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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My partner received his VPF carte de séjour last month. He's now filling out his info to get his carte vitale, but I don't know if the following will cause a problem with the CPAM. When he was born in California, the last name on his birth certificate was that of his mom. Since he's been 1 year old or so, he took on (unofficially) the last name of his stepdad and he was able to get a US passport with his common usage last name. However, we've been told that the CPAM will not allow him to register if his name on his passport and birth certificate don't match. We read that the US embassy does NOT provide an attestation de concordance, but they can provide with a notarized sworn statement concerning the differences in your name as they appear on the passports. I don't mind going to the consulate to get this notarized, but before paying them I wanted to know if that would be a waste of time, and if so, any advice on what may work? Thanks
 

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I don't know for certain, but I can tell you that in general France is VERY strict about your name and it is damned difficult to change your name unless you have a very good reason for so doing.

In the US, the rule used to be that you could use any name you please as long as you are not trying to commit fraud with the use of a different name. (In practice, it can be a bit more difficult to explain the difference between the name you "use" and the name on your birth certificate.)

I was going to say that your partner "might" be able to explain if it was his father's name he took and his father's name appears on his birth certificate, but on re-reading I see you say it's the name of his step-father that he has taken.

If the best he can do is to get a notarized sworn statement from the consulate, I'd definitely try that route. He may need to provide further documentation of the circumstances - say, marriage documentation for his mother and stepfather, mother's i.d. or something similar.

If you're in a situation where you simply can't provide precisely what the French government wants, you can usually provide what you have (plus a few "extra" documents) and explain to them, calmly and politely what the situation is and why your documents don't conform to their "norms." Each case is different, but if you explain carefully, offer extra corroboration and then ask the official you're dealing with what they suggest you can do, you may find they'll find a way. (Let's just say I've done something similar - though under different circumstances.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bev, we'll try that route. If it doesn't work, he'll have to get a legal name change. However, I've read that you can only do that in your country of residence, which of course will not work in France. Any idea if it's possible to get a legal name change in a US state, even if you're no longer residing there?
 
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