car but I am almost certain that, if you are driving a personally owned vehicle up there with Mexican plates you will only be able to purchase liability coverage. Any other coverage contained in a Mexican auto insurance policy

You have brought up a good point. Sincé we live witihin a few kilometers of the Guatemala border in Chiapas, we sometimes travel there by car but we will not take our personally owned vehicles into any place in Central America and, frankly, we probably would not take our cars into the U.S. or Canada either. We mostly travel in France or Guatemala but rent cars at local agencies in those countries rather than drive our personally owned cars there. Too risky in our opinions. We rarely return to the U.S. but if we did we would fly up ther and rent a car locally. Too many Billy Bob deputy sheriffs just waiting to harass you with those Mexican or California plates and God help you if you have an accident in which you can be implicated.

One more thing. Sincé we have two personally owned cars and live in homes some 1500 kilometers apart here in Mexico, we plan to leave one car in Chiapas and one in Jalisco. We may spend six months in each place so we don´t want either car to become inopperable when we are out of town for several months. We haven´t tried this yet but we are told that we simply need to disconnect the battery cables on the car we are not using for several months to avoid a power drain. You might want to leave your car there in Nayarit and fly to Canada - otherwise that deputy sheriff Billy Bob just might pull you over in Texas and being pulled over in Texas by some ******* cop is not a desirable event.
Re: Parking a car for six months.

Disconnecting the battery will help some, but batteries discharge slowly even when disconnected. You will probably want to invest in a modern trickle charger and put it on the battery for a few hours after you return to each spot.

The bigger problem is that it is not good for the engine to sit for long periods of time without being used. Moisture in the air condenses on engine parts, the lubricating film of oil that normally coats everything in an engine gradually degrades. It is not good for the pistons to sit with the rings in the same place for extended periods of time.

Incidentally, having someone start the engine and idle it parked for 5 minutes once in awhile is even worse. Water is one of the products of combusting gasoline. When an engine is hot, the water that is produced all evaporates and is harmless. But 5 minutes is not enough to get the engine hot. A sitting car really needs to be driven for a half hour once in a while so that it comes fully up to temperature and the engine heat dries it out thoroughly when it is shut off.

You certainly can leave a car stored for extended periods of time, but it will shorten the life span of the vehicle and you are likely to encounter problems when you first start using it. The stories you hear about people reviving old cars that have been stored in someone's barn for decades all involve extensive part replacement before they are back on the road.
 

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Damn good advice, Will. I have fretted for a time about this issue and am not surprised at your comment. We had all along intended to sell that old 2004 Nissan XTrail when we bought the 2015 Mazda CX-5 and we have lots of Mexican friends and acquaintances both here at Lake Chapala and Chiapas who have seriously offered to buy it for decent prices. Your advice is much appreciated and well taken. After all, to make matters easier to conclude, one does not really need a car at all in San Cristóbal, an easily walkable city wherever one may be going and to make matters even nicer, no taxis have meters and all taxi rides in town are $30 Pesos - period - to go anywhere in the city and the taxi drivers could not be more pleasant. In addition, renting a car down there or travelling about by colectivo is incredibly convenient and cheap.

Once again, many thanks - I will follow you advice and get rid of that old car.
 
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