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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

My Family just moved to France, near Bordeaux. My wife is French and ill, I have no dependable family in England, thus she has moved closer to her mum, sister etc. we decided it would be a good idea for her to more with the kids and me to remain behind while trying to learn French, well enough to work in France. however, its proving difficult, emotionally. thus, if anyone could pass on helpful tips on how I could work in France while learning the lingo, I would be very appreciative.

thanks in advance
Big Don
 

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One thing that springs to mind immediately is to ask among her family if anyone has any contacts that could help with you finding a job. Without much French, you may be looking primarily at the tourist industry, plus you'll be a bit limited to what's available around Bordeaux. Jobs in France are still found through personal contacts and having family there can make a big difference.

Of course it may also depend on what line of work you're in already and how readily transferable that is to France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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You will learn French much quicker immersed in France than you will on your own in England. What are your skills? Many people from the UK move to France and become self employed.
 

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You don't give any indication of your ages, which has a bearing on the advice people may feel is most appropriate.

Brit is correct that living in France and hearing the language spoken all around you all the time is the best way to learn French, and surely your wife and her family will help. I hate to say it but I think your chances of ever becoming fluent in French whilst living and working in the UK and trying to learn on your own in your spare time, are slim to say the least. You'll be able to greet people, buy things in shops, ask directions, tell the time and that sort of thing, but it doesn't prepare you for proper conversation with French speakers.
 

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ET is absolutely correct Learn the basics especially the verbs but actually being in France and listening and interacting with others is best way to improve As others have said what are your skills etc and then people can give more specific advice
 

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To be fair to the OP, even with fluent French he will struggle to find work. If the OP is earning a living in the UK, I am not sure it is a good idea to give it up thinking that you could move to France, quickly pick up the language and find a job. It could take many many years to find work. If it happens it will be very low paid compared to the UK.
 

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You're right of course Smeg, it's likely he'll find himself back at the bottom of the ladder as regards work, if he manages to get on the ladder at all. But, it all depends on his priorities. Which would you give up if you had to choose, your family or your job? It's a tough one I think.
Though we don't know enough about his circumstances to know how much choice he actually has, realistically.
 

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All depends on the OP's skills etc (of which we know nothing, other than that he needs to learn/improve his French). There is work in Bordeaux, which is doing better employment-wise than many other areas of France. However, tourism is about to wind down for the colder months, which will impact current employment prospects in that particular field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Big Don

Thank you all.

I'm in my 40s. My priority is my family. I'm in facilities Management, can’t go into too much detail, as I had my last post removed for advertising myself!!! Security, cleaning waste management... I've been looking at boarder control.

Now, job aside, I may be able to buy a house without a mortgage! I'm hoping anyway... I've considered working part-time while developing a small business too. Just wanting to get the feel of the area from guys and Girls in the know...

I've got an added urgency pushing me to develop a suitable level of French, i.e. not seeing my wife and kids too often, but I agree, living here and leaning it is slower than what it would be if I was in situ. but leaving a fairly well-paid job on the chance of getting on in France!!! Oh the dilemma... thanks for the info so far, you are all stars...

Keep suggestions coming though, you never know, our paths may cross sometime...

Big Don
:frusty:
 

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Hi Don

I guess from what you say you run your own company? Certainly you could start your own organisation here...there are various options. However, transplanting your company to find clients in France would be difficult - language, getting your first contract etc.

A few ideas....some better than others.

1. Learn French....do evening/weekend classes in the UK, take a holiday (ha!) in France in an intensive immersion school....hardwork! If you ask we can give you more ideas. We've all done it!

2. Look at the possibility of working for a big company in your business in the UK that has / wants French business. You might be able to get a foot in the door of French working life?

3. Can you subcontract some of your work so that you spend some time in France....long weekends etc? From what you say it might be difficult to do that in your line of work.....but if you want to live in France you have to think outside the proverbial box.

