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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My understanding is that non-EU residents need to be legally working & pay into the system in order to get anything out of it. But how does the coverage vary by the amount paid in and the years paid in? I think I have read every thread about health insurance, but I never see any mention of specifics like "for every dollar/ year you pay in you get X amount of coverage." I have to imagine that if a non-EU person gets a visa to work in Spain, works for 3 years, quits and gets a retirement or non-lucrative visa, they will not be entitled to the same coverage as someone who has worked in Spain for 30 years.

If anyone has any info, website or links, I would greatly appreciate it.
 

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My understanding is that non-EU residents need to be legally working & pay into the system in order to get anything out of it. But how does the coverage vary by the amount paid in and the years paid in? I think I have read every thread about health insurance, but I never see any mention of specifics like "for every dollar/ year you pay in you get X amount of coverage." I have to imagine that if a non-EU person gets a visa to work in Spain, works for 3 years, quits and gets a retirement or non-lucrative visa, they will not be entitled to the same coverage as someone who has worked in Spain for 30 years.

If anyone has any info, website or links, I would greatly appreciate it.

As long as you are working and making contributions you are entitled to healthcare. There isn't a cap on how much!
 

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As long as you are working and making contributions you are entitled to healthcare. There isn't a cap on how much!
exactly

as it stands at the moment, anyone working legally & paying tax & NI contributions is entitled to healthcare - regardless of nationality

the important part of that statement is working legally
 

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You´ll have to go private I think, free healthcare for pensioners only applies to EU citizens and their dependants. And even that might change soon ...
but if they've been working legally & paying NI contributions then they'll get a pension surely :confused2:


but as you say - things are changing so rapidly atm I'm not even sure we'll be entitled to healthcare even though I pay into the system
 

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To qualify for the minimum Spanish pension you need to pay at least 15 years into the Social Security system. That should, as things are at the moment, also entitle you to public health care. But as other poster hsave mentioned things are changing rapidly.
 

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Oh, I did not know that. But what happens to non-EU workers when they retire though?
Perhaps its the same as say, UK workers who move to the US to work on a work visa.

If at the end of their working life they have not made the change to permanent resident/citizen, they kick you out.!
 

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To qualify for the minimum Spanish pension you need to pay at least 15 years into the Social Security system. That should, as things are at the moment, also entitle you to public health care. But as other poster hsave mentioned things are changing rapidly.
That was my understanding but a while back on another forum someone who had retired stated that he received a spanish pension, as well as pensions from other countries, on only 9 years paying in.:confused2:
 

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That was my understanding but a while back on another forum someone who had retired stated that he received a spanish pension, as well as pensions from other countries, on only 9 years paying in.:confused2:
I believe the rules are different for EU citizens who can count any period working in other EU member states towards meeting the 15 year minimum qualifying period.
 

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I believe the rules are different for EU citizens who can count any period working in other EU member states towards meeting the 15 year minimum qualifying period.
As I understand it where a qualifying time is required EU governments are obliged to take other periods worked in the EU into account, except for financial benefits !
Each member state pays the pension you have earned in that particular member state.
So you may get perhaps a pension from the UK and one from Spain. :confused2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Two questions about non-Eu expats seeking Spanish citizenship:
My understanding is that they will need to legally live in Spain for 10 years in order to apply for Spanish citizenship. But do they need to be working during this time?
Also, do ALL citizens of Spain get national health care? Or do citizens only get it when they pay into the system via work?

I ask because IF Spain gives permanent residency to people buying homes for over 160,000, and those people apply for citizenship after 10 years, I wonder if they would get national health care.
 

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Two questions about non-Eu expats seeking Spanish citizenship:
My understanding is that they will need to legally live in Spain for 10 years in order to apply for Spanish citizenship. But do they need to be working during this time?
Also, do ALL citizens of Spain get national health care? Or do citizens only get it when they pay into the system via work?

I ask because IF Spain gives permanent residency to people buying homes for over 160,000, and those people apply for citizenship after 10 years, I wonder if they would get national health care.
Who knows.
From what I've read, the home buying/residency scheme doesn't automatically allow you to work.

While I was here on a student visa, I didn't have access to the public health system. I'm currently self-employed and paying into the system and can access basic health care. For more advanced things (eg. maternity leave) I have to pay for a certain amount of time first.
 

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Two questions about non-Eu expats seeking Spanish citizenship:
My understanding is that they will need to legally live in Spain for 10 years in order to apply for Spanish citizenship. But do they need to be working during this time?
Also, do ALL citizens of Spain get national health care? Or do citizens only get it when they pay into the system via work?