4. Many people commute Paris / London and reverse on the Eurostar. For a limited time you might be able do something like that. Beware that some French regional airports only fly to the UK in summer (or winter for skiing). It's very tiring and expensive doing this for a long time, but people do it.

5. I support Bev's comments about using the French family. Go for this in a big and unembarrassed way. For what it's worth I've helped people professionally find jobs after reduncancy. The technique is to go through your address book, Christmas card list, business friends etc ...and use these contacts to generate more contacts..... The trick is not to ask for a job...because the easy answer is "no". You ask if they know anyone who could help you....they are then under a moral pressure to give you a name or two. However, it may well be a long, slow and painful grind. You will need a good CV in French...separate subject for discussion!

PS several big shops here in Rouen (IKEA, big bookshops...FNAC, theatres etc) have bag checking heavies when you go in. They must get this service from someone?

Good luck

DejW

Thank you all.

I'm in my 40s. My priority is my family. I'm in facilities Management, can’t go into too much detail, as I had my last post removed for advertising myself!!! Security, cleaning waste management... I've been looking at boarder control.

Now, job aside, I may be able to buy a house without a mortgage! I'm hoping anyway... I've considered working part-time while developing a small business too. Just wanting to get the feel of the area from guys and Girls in the know...

I've got an added urgency pushing me to develop a suitable level of French, i.e. not seeing my wife and kids too often, but I agree, living here and leaning it is slower than what it would be if I was in situ. but leaving a fairly well-paid job on the chance of getting on in France!!! Oh the dilemma... thanks for the info so far, you are all stars...

Keep suggestions coming though, you never know, our paths may cross sometime...

Big Don
:frusty:
 

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Trouble with facilities management is that it sounds like clear communication and liaison is a big part of the job - providers, users, third parties... no room for misunderstandings.

You may need to do some serious thinking about a viable business idea, though France isn't the easiest country in Europe for setting up and running a business. One way or another you might find it hard to get into the French system if you have no source of income. I don't know how your wife managed to qualify for healthcare, but inactifs without a sufficient household income can find it a problem. France won't take responsibility for inactifs who arrive to live here without the means to be self-supporting, however this doesn't apply if you are economically active; even if your income is low, you should be entitled to support from the state.
 

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Trouble with facilities management is that it sounds like clear communication and liaison is a big part of the job - providers, users, third parties... no room for misunderstandings.

You may need to do some serious thinking about a viable business idea, though France isn't the easiest country in Europe for setting up and running a business. One way or another you might find it hard to get into the French system if you have no source of income. I don't know how your wife managed to qualify for healthcare, but inactifs without a sufficient household income can find it a problem. France won't take responsibility for inactifs who arrive to live here without the means to be self-supporting, however this doesn't apply if you are economically active; even if your income is low, you should be entitled to support from the state.
Don't forget the wife is French. If she was ill when she returned her cover may well have been transferred to France (for a time) and paid for by the UK.

Equally, the OP is the spouse of a French citizen and intends/hopes to join her and his children in France, therefore may not have to prove an income and by the time he arrives his wife might be in receipt of assistance from the State and, with kids, she may well already be in receipt of eg. assistance from CAF.
 

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ET is absolutely correct Learn the basics especially the verbs but actually being in France and listening and interacting with others is best way to improve As others have said what are your skills etc and then people can give more specific advice
Love it. ET is absolutely correct for agreeing with what I said.
 

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You're right of course Smeg, it's likely he'll find himself back at the bottom of the ladder as regards work, if he manages to get on the ladder at all. But, it all depends on his priorities. Which would you give up if you had to choose, your family or your job? It's a tough one I think.
Though we don't know enough about his circumstances to know how much choice he actually has, realistically.
Isn't the answer to that one well known? He followed his wife to France.
 

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Isn't the answer to that one well known? He followed his wife to France.
Actually, I was the one that got transferred to France. She followed me. :)

She was not to keen to be fair? ;)

Any other assumptions you would like to make Bit in France ?

P.S...there is a play on words there if look closely. :D
 
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