I ask because IF Spain gives permanent residency to people buying homes for over 160,000, and those people apply for citizenship after 10 years, I wonder if they would get national health care.
yes it is a big IF still

if the healthcare aspect works as it does for EU residents coming here now, & logically it should, in order to access state healthcare you'd need to be contributing in some way, so working in the case of non-EU citizens, since afaik there are no reciprocal agreements with non-EU countries

there was talk of a 'buy-in' system to be put in place, but that hasn't happened yet, either

I would imagine that if citizenship was granted you'd have the same rights to healthcare as any other citizen - whatever that may be by then

until late last year even citizens didn't get free healthcare unless they were paying NI
 

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The other point about being granted citizenship after ten years - you asked if one had to be working for those 10 years.

The answer is no - think of children who have been here for 10 years and then wish to apply for citizenship. They won't have worked for the 10 years but are still allowed to apply for citizenship.
 

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The other point about being granted citizenship after ten years - you asked if one had to be working for those 10 years.

The answer is no - think of children who have been here for 10 years and then wish to apply for citizenship. They won't have worked for the 10 years but are still allowed to apply for citizenship.
The rules are changing on everything at the moment !
This from http://www.theentertaineronline.com


Taking the Plunge. Spanish Nationality (2nd Class)

Thursday 28 March 2013 - 18:34:48

Foreigners can, of course, become Spaniards. Sometimes, despite the accent or the pale (and pinkish) Scandinavian looks, a person can whip out his DNI Card, with one name and two apellidos on it, and say 'Wotcher, me old cock, I'm a local person too. By the way, what time is the paella on?'. Only of course, in Spanish.
You might think, that with the new Worldwide Asset Declaration, we were all to be made Honorary Spaniards anyway. Anyhow, as we non-Spanish Europeans fiddle with our passports and green police cards ('this letter is of no use without a passport, but it does have a tax identification on it. And a paella stain') we may decide to become Spaniards and be done with the bother. Now, new rules mean we would have to (yes, yes, fill out reams of paperwork) swear loyalty to the King and the Constitution... and show that we can speak enough Spanish and know which side of the table setting the fork goes. But wait, there's more.
You can now become a Spaniard, say goodbye to your own country (perhaps with relief and a rude note to the ambassador), but the Ministerio del Interior will reserve the right to strip you of your new nationality if you misbehave or 'for reasons of security'.
So what would you have to say to your old mates then?
 

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The rules are changing on everything at the moment !
This from http://www.theentertaineronline.com


Taking the Plunge. Spanish Nationality (2nd Class)

Thursday 28 March 2013 - 18:34:48

Foreigners can, of course, become Spaniards. Sometimes, despite the accent or the pale (and pinkish) Scandinavian looks, a person can whip out his DNI Card, with one name and two apellidos on it, and say 'Wotcher, me old cock, I'm a local person too. By the way, what time is the paella on?'. Only of course, in Spanish.
You might think, that with the new Worldwide Asset Declaration, we were all to be made Honorary Spaniards anyway. Anyhow, as we non-Spanish Europeans fiddle with our passports and green police cards ('this letter is of no use without a passport, but it does have a tax identification on it. And a paella stain') we may decide to become Spaniards and be done with the bother. Now, new rules mean we would have to (yes, yes, fill out reams of paperwork) swear loyalty to the King and the Constitution... and show that we can speak enough Spanish and know which side of the table setting the fork goes. But wait, there's more.
You can now become a Spaniard, say goodbye to your own country (perhaps with relief and a rude note to the ambassador), but the Ministerio del Interior will reserve the right to strip you of your new nationality if you misbehave or 'for reasons of security'.
So what would you have to say to your old mates then?

I'm afraid I've missed your point completely. Just read 'the entertainer' - nothing seems to have changed at all.

Then the other quote, whilst being mildly amusing, doesn't help at all. It always used to be the case that you had to swear loyalty etc., I thought you always had t be able to Speak Spanish and the questions being asked are just to catch you out - I can't believe you would fail for not knowing the answers.

Have the rules changed?
 

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Sometimes, despite the accent or the pale (and pinkish) Scandinavian looks, a person can whip out his DNI Card, with one name and two apellidos on it, and say 'Wotcher, me old cock, I'm a local person too. By the way, what time is the paella on?'. Only of course, in Spanish.
I used to know a girl from Madrid. Blonde blue eyed. Skin to make a Swedish ski bunny jealous.

I wouldn't expect the average person taking advantage of the house purchase residency rule to have any issues with private health care. Why would there? You're talking about dropping €160k on what is likely a second home. Plus all the related costs. Plus any living expenses. Not exactly poverty .
 

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I used to know a girl from Madrid. Blonde blue eyed. Skin to make a Swedish ski bunny jealous.

I wouldn't expect the average person taking advantage of the house purchase residency rule to have any issues with private health care. Why would there? You're talking about dropping €160k on what is likely a second home. Plus all the related costs. Plus any living expenses. Not exactly poverty .
Especially considering the price of private health care in Spain compared to its cost in the US!
 
